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Interesting light in the Nevada Sky last night...

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posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 12:20 AM
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Well our pal George Knapp got the scoop on it and here it is:
www.lasvegasnow.com...

At the end of the video George raises a great point, why the hell wouldn't "Sky Command" let the news agencies know that "some space debris" will be lighting up the night sky above millions of peoples' heads?

What is the deal with that?

It leads a thinking person to wonder doesn't it?




posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 12:36 AM
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a reply to: Springer

Well, remember Skylab when they told us it was coming in.

Idiots were wearing hard hats and acting like the world was ending.

Or, they are just not as good at tracking that stuff in re-entry ?

I'll leave that to you guys.

Interesting to watch where this goes...








edit on 24-12-2015 by whyamIhere because: (no reason given)

edit on 24-12-2015 by whyamIhere because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 12:41 AM
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a reply to: Springer

Was it ever determined exactly what this was?



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 12:47 AM
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What was the speed of the fireball?

If witnesses we seeing it from the ground for as long as 30 seconds and the sightings cover 3 states it seems to be moving relatively slowly.

Did it crash, disintegrate, or was it lost to sight heading out over the ocean?
edit on 24-12-2015 by abe froman because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 12:47 AM
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originally posted by: soulpowertothendegree
a reply to: Springer

Was it ever determined exactly what this was?


They blamed a Russian Rocket...

Also, that is what KFI Los Angeles reported.

I believe the article also referenced the rocket debris.



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 12:59 AM
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Lol this got me thinking, when are all the pollution advocates going to jump on space junk? Sorry if its distasteful but that's the first thing that came to mind. Now I wonder, when will the space junk tax come?



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 01:26 AM
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I hope it's space junk

But be mindful that Catalina
Just passed our sun
And it was a new comet
Lots and lots of loose rocks on it
And is now scattered all over
Solar system
And we will soon enter its tail

I need 100 layers of tin foil for my
Helmet
30kg plus flaming rocks are about
To fall from the sky



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 01:55 AM
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a reply to: Springer
Yes, I do wonder. When the explanation leads a local news team to appear skeptical, I really wonder then. Normally, news people like that would read what the government handed them and move on. The anchor didn't seem real sure.



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 02:33 AM
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George Knapp... A bastion of journalistic integrity.
Let us not forget that he first brought us the brilliance of Bob Lazar.



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 04:10 AM
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I didn't actually see speculation at the end, more like frustration, because they didn't get a phone call saying look up in the sky.

The object burned uniformly, man-made objects do that upon re-entering the atmosphere. They tend to last longer than a comet or meteor because the difference in speed, trajectory, and structural integrity of a man-made object is very different than a comet or meteor, so it usually doesn't blow up.



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 07:15 AM
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What I find even more intriguing is the fact that our fearless leader of this beloved site has had enough interest in this to take the time to post about it. THAT in itself makes me wonder all the more.



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 07:21 AM
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a reply to: Springer

I would definitely agree. Considering the amount of space debris and meteors that are being tracked on a daily basis, you would think anything they can identify entering our atmosphere, they would give the population a heads up. The idea that don't want to inform the public because they don't want to scare the population is really B.S.. Really? The majority of the public is that paranoid? Give me a break!

Don't forget all the mysterious noises and explosions people have heard over the past couple of years, yet the military and government agencies have remain silent. If they can't identify explosions that are shaking houses or noises that are extremely out of the ordinary, what does that say about this country's defense systems?

What I also find very odd is how news reporters will laugh these things off and clearly try to brush these unidentified objects as not being extraterrestrial in nature. It's like they are told to giggle or make lite of the situation. Lets face it, we have to rely on the military or NASA for explanations of these objects because nobody else has access to satellite imagery to clearly identify them. So if NASA or the military really wants to cover-up something entering our atmosphere, it's simply convenient to ignore it, or in this case when they are bombarded by numerous eyewitness accounts they'll give some explanation to satisfy the public. Whether it's true or false, who really knows?



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 07:28 AM
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originally posted by: WeRpeons
a reply to: Springer

I would definitely agree. Considering the amount of space debris and meteors that are being tracked on a daily basis, you would think anything they can identify entering our atmosphere, they would give the population a heads up.


They do

Are we so pampered we expect phone calls? What ever happened to "investigative" journalism.

ATS Thread



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 08:16 AM
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Here we go.
I hope this chart helps you identify what that might of been.



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 08:41 AM
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originally posted by: Vector99... The object burned uniformly, man-made objects do that upon re-entering the atmosphere. They tend to last longer than a comet or meteor because the difference in speed, trajectory, and structural integrity of a man-made object is very different than a comet or meteor, so it usually doesn't blow up.


Some large rocket body reentries put on a spectacular show that can elicit awesome misinterpretations from many witnesses, and wind up as classic UFO mothership reports -- here are examples ==
www.jamesoberg.com...



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 08:48 AM
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originally posted by: JimOberg

originally posted by: Vector99... The object burned uniformly, man-made objects do that upon re-entering the atmosphere. They tend to last longer than a comet or meteor because the difference in speed, trajectory, and structural integrity of a man-made object is very different than a comet or meteor, so it usually doesn't blow up.


Some large rocket body reentries put on a spectacular show that can elicit awesome misinterpretations from many witnesses, and wind up as classic UFO mothership reports -- here are examples ==
www.jamesoberg.com...

Exactly, if people would just do a little looking first, they might actually FIND the answers instead of waiting for someone to tell them it.

Thanks for the PDF, and the stop by Jim



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 08:50 AM
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originally posted by: WeRpeons
a reply to: Springer

I would definitely agree. Considering the amount of space debris and meteors that are being tracked on a daily basis, you would think anything they can identify entering our atmosphere, they would give the population a heads up. The idea that don't want to inform the public because they don't want to scare the population is really B.S.. Really? The majority of the public is that paranoid? Give me a break!


Impending satellite reentries like this one are routinely predicted on specialized websites, sorry you didn't get the personalized invitation.

Predicting WHOSE skies these will occur in is computationally impossible since the final drag effects of the nearly-horizontal trajectory depend on two non-predictable factors, the object's front-facing cross-sectional area [varying because it's usually tumbling] and the air density [varying hour-by-hour depending on solar energy flux]. Also, the actual mass of most space junk items isn't known either. So at best a range of time that covers several complete circuits around Earth is the best prediction you'll ever get == UNLESS the object is falling back from deep space on a steep angle like 'WTF' a few weeks back.

The folks at www.satobs.org anticipate and go out waiting to see reentries anyway, check them out.



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 09:04 AM
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originally posted by: Springer George raises a great point, why the hell wouldn't "Sky Command" let the news agencies know that "some space debris" will be lighting up the night sky above millions of peoples' heads?

What is the deal with that?

It leads a thinking person to wonder doesn't it?


it certainly does. maybe they just like watching the speculation roll in. maybe they made it all up because they didn't know for sure.



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 09:14 AM
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originally posted by: RoScoLaz4

originally posted by: Springer George raises a great point, why the hell wouldn't "Sky Command" let the news agencies know that "some space debris" will be lighting up the night sky above millions of peoples' heads?

What is the deal with that?

It leads a thinking person to wonder doesn't it?


it certainly does. maybe they just like watching the speculation roll in. maybe they made it all up because they didn't know for sure.

Except it was announced. Knapp didn't get a personal phone call, boohoo.



posted on Dec, 24 2015 @ 09:44 AM
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a reply to: grey580

People posting that picture thinking it is really funny is getting really stale.




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