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Have purchased a Didgeridoo

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posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 04:48 AM
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I used to play one many years back, but I only had a cheap one. This time I have purchased one from Germany. It is a full size didjeridoo, made from real Australian eucalyptus, but finished by a German guy called Bernhard, who has an amazing array.

I think vibrations are very important and can have a good effect on our wellbeing physically and mentally. Obviously music in all its glory is only vibrating air projected acoustically, amplified or synthesized electrically. The Tibetan Monks have long used sound vibration and there is a wealth of cultural knowledge and practise related to sound and vibration. The term "good vibes" mean something!

I think it is a mighty healthy pursuit for one's lungs, too. The mastery comes when one is able to circular breath, like other brass instrument technique.

I am very taken with how old a practise this is with the Native Australian people. Their culture has always fascinated me. Some believe the instrument may be 40, 000 years old. There is archaeological evidence going back 2,000 years. The original ones were made by termites who hollowed out the eucalyptus. Bees wax is used to mould a mouth piece.

I think it will be very good for my breathing, for meditating and helping to relax as that can be an issue for me. What an honour, too, to participate in such an ancient ritual. It is such a unique instrument and a very central part of Native Australian culture traditionally. The didjeridoo has spread from Native Australia across the whole globe.

Anyone else out there who plays or has played the didjeridoo? Any tips or guidance to offer?




edit on 30-12-2015 by Revolution9 because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 05:10 AM
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I love the sound of a didje. They do leave your face feeling a little funny after playing one for an hour. Whole skull tingling.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 05:35 AM
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a reply to: Revolution9

No idea how to play one mate, personally. Just know that you need a really good set of lungs to do it well, lol. It is amazing how much it truly sounds like the Australian outback though, when a person really masters it.

The aboriginals are an amazing culture, they represent who we all were before we settled into the agriculture lifestyle. I could go on forever about how fascinating they are, when it comes to analyzing us homo sapiens us a whole... but I'll leave it at that.

Enjoy your didgeridoo mate.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 05:42 AM
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From a German? Really?

Did he use white ants?

It is not real mate. It's a knock off!

Lol, German making didgeridoo.

P



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 05:49 AM
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a reply to: pheonix358

A section of PVC pipe will do the job. It is the player more than the particulars of how the instrument was made.
If the Germans can make Volkswagens and BMW's, I have no lack of faith in their ability to make hollow wooded tubes.

edit on 30-12-2015 by skunkape23 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 07:13 AM
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a reply to: pheonix358

I can't afford the authentic ones. This one was expensive enough. To have the original eucalyptus material is enough for me. If you saw what the guy has achieved and how good a player he is you would no be as full of doubt about European ability to produce a reasonable enough instrument.

The aboriginal instruments are way out of my price range unfortunately, but it is possible to get a vibration out of most hollow tubes as the other member has stated.

Aussies are so fortunate to have all that indigenous culture right on their door step. Money can't buy wholly the experiences I would like in this life: Just to have a night out under the stars by an open fire in the outback with those guys is just about number one on what I would like to do. What goes against that is the cost of travel (air fare, etc, all the way to Australia and back) and the fact that I may not be very welcome or my intentions not understood as benevolent.

Here is the guy playing the actual didjeridoo I have purchased:




edit on 30-12-2015 by Revolution9 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 07:36 AM
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a reply to: Subaeruginosa

Thank you. I have been a singer for over thirty years, have a powerful set of lungs from that and all the cycling I do. I have played the harmonica for over thirty years, too. I used to play didj' many years ago. I think the controlled breathing and vibration may help me to relax. Singing, playing guitar tends to wire me up so it will be good to have the downer to the upper so to speak.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 07:58 AM
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originally posted by: Revolution9
a reply to: pheonix358

I can't afford the authentic ones. This one was expensive enough. To have the original eucalyptus material is enough for me. If you saw what the guy has achieved and how good a player he is you would no be as full of doubt about European ability to produce a reasonable enough instrument.

The aboriginal instruments are way out of my price range unfortunately, but it is possible to get a vibration out of most hollow tubes as the other member has stated.

Aussies are so fortunate to have all that indigenous culture right on their door step. Money can't buy wholly the experiences I would like in this life: Just to have a night out under the stars by an open fire in the outback with those guys is just about number one on what I would like to do. What goes against that is the cost of travel (air fare, etc, all the way to Australia and back) and the fact that I may not be very welcome or my intentions not understood as benevolent.

Here is the guy playing the actual didjeridoo I have purchased:




Huel Howser CalGold
Precisely...

50 years ago, I was 6 years old and used Christams wrapping tubes as digie's and I know knowledge of digie's were but vibrated a howl thru the cardboard.

I saw that Huel Howser program on PBS years ago and learned what digie's. The feastival showed a world wide representation (at this point) not just Aboriginals as the experts.

The final part of Huel's show a big dude with mammoth lungs plays a $5000 version with expertise beyond comprehension...



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 09:20 AM
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Yeah a tip
Loosen the lips by blowing a brrrr sound and as for breathing techniques

Tricky, try blowing through a straw into a glass of water constantly, while constantly breathing through your nose.keep filling your cheeks up with air Easy to show but hard to explain

It's actually very easy, just takes a little practice, you don't need much air in the tube to get a good note
pVC piping makes a great sound



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 09:41 AM
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a reply to: Revolution9

Didgeridoos are one of those rare instruments that relies on physical skill rather than skill with the instrument. The native aussies replicate the sound of native fauna and when teamed up someone on a jews harp it's brilliant to hear.

It should seem simple but I doubt it is, like a jews harp maybe it can come from deep in the throat. Trying playing it first and and just make noises-as they say practice make perfect.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 11:09 AM
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a reply to: Revolution9

I visited Oz years ago and bought one there as a souvenir.

I surprised myself when I halfheartedly started to practise it; I got the hang of the 'circular breathing' thing remarkably fast and was able to produce a single, unbroken tone. Wonderful, unique experience.

Then it got nicked in a burglary, but that's another story.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 11:24 AM
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originally posted by: Raggedyman
Yeah a tip
Loosen the lips by blowing a brrrr sound and as for breathing techniques

Tricky, try blowing through a straw into a glass of water constantly, while constantly breathing through your nose.keep filling your cheeks up with air Easy to show but hard to explain

It's actually very easy, just takes a little practice, you don't need much air in the tube to get a good note
pVC piping makes a great sound


Thank you very much.

I snore terribly at night and get Sleep Apnea. I think my unconscious has told me something here. Lo and behold,


In 2005 The British Medical Journal reported on a study conducted at the University of Zurich in which researchers hypothesized that regular didgeridoo playing could be an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. The sleeping disorder is characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep, often leading to daytime restlessness.
www.didgeproject.com...


Participants were tested at the beginning and end of the study for four different quality-of-sleep and daytime sleepiness indicators and were then compared to a control group that was not allowed to play the didgeridoo. For each indicator, the group that practiced the didgeridoo made significant improvements compared to the group that did not.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 03:20 PM
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I've been playing didge for about 20 years. Let me tell you, circular breathing is actually a basic skill, and is not where mastery begins. I don't feel I am any where near a master. When you can circular breathe as second nature, it will open up worlds for you.

I have had many amazing magical experiences playing digj. I suggest playing outdoors, and playing for the animals and plants the same way you would play for humans. Some animals really enjoy the sound. Once I went halfway into a tree here in Hawaii in a park that has really high roots like walls that go up about three feet from the ground. I sat in there for the resonance, and a bird called a plover watched and listened to me, zigzagging closer and closer to me, as I play for it for about 45 minutes.

You can also make amazing patterns on still when with the vibrations. Enjoy your magickal journey.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: AzothPendragon

Great, yes I have got an idea of this magic and I want to experience it.

Sounds great the way you play it. I live in a very natural place by the ocean. I want to take the instrument over the cliffs and meditate in nature. I walk many miles and it will be a nice companion.

Respect to you for spending so long with the Didjeridoo.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 06:26 PM
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C'mon man! Play us some funky town!



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 12:38 AM
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Well I hope you aren't a female, as that would be taboo to play it




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