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The unanswerable question

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posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 12:21 AM
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Why is it when I look all around me all I see is young galaxies? If I put somebody on different points all around the globe and we all look straight up in the air we would all see young galaxies up to 13.8 billion light years away. Where is the void that we are expanding into? If the Big Bang started from one point shouldn't one person on one side of the globe see young galaxies and the person on the other see the void we are expanding into? Why am i surrounded by young galaxies? Where is the void that I am expanding into? Cuz when I look up and when I look down and when I look left and when I looked right all I see is young galaxies?
edit on 26-12-2015 by gflyg because: reword




posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 12:25 AM
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a reply to: gflyg

First, you seem to be mistaking stars and galaxies for 'universes'. Second, there are stars and galaxies of varying ages in all directions. Some older than our galaxy, some younger. Pick up an astronomy/cosmology book sometime



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 12:30 AM
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originally posted by: AdmireTheDistance
a reply to: gflyg

First, you seem to be mistaking stars and galaxies for 'universes'. Second, there are stars and galaxies of varying ages in all directions. Some older than our galaxy, some younger. Pick up an astronomy/cosmology book sometime
I ment to say galaxies not universes. So your telling me if the big bang is true if i look one direction all I will see is old galaxies and if i look the opposite direction I will see older galaxies? Why is it that no matter how far I look in either direction I can see young galaxies if we originated from one point of a big bang?
edit on 26-12-2015 by gflyg because: misspell reword



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 12:45 AM
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originally posted by: AdmireTheDistance
a reply to: gflyg

First, you seem to be mistaking stars and galaxies for 'universes'. Second, there are stars and galaxies of varying ages in all directions. Some older than our galaxy, some younger. Pick up an astronomy/cosmology book sometime
I've read alot of books but never heard them say if you look in this direction you Can see young galaxies where we first originated from and if you look this direction you Can see all older galaxies and the void we are expanding into. 13.8 billion light years in every direction I look. Looks like young galaxies from the Bering of time. So what direction are we expanding towards? Every direction I look I can see a galaxies that were forming at the becoming of the universe and there's not one direction I can look that shows me the void we are expanding into no matter what part of the earth I stand on and look up.
edit on 26-12-2015 by gflyg because: add on



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 12:59 AM
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We are not on the outside edge of the universe expanding into an empty void but between two great walls that are expanding with us. One such wall is called the CfA2 Great Wall.



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 01:09 AM
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a reply to: gflyg

You would have to describe what young means to you.




If the Big Bang started from one point shouldn't one person on one side of the globe see young galaxies


That might be true if we assumed we were near the edge.

The universe is too big to make assumptions like that.
edit on 26-12-2015 by rockintitz because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 01:16 AM
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a reply to: gflyg

Firstly, the universe is about 13.77 billion years old (and that's with an uncertainty of only 0.4%), so if you're seeing galaxies that are 13.8 billion years, report your findings and collect your Nobel prize.

Secondly, according to the theory of cosmic inflation, the entire universe’s size is at least 10^23 times larger than the size of the observable universe. So we don't know what is beyond the 'edge of the universe' because we simply aren't able to observe it (at this current time)

Thirdly, why is this in the Origin's and Creationism forum? Your questions don't seem to be based off of those topics, but more so from a scientific perspective alone.



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 01:17 AM
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originally posted by: AdmireTheDistance
a reply to: gflyg

First, you seem to be mistaking stars and galaxies for 'universes'. Second, there are stars and galaxies of varying ages in all directions. Some older than our galaxy, some younger. Pick up an astronomy/cosmology book sometime


There is only 1 universe, and it emcompasses everything and it's size is unknown (possibly infinite).

wiki says:

The Universe is all of time and space and its contents.[8][9][10][11] The Universe includes planets, stars, galaxies, the contents of intergalactic space, the smallest subatomic particles, and all matter and energy.



As to the thread, obviously we are not travelling independantly on the leading edge of space, but rather a part of a grouping or cluster of star systems that make up the Milky Way and part of that spiral pattern so we are surrounded by stars in all directions. I still don't understand how the universe is defined as "flat" when we observe something different.



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 01:28 AM
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a reply to: gflyg

You are aware galaxies can collide and make a "new" galaxy right?




If the Big Bang started from one point shouldn't one person on one side of the globe see young galaxies and the person on the other see the void we are expanding into?

Theoretically the universe expanded uniformly in every direction.
edit on 26-12-2015 by Vector99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 01:49 AM
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originally posted by: gflyg
Why is it when I look all around me all I see is young galaxies? If I put somebody on different points all around the globe and we all look straight up in the air we would all see young galaxies up to 13.8 billion light years away. Where is the void that we are expanding into? If the Big Bang started from one point shouldn't one person on one side of the globe see young galaxies and the person on the other see the void we are expanding into? Why am i surrounded by young galaxies? Where is the void that I am expanding into? Cuz when I look up and when I look down and when I look left and when I looked right all I see is young galaxies?

How can you reconcile the Reality that there is One (UNCHANGING, ALL inclusive) Universal Reality, and the "appearance" of 'motion' (which Zeno proved is impossible)?
Can what is constantly expanding NOT be the Universe (absurd notion!) but our Knowledge/experience of It? *__-



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 02:00 AM
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originally posted by: gflyg
Why is it when I look all around me all I see is young galaxies? If I put somebody on different points all around the globe and we all look straight up in the air we would all see young galaxies up to 13.8 billion light years away. Where is the void that we are expanding into? If the Big Bang started from one point shouldn't one person on one side of the globe see young galaxies and the person on the other see the void we are expanding into? Why am i surrounded by young galaxies? Where is the void that I am expanding into? Cuz when I look up and when I look down and when I look left and when I looked right all I see is young galaxies?


I am not sure where you are seeing this or have the idea that we are on the farthest edge of an expanding galaxy.

This has now been answered by several people.
edit on 26-12-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 02:20 AM
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a reply to: gflyg

Also, you should know the theoretical age of the Milky Way (our galaxy) is about 13.2 billion years old. I just learned that too. I actually was going to give you an example of a star in our galaxy older than it, but well I learned the oldest star in our galaxy is about the same age as the galaxy itself.

Source



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 05:43 AM
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originally posted by: gflyg
I've read alot of books but never heard them say if you look in this direction you Can see young galaxies where we first originated from and if you look this direction you Can see all older galaxies and the void we are expanding into. 13.8 billion light years in every direction I look. Looks like young galaxies from the Bering of time. So what direction are we expanding towards? Every direction I look I can see a galaxies that were forming at the becoming of the universe and there's not one direction I can look that shows me the void we are expanding into no matter what part of the earth I stand on and look up.

Let me try to make this as simple as possible for you. The universe is ridiculously huge, possibly even infinite. We simply don't know with 100% certainty because we cannot see far enough, but we can make some educated guesses and inferences. In every direction we look it's basically the same homogeneous layout. Of course if we look far away we see younger galaxies, but that's only because the light took longer to reach us. You also need to stop imagining the big bang as an explosion which sent things flying apart. The only reason galaxies appear to be moving apart today is because the space between galaxies is expanding. There isn't any center point which everything is moving away from, things are just getting further apart because space is expanding between them. But for large structures such as our galaxy, the immense gravity counteracts the expansion and prevents it from being pulled apart.
edit on 26/12/2015 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 05:49 AM
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a reply to: ChaoticOrder




Of course if we look far away we see younger galaxies

No, the distance of a galaxy doesn't determine its age.




The only reason galaxies appear to be moving apart today is because the space between galaxies is expanding

Galaxies exist in that same expanding space, they move with it whether they like it or not.



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 06:02 AM
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No, the distance of a galaxy doesn't determine its age.

That's not what I said, I said the galaxies look younger when we look further distances because the light took longer to reach us. Of course they aren't really that young in reality because they have aged during the time the light took to reach us.


Galaxies exist in that same expanding space, they move with it whether they like it or not.

You don't seem to understand how expansion works. It's caused by a negative pressure which causes it to stretch out. The energy which causes that pressure is called dark energy, meaning we don't know exactly what it is. Getting to my point, gravity exerts a positive pressure and causes things to be pulled together instead of pushed apart, thus it works against the effect of dark energy and the galaxy is able to hold its self together and remain stable. This is not my personal interpretation, this is what mainstream science teaches.
edit on 26/12/2015 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 06:07 AM
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a reply to: ChaoticOrder




I said the galaxies look younger

The visual appearance of a galaxy also doesn't determine it's age.




gravity exerts

Matter exerts gravity, not the other way around



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 06:09 AM
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think of soap bubbles. begs the question what is between the bubbles and gives them shape?


a reply to: mapsurfer_



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 06:11 AM
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a reply to: bottleslingguy
Air?



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 06:17 AM
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a reply to: Vector99

Are you just looking for an argument or something? I clearly said the visual appearance of a galaxy doesn't determine it's age. Also I didn't say gravity exerts mass, I said it exerts a positive pressure on space. I was going to explain how positive mass generates gravity with positive pressure but I thought it was not necessary. Now are you are done nitpicking?
edit on 26/12/2015 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 26 2015 @ 06:17 AM
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dark energy is what creates the electromagnetic radiation flowing through the universe and there are ways of tapping our technology into that. look at the structure of the known universe it looks like neurons. it is how we will eventually graduate to a Type I Civilization. it could happen tomorrow but the powers that be won't release their greedy fingers from fossil fuels, nukes and other toxic chemical reactions to make things go.


a reply to: ChaoticOrder




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