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The unanswerable question

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posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 06:24 AM
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a reply to: gflyg

When we bullsh1t to much we end up knee deep in it.

or

This is what happens when you realise the difference between a reply
and an answer.




posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 06:25 AM
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a reply to: ChaoticOrder

Gravity is a force.

What determines a galaxies age?



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 06:51 AM
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www.faculty.jacobs-university.de...

Instead of air how about a perfect vacuum? And by that I mean nothing can get inside it

a reply to: Vector99


edit on 26-12-2015 by bottleslingguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 06:53 AM
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a reply to: bottleslingguy

To fill a bubble? It would implode.



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 06:57 AM
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originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: bottleslingguy

To fill a bubble? It would implode.


Dude think about it, how can space be filled with air? Think of the edge of what a Mandelbrot fractal looks like, it's the interaction between something and nothing



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 07:03 AM
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originally posted by: glend
We are not on the outside edge of the universe expanding into an empty void but between two great walls that are expanding with us. One such wall is called the CfA2 Great Wall.


That's right and it is described as a filament which is just one more description of Birkeland currents which are at the foundation of EU theory www.plasma-universe.com... " Both of these classes of phenomena should have a general astrophysical interest far beyond that of understanding the space environment of our own Earth."

edit on 26-12-2015 by bottleslingguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 07:03 AM
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a reply to: bottleslingguy




Dude think about it, how can space be filled with air?

Well for one, air is a combination of gases we can accurately measure at any point in time on earth.




Mandelbrot fractal

I've never heard of this. I am looking at the wiki for it at the moment though.



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 07:21 AM
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a reply to: gflyg

When i read your opening line, i instantly thought of this:





But........ space. it is huge, we have no real idea why or how it is there, and unless we are given the information from an alien, i doubt we ever will in our lifetime.

Peace!



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 09:36 AM
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a reply to: gflyg

There are plenty of older galaxies-The elliptical galaxies are made up of older stars that were some of the first to exist- The elder elliptical galaxies are an enigma they should have an obvious galactic center but somehow they don't and that could aid in the search for Darth Energy or matter and reinforces the fact that you can still contribute no matter how old you are.

edit on 26-12-2015 by Thecakeisalie because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 03:12 PM
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a reply to: Ghost147

secondly, no one knows how old the universe is its all theory and since ive been around the age of the universe has changed about 4 times



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 10:55 PM
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a poor way to demonstrate the expansion of the universe:

get a marker a balloon and a string.
blow up the balloon half way.
draw some dots on it and measure how far they are from each other with the string.
blow up teh balloon the rest of the way.
measure how far the dot are away from each other.
they are all farther apart.

from our perspective (make our point on the balloon special), everything is moving away from us.



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 11:03 PM
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originally posted by: Ghost147
a reply to: gflyg

Firstly, the universe is about 13.77 billion years old (and that's with an uncertainty of only 0.4%), so if you're seeing galaxies that are 13.8 billion years, report your findings and collect your Nobel prize.

Secondly, according to the theory of cosmic inflation, the entire universe’s size is at least 10^23 times larger than the size of the observable universe. So we don't know what is beyond the 'edge of the universe' because we simply aren't able to observe it (at this current time)

Thirdly, why is this in the Origin's and Creationism forum? Your questions don't seem to be based off of those topics, but more so from a scientific perspective alone.

Because a little birdie told me that the particles I "ORIGINATED" (hence " origins and creations") from came from a big bang and the further I look out into space in either direction the closer I can see to when that happened. Now when I combine that with the expansion of the universe from that bang when I peer at those a young galaxies I would expect to be moving away from those young galaxies. Now if i see young galaxies from the begining of the bang all around me then the expansion must be coming at me from all directions. It would look like everything was expanding towards me and I was at the center seeing as tho no matter what direction I look I can only see roughly 13.77 billion light years and what I see is galaxies just forming from a big bang expanding toward me from every direction.
If I am Seeing this wrong please tell me What part is?



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 11:15 PM
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originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: gflyg

You are aware galaxies can collide and make a "new" galaxy right?




If the Big Bang started from one point shouldn't one person on one side of the globe see young galaxies and the person on the other see the void we are expanding into?

Theoretically the universe expanded uniformly in every direction.
But if I'm floating in space all alone with Hubble vision every direction I look I see gas and young galaxies just starting out after a big bang. Wouldn't I see everything expanding toward me with me in the center seeing as tho no matter what direction roughly 13.77 billion light years I look I see young galaxies after the big bang expanding from that point toward me in all directions. I might be looking at it wrong but then how should I look at it?



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 11:24 PM
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originally posted by: wwiilliiaamm
a poor way to demonstrate the expansion of the universe:

get a marker a balloon and a string.
blow up the balloon half way.
draw some dots on it and measure how far they are from each other with the string.
blow up teh balloon the rest of the way.
measure how far the dot are away from each other.
they are all farther apart.

from our perspective (make our point on the balloon special), everything is moving away from us.



but my understanding of the big bang is every direction I look I see young galaxies from the begining of a big bang. With my understanding of expansion shouldn't objects from the big bang move away from the bang? Now if i am surrounded by those objects moving away from a big bang roughly 13.7 light years all around me. If I'm floating in space all alone would objects look like they are moving toward me from all directions cause that's what I see when I look all around me 13.7 billion light years



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 11:34 PM
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To use the balloon again...
the closest dots might move away a little,
the dots farthest away will move away much more.
the near galaxies move away a little
while the young galaxies (farthest away) move awya faster


To move away from teh the balloon idea....
near by galaxies are far away. it takes five years for light to get to us.
far away galaxies are much farther away. it takes 1000 years for light to get to us.

if two galaxies were "born" on the same day, the one farther away would appear to be 995 years younger because it took the light so long to get to us.


It is a wonderful topic, but I am not able to explain it as well as a book could explain it. Good authors include Greene, Smoot and Hawking.

Smoot is my favorite in the topic.



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 11:34 PM
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If I was floating alone in space with Hubble vision. And I looked all around me roughly 13.77 billion light years in every direction. Wouldn't I see young galaxies on one side expanding out from the big bang then look the other direction at young galaxies expanding toward me from a big bang. Now aren't those young galaxies on both sides expanding toward eachother? How is that possible coming toward me front to back, side to side,top to bottom? Cause isn't that what I see 13.77 billion light years in every direction? Objects just after the bang? I just don't understand how that is possible.



posted on Dec, 27 2015 @ 12:03 AM
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a reply to: gflyg

You asked this question in another thread yesterday and I replied it there. You didn’t respond, but here you are starting a thread around the same question.

Did you not believe my answer, or not understand it, or simply not read it?



posted on Dec, 27 2015 @ 12:09 AM
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I guess I'm scaling it down to the size of my room with the wall's being the 13.77 billion light year sphere I can see if I'm floating in the middle of my room as if it were space. I guess seeing my wall's as the gas from the early universe. If that gas came from a bang. Trying to envision that sphere I see as a flat plane on a balloon is really hard



posted on Dec, 27 2015 @ 08:54 AM
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originally posted by: gflyg
If I was floating alone in space with Hubble vision. And I looked all around me roughly 13.77 billion light years in every direction. Wouldn't I see young galaxies on one side expanding out from the big bang then look the other direction at young galaxies expanding toward me from a big bang. Now aren't those young galaxies on both sides expanding toward eachother? How is that possible coming toward me front to back, side to side,top to bottom? Cause isn't that what I see 13.77 billion light years in every direction? Objects just after the bang? I just don't understand how that is possible.


that's the problem with "thought experiments" you don't have any kind of baseline to start. I mean we're in a galactic arm in a spiral galaxy which is going to eventually collide with another galaxy so how can we all be moving away from each other? maybe it's more like we are expanding uniformly further away from our atomic nuclei? like further away from our atomic constituents? or maybe our soul is migrating away from matter?



posted on Dec, 27 2015 @ 09:10 AM
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originally posted by: Astyanax
a reply to: gflyg

You asked this question in another thread yesterday and I replied it there. You didn’t respond, but here you are starting a thread around the same question.

Did you not believe my answer, or not understand it, or simply not read it?
sorry I'm new at this and didn't see where you responded. I will look now and reply. After I replied to you I decided I wanted to hear more opinions on it and figures I would get more with a thread then just responding to you



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