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anyone got jumper cables Nasa could borrow?

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posted on Dec, 21 2015 @ 09:14 AM
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news.yahoo.com...
Just had to post this gem . Imange the guy holding cables hoping for a passing UFO to give him a jump start .
But i did hear they got it running after a second astronaut came out and helped push start it.
LOl well come on it is science . Ps we all know how hard it can be to start a car on a cold -10% winter day .
In space its -200 .




posted on Dec, 21 2015 @ 09:19 AM
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originally posted by: Midnightstar1365
news.yahoo.com...
Just had to post this gem . Imange the guy holding cables hoping for a passing UFO to give him a jump start .
But i did hear they got it running after a second astronaut came out and helped push start it.
LOl well come on it is science . Ps we all know how hard it can be to start a car on a cold -10% winter day .
In space its -200 .

Have they never heard of WD40 special!



posted on Dec, 21 2015 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: Midnightstar1365
They didn't say what caused it to get stuck. I was wondering if it could have been something like this cold welding?

Cold fusion around the ISS


Basically the video explains how two pieces of metal can stick together in space if there's no oxidized layer on the surface (which forms on Earth, but not in space).

It had nothing to do with needing jumper cables.

This post would probably be a better fit in the "Space Exploration" forum.


edit on 20151221 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Dec, 21 2015 @ 11:03 AM
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I wonder if that astronaut is "cool" enough to be able to start a jukebox by giving it a whack (a la Fonzie)?



posted on Dec, 21 2015 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People
This "cosmonaut" isn't as cool as "The Fonz" but he got it working by hitting it (in the movie). It's a tried and true technique that has worked for me at times though I never got a chance to try it in space:

THIS IS HOW WE FIX PROBLEMS ON RUSSIAN SPACE STATION!!!!!!

Time index: 30 seconds



posted on Dec, 21 2015 @ 01:38 PM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur
a reply to: Midnightstar1365
They didn't say what caused it to get stuck. I was wondering if it could have been something like this cold welding?

Cold fusion around the ISS


Basically the video explains how two pieces of metal can stick together in space if there's no oxidized layer on the surface (which forms on Earth, but not in space).

It had nothing to do with needing jumper cables.

This post would probably be a better fit in the "Space Exploration" forum.



That's interesting, it's a pity they don't make it clear how perfect the joint would be.
In explanation of what I mean, could you see the joins?...and how stable would that joint be?
Imagine building a spacecraft,(or anything else for that matter)...in space, and look! no joins.
edit on 21-12-2015 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Dec, 21 2015 @ 04:52 PM
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Vacuum welding is a real issue, quite difficult to solve. It's related to the way two Jo blocks stick together - if you remove the air sticking to the surface of metal, and if the metal surfaces touch over a fairly big surface area, they will almost always adhere.

Over time, you can get (depending on the metal) cold diffusion of one surface into the other and then you are in trouble, cause it's not going to want to come loose.




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