It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Guitar: tips tricks mods rigs - Q&A or just share info

page: 1
6
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 09:32 PM
link   
Are you a guitar player? Do you have any tips or tricks you can share? Or are you looking for a particular sound you can't quite nail down? Not sure what effects to use? Maybe you have some warm-up or practice techniques you can share. Talk about your rig and your set-up, what you like about it and why.

I started playing guitar when I was 9, added drums when I was 13, bass at 14, and then focused on guitar at 15. I have played in a variety of bands, from garage bands who couldn't get a gig, to playing in front of thousands of people at the Amphitheater in Chicago (that was a long time ago). I have had the good fortune of meeting just about all of the musicians I practically worshiped when I was younger, and many more since then.

The equipment:

I have a set of vintage Electra guitars. If you are not familiar with Electra, they were made by Matsumoku in Japan and imported by SLM, the St. Louis Music Company. In the 70's they suddenly became rather famous, or infamous if you will, for a law suit filed by Gibson. Electra was making Les Paul style guitars that were identical to Gibson in every way, right down to the open book headstock and traditional Les Paul headstock inlays. The problem for Gibson, is the Electra Les Pauls were as good or better than the Gibsons of the same time period. I had a Gibson Les Paul Custom Deluxe, wine read with gold hardware and cream bindings and a Les Paul black beauty at the same time as the Electras and I played the Electras. Post law suit guitars from Electra had a different headstock called 'the wave' to accommodate the law suit. One of the unique things about the Electra guitars were the MPC models. These guitars had a cavity in the back of the guitar where you could attach two effects modules that were controlled with a toggle switch and volume/intensity pot on the front of the guitar. To counter the lost tone and sustain from the removal of so much wood Electra used a brass nut, brass bridge, and mounted the bridge in a 14oz bar of brass sunk into the body of the guitar. I have never had a guitar with so much sustain. The MPC modules had a variety of effects such as overdrive, phaser, octave box, chorus, wah wah, and so on, twelve in all. I have the Vulcan 930, Endorser X935, X340, Avenger 2275N (strat style).

On the more modern side I have two Dean ML guitars. One is a brazilia burst signed by Michael Batio and Dean Zelinsky. The other is a gloss black modifier with a Floyd that I have done a good amount of work on. I set it up as a slinky with what might be the lowest, softest touch action I have ever had on a guitar. I love the way it plays. I like to customize guitars and make my version of custom shop pieces. I don't shy away from adding some color, by many means, and making the instrument truly one of a kind.

I just finished a Fender Squire strat for my niece. She has shown a natural talent for guitar and I wanted to help her along. I took a stock Squire strat, and yanked all the electronics. I replaced it all with USA switches and pots, and a nice healthy set of 57/62 re-issue pick-ups. The Squire bodies are thinner and lighter than a US strat so the tone and sustain are lacking. These pick ups make up the difference nicely. I had to do some work to make the US parts fit, they are typically a little bigger/heavy duty than the China or Taiwan parts. There was a small issue with the G string not strobing correctly but that was an easy fix taking a file to the nut. The end result is when she starts playing this guitar people are going to go buy Squire strats and not be able to figure out why theirs doesn't sound the same. ;-)

That leaves the amps. I have to admit, I am a bit of a Spinal Tap guy when it comes to amps. They cant be too big or too loud, and if they go to 11, even better. I have two Lab Series L-11 stacks. These were made by Moog via Norlin for Gibson in the late 70's. They were supposedly the first solid state amps that could create a decent tube amp sound. There are always opinions on both sides of the coin as to whether they accomplished that goal or not. Either way, I love the sound of these amps and the power behind them, 200 watts each. I also have a Line 6 programmable head with a floor board that I run as master over the other two. I know, its a lot.

I run the guitar signal straight to the Line 6 head. The line out is split and goes in to each of the L-11 heads. I use the stereo-out of each L-11 and run lines to 'both' cabinets of each stack. What I end up with is a phased array of two separate two-cabinet stereo outputs. The control I have over this rig is unreal. Another thing I love to do is send a straight signal to one stack and the effects to the other. I can monitor the straight signal and not have to hear the timing delay of the effects from the other stack that the audience hears. I just play as I always do and let the effects do their thing without having to hear them directly. When I monitored the effects loop I was always thinking things like, the echo is just a bit too slow or the phase peak is too high. I never worry about that stuff any more and it makes playing much more enjoyable.

My early influences were Robin Trower, Van Halen, Michael Shenker, Alex LIfeson, Frank Marino, Randy Rhoades, SRV, an eclectic bunch. I tend to lean more toward the harder heavier side now than I did when I was younger. I really like a lot of foreign metal bands. I think the US kind of dropped the ball on that. But I do like Five Finger Death Punch an awful lot. And there are some Japanese guitarists that really amaze me. I have been listening to Katsu Ohta lately. He is much along the lines of Yngwie Malmsteen. If you lean more toward acoustic guitar I suggest listening to Sunga Jung. His arrangement of "My Heart Will Go On" (titanic theme) is absolutely brilliant.




posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 09:53 PM
link   
a reply to: Vroomfondel

It took me decades to get it but, I did finally get an all original Roland JC full stack. It's only the JC-120H head, not the 200.

With a PRS McCarty II it is the cleanest, sweetest and loudest rig I have ever had. It barely makes a sound until you play.



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 10:12 PM
link   

originally posted by: greencmp
a reply to: Vroomfondel

It took me decades to get it but, I did finally get an all original Roland JC full stack. It's only the JC-120H head, not the 200.

With a PRS McCarty II it is the cleanest, sweetest and loudest rig I have ever had. It barely makes a sound until you play.


I love PRS guitars. Very nice. There is a lot to be said about a good clean rich sound and the jazz chorus amp delivers. Thats a great combination.

I like your description of the rig barely making a sound until you play. That was one thing I was after when setting mine up. I can hit a chord and get all the crunch and drive I could ever ask for, then silence the strings and just take my hands off the guitar. No feedback, no hiss, nothing. I love that. Of course, one bump on the guitar and I get a room full of whale language, but hey, whales like to rock and roll too...



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 10:14 PM
link   
I have a cheap Peavy Raptor that's about 15 years old. It's a black and white Fender Stratocaster rip off

EDIT: The place where you plug the patch cord in, that jack on the guitar? It's loose as hell and I can't ever seem to get it tight even with a wrench. It just gets loose over and over.


edit on 29-12-2015 by MystikMushroom because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 10:21 PM
link   
On the acoustic side, I do have a fairly nice one. I have a Canadian-made Art & Lutherie:



Folk Cedar Antique Burst

specs
Back & Sides : Wild Cherry
Neck : Silver leaf maple
Top : Cedar (Pressure Tested Solid Top)
Fingerboard & Bridge : Rosewood
Finish : Semi-Gloss Custom Varnish Finish
Tusq® nut & saddle by Graphtech

Proudly handcrafted in Canada.

It sadly sits in its case most of the time. It's a very difficult guitar to play because of how hard you have press the strings to the fingerboard. Expert players have no problem, but I never could get used to playing it because of how hard it is to press the strings down. I hope it's OK, it's just been sitting in its case forever.
edit on 29-12-2015 by MystikMushroom because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 10:23 PM
link   
a reply to: Vroomfondel

Yeah, my brother is a Les Paul guy so I have played a similar rig to yours. He has a few higher end tube kits and a JCM800.

Tip wise, I spent the extra money for all solid silver core cables (except the speaker outs). It takes it all right up to the edge of what's possible, to 11.5 if you will.



If you have a high quality front end and good converters, the other thing I find infinitely useful is the Reamp (I got the red v2).



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 10:27 PM
link   

originally posted by: MystikMushroom
I have a cheap Peavy Raptor that's about 15 years old. It's a black and white Fender Stratocaster rip off

EDIT: The place where you plug the patch cord in, that jack on the guitar? It's loose as hell and I can't ever seem to get it tight even with a wrench. It just gets loose over and over.



You can try putting a lock washer on it, that should keep it tight.

I still have my Ibanez Roadstar II, it just feels right because I played it for so long.

There's also some harmonics that it produces acoustically that never seem to come through when amplified.



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 11:01 PM
link   
I have played a lot of guitars. My favorite is a Reverend Manta Ray semi hollow. The neck runs to the tail and it is hollowed on the side of the lower strings. Bigsby vibrato, roller pins on the bridge, locking tuners.
You could bat a baseball with it and it will stay in tune.
It feeds back beautifully. I sleep with it sometimes.
Morely Bad Horsie Wah pedal, Electro-Harmonix Big Muff. and a Carvin X-100b. All I need to make a statement.



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 11:12 PM
link   
Mostly playing Django on my Giannini cravola style acoustic.

Bunch of Frankensteins built from parts I scrounged from music stores run thru a Blues jr. Particularly fond of the hollow bodies.

Acoustic/electric fretless Chinese bass.


edit on 29-12-2015 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 11:23 PM
link   

originally posted by: greencmp
a reply to: Vroomfondel

It took me decades to get it but, I did finally get an all original Roland JC full stack. It's only the JC-120H head, not the 200.

With a PRS McCarty II it is the cleanest, sweetest and loudest rig I have ever had. It barely makes a sound until you play.


I loved the Jazz Chorus (only borrowed)! Such a perfect 'spatial' sound. The 120 was the best, the others were good but didn't have the magic.

Playing through lots of custom rigs as I did, I did find that if you added horn tweeters (properly crossed over & matched of course), you got a real brittle glass 'ring' sound that I love. You have to put a notch filter in about 1kHz-4KHz to get rid of the harshness, though. I also used to equalize out some midrange too, as I felt it (sometimes you have to boost or cut to fit the room & rig). My current rig for stage work uses an EV foldback speaker (one of those molded plastic ones).

I custom built a mosfet 'A' class amp and two transmission line speakers (three way Xover), they were designed so that all frequencies from all drivers would be phase aligned when you stand about three meters from them and are my height. The weird thing is that at the "sweet spot", it is like the sound is coming from about three meters behind the speakers and the stereo image is super definite - great for clean Jazz, but it makes most chorus units sound 'flat'.

For the guitar, I use a Stratocaster copy that was produced by Roland as is guitar synthesizer controller. The synth unit had the problem of tracking too slowly, so I don't use it (especially on stage), but the guitar itself has a nice balance & tone. Favorite pickup pattern is with bridge & middle pickups (not humbuckers) out of phase.



edit on 29/12/2015 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 12:10 AM
link   
Now I just play around with my analog synth in Logic and make all kinds of weird sounds and music. I even threw together a basic rap beat the other day. I think I'm more like Dr. Dre than Van Halen.

*edit, I actually have a real, analog mono synth...not a virtual instrument inside of Logic. I just use logic and my audio interface to record it.
edit on 30-12-2015 by MystikMushroom because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 01:26 AM
link   
My husband would have plenty to say in here, but he isn't into forums. He is a self taught guitarist and amazing. Sadly, he rarely ever plays anymore. Have a couple of pics to share.





I love the decorative mother of pearl inlay on the second one!



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 06:05 AM
link   
a reply to: Vroomfondel

I have a Stagg XB 300 bass guitar. I love its shape, weight, colour, and I used to love its sound.



However, the dear old thing is somewhat in need of an overhaul, because of things that I do not love about it.

1) The neck has some relief issues, which have not been solved by adjustment of the truss rod. Despite a decent cranking, the relief problem persists on one side of the neck. This means that playability and therefore sound has suffered greatly, because not only is fingering more difficult on one side of the neck than the other, but the strings are further from the pickups than they ought to be by a fair bit. My suspicion is that I might need to get a new neck to solve the problem.

2) When I first purchased it, my bass was the perfect thing for me. I had previously had a truly dilapidated knock off bass, which had fret buzz issues you would not believe, caused by a whole host of structural issues, not to mention bad wiring, crappy pickups, crappy set up...it was a piece of crap from the get go. The XB 300 was a delight upon being unboxed, and even playing the factory strings for years, as I did, it was a thousand times the beast that my old bass was. However, as I became more familiar with it, and indeed as I started to really find my rhythm over the years, I have realised that there are aspects of the set up that I would change.

The main issue is the action. I want to lower the action. Now on many basses this is as simple as altering the saddle position at the bridge. However, because of the type of bridge which is factory fit to the XB 300, and the staggering size of the saddles it comes with, that is not an option. It came set with those fat saddles already kissing the bridge, and so my strings cannot be drawn closer to the neck, allowing for faster fingering and all that sweet, sweet stuff. So I am also in need of a new bridge.

3) And here we come to largely pointless and over the top changes...If I am basically throwing out the bridge, and the neck, then why the hell would I keep the serviceable, but old, and unbranded humbuckers which currently reside betwixt the defunct bridge, and ruined neck? Why not get some fat bastard pickups in there while I have the hood up so to speak? Of course, the answer is money, which rather brings me round to the real crux of the issue.

Even if I throw out any fanciful modifications like new pickups, or going properly mental and getting an amp built on to the thing, the fact is that with only the necessary repairs and basic modifications I need to make it work for me going forward, I am looking at spending more money than I have to hand. So for now, I shall have to mournfully crank out whatever tones I can coax from the once mighty, death blasting, instrument of sonic violence that I have hanging on my wall.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 06:14 AM
link   
Since you just said share information. I'd like to say a little about guitars and amps. The electric guitar should have strings on that let your fingers float on the fretboard with musical expression without a thought of pain occurring. The neck must be straight with no bends in it. The tuning pegs should stay in tune. It can get more in detail but these three will keep you motivated.

The amp, well you just got to have a good speaker. With a good speaker and electric guitar with cheap pickup will still rock. Actually these days you got to really go out of your way to find an electric guitar with crappy sounding pickups and yes, I even live in Asia.
edit on 1200000027162015-12-30T06:16:27-06:00162712am6 by musicismagic because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 07:35 AM
link   

originally posted by: MystikMushroom
I have a cheap Peavy Raptor that's about 15 years old. It's a black and white Fender Stratocaster rip off

EDIT: The place where you plug the patch cord in, that jack on the guitar? It's loose as hell and I can't ever seem to get it tight even with a wrench. It just gets loose over and over.



I would try a star lock-washer under the jack ring if there is one, or under the nut if there isn't. The star type are relatively flat but still work well in that application. If that doesn't work you can try double nutting if there is enough thread exposed. If not, you can replace the jack itself and keep the original jack plate. It involves soldering two wires. If you are uncomfortable with doing that a decent guitar tech should be able to do it for you for minimal cost. If you go the replacement route, get a US piece. They are usually a little beefier.

Good luck.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 07:42 AM
link   

originally posted by: MystikMushroom
On the acoustic side, I do have a fairly nice one. I have a Canadian-made Art & Lutherie:



Folk Cedar Antique Burst

specs
Back & Sides : Wild Cherry
Neck : Silver leaf maple
Top : Cedar (Pressure Tested Solid Top)
Fingerboard & Bridge : Rosewood
Finish : Semi-Gloss Custom Varnish Finish
Tusq® nut & saddle by Graphtech

Proudly handcrafted in Canada.

It sadly sits in its case most of the time. It's a very difficult guitar to play because of how hard you have press the strings to the fingerboard. Expert players have no problem, but I never could get used to playing it because of how hard it is to press the strings down. I hope it's OK, it's just been sitting in its case forever.


That is a very pretty guitar. Its a shame it is uncomfortable to play. About the only thing I could suggest would be to try lighter gauge strings. You could even go as far as making the E and B the same gauge. Its a hit and miss approach though. Because of the lack of adjustment capability the guitar relies on a certain degree of expected string tension. Its worth a try though.

Action is a bear sometimes. I know if its high I will have trouble with it. I use a very light touch on the strings to begin with and high action is just too much for me most of the time even with bar chords. The technique I developed years ago limits me to a very light fretting hand unless I am anchored in place, which I try not to be. Even the, its still a far lighter touch than most. I feel your pain on that one. I hope you can work it out.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 07:48 AM
link   

originally posted by: skunkape23
I have played a lot of guitars. My favorite is a Reverend Manta Ray semi hollow. The neck runs to the tail and it is hollowed on the side of the lower strings. Bigsby vibrato, roller pins on the bridge, locking tuners.
You could bat a baseball with it and it will stay in tune.
It feeds back beautifully. I sleep with it sometimes.
Morely Bad Horsie Wah pedal, Electro-Harmonix Big Muff. and a Carvin X-100b. All I need to make a statement.


Thats a nice guitar. I had an ES335 black beauty for a while. Very similar. Such a sweet sound. Gotta love the roller bridge. Sounds like you have a great rig. Like you said - everything you need.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 07:54 AM
link   

originally posted by: olaru12
Mostly playing Django on my Giannini cravola style acoustic.

Bunch of Frankensteins built from parts I scrounged from music stores run thru a Blues jr. Particularly fond of the hollow bodies.

Acoustic/electric fretless Chinese bass.



Django...very nice. For those who don't know, he only had two working fingers on his fret hand, and he still shredded.

You have to love a good frankenstein. The mutts of the guitar world, but as they say, there is nothing more loyal, faithful or lovable than the mutt. Music is a very personal thing and when you put your own instrument together, it just seems to be that much more expressive. Its a lot to take on sometimes but you just dive in and keep swimming until you reach the other side. Its a fun journey and you can end up in a place you never thought you would be.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 07:58 AM
link   

originally posted by: MystikMushroom
Now I just play around with my analog synth in Logic and make all kinds of weird sounds and music. I even threw together a basic rap beat the other day. I think I'm more like Dr. Dre than Van Halen.

*edit, I actually have a real, analog mono synth...not a virtual instrument inside of Logic. I just use logic and my audio interface to record it.


Very cool. I have never tried a synth. I watched a guy play one night. They were playing Mr. Crowley. He did the whole keyboard intro on his guitar, then switched to the guitar part. It was seamless and sounded absolutely incredible. I was very impressed.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 07:59 AM
link   

originally posted by: Night Star
My husband would have plenty to say in here, but he isn't into forums. He is a self taught guitarist and amazing. Sadly, he rarely ever plays anymore. Have a couple of pics to share.





I love the decorative mother of pearl inlay on the second one!


Very nice! I always liked the tree of life inlays too.



new topics

top topics



 
6
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join