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Unique Hebrew inscription found at Galilee

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posted on Dec, 20 2015 @ 05:21 AM
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a reply to: beansidhe

Our Folklore ?

Speak for yourself sister
To most people this is Jewish mythology




posted on Dec, 20 2015 @ 06:08 AM
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a reply to: Marduk

Our human folklore, brother.

Hope you have a wonderful Christmas.

B x



posted on Dec, 20 2015 @ 06:59 AM
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originally posted by: beansidhe
a reply to: Marduk

Our human folklore, brother.

Hope you have a wonderful Christmas.

B x


Its not Christmas, its Zagmuk



posted on Dec, 20 2015 @ 07:22 AM
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originally posted by: Marduk
Its not Christmas, its Zagmuk


That's vernal equinox, not winter solstice. Winter solstice is of most significance to those of us that live above the 47th parallel north, Spring equinox for those below the 47th parallel but above the equator. The Levant is the mixing pot all of Eurasia has at some point dipped their ideological toe in, and much swapping obviously went on, but technically, Christ's a Northerner, calendar wise.




posted on Dec, 20 2015 @ 08:41 AM
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originally posted by: Anaana

originally posted by: Marduk
Its not Christmas, its Zagmuk


That's vernal equinox, not winter solstice. Winter solstice is of most significance to those of us that live above the 47th parallel north, Spring equinox for those below the 47th parallel but above the equator. The Levant is the mixing pot all of Eurasia has at some point dipped their ideological toe in, and much swapping obviously went on, but technically, Christ's a Northerner, calendar wise.



Didn't you ever wonder why the new year starts in January, which is still the middle of winter



People didn’t always celebrate the new year on January 1. The earliest recording of a new year celebration is believed to have been in Mesopotamia, circa 2000 B.C. That celebration – and many other ancient celebrations of the new year following it – were celebrated around the time of the vernal equinox, around March 20. Meanwhile, the ancient Egyptians, Phoenicians, and Persians began their new year with the autumnal equinox around September 20. And the ancient Greeks celebrated on the winter solstice, around December 20.

By the Middle Ages, though, in many places the new year began in March. Around the 16th century, a movement developed to restore January 1 as New Year’s Day. In the New Style or Gregorian calendar, the New Year begins on the first of January.

Bottom line: There’s no astronomical reason to celebrate New Year’s Day on January 1. Instead, our modern New Year’s celebration stems from the ancient, two-faced, Roman god Janus – for whom the month of January is also named. One face of Janus looked back into the past, and the other peered forward to the future.


earthsky.org...



posted on Dec, 20 2015 @ 09:06 AM
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originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: beansidhe
a reply to: Marduk

Our human folklore, brother.

Hope you have a wonderful Christmas.

B x


Its not Christmas, its Zagmuk


I found you a Zagmuk card!! I'm so pleased - merry Zagmuk!



eta:

And jumper!!




edit on 20-12-2015 by beansidhe because: extra gifts



posted on Dec, 20 2015 @ 09:25 AM
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originally posted by: beansidhe

originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: beansidhe
a reply to: Marduk

Our human folklore, brother.

Hope you have a wonderful Christmas.

B x


Its not Christmas, its Zagmuk


I found you a Zagmuk card!! I'm so pleased - merry Zagmuk!



eta:

And jumper!!





This is the nicest thing that's ever happened to me on this website

thankyou so much



posted on Dec, 20 2015 @ 10:14 AM
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originally posted by: Marduk

Didn't you ever wonder why the new year starts in January, which is still the middle of winter




I never wonder for long, I learn instead, and read carefully.

Did you not see the "calendar wise"?

If you look towards Newgrange, etc, you will see that, in the North, the shortest day was closely associated with death, (and new life presumably/possibly), out with the old and in with the new. Christ's birth was moved to coincide with the division of the year in the Northern hemisphere because that is where the calendar setters were. Just as the Mardukian calendar was set to what was most important to the Mesopotamians.



posted on Dec, 20 2015 @ 10:39 AM
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originally posted by: Anaana

originally posted by: Marduk

Didn't you ever wonder why the new year starts in January, which is still the middle of winter




I never wonder for long, I learn instead, and read carefully.

Did you not see the "calendar wise"?

If you look towards Newgrange, etc, you will see that, in the North, the shortest day was closely associated with death, (and new life presumably/possibly), out with the old and in with the new. Christ's birth was moved to coincide with the division of the year in the Northern hemisphere because that is where the calendar setters were. Just as the Mardukian calendar was set to what was most important to the Mesopotamians.



That's wholly irrelevant
The Babylonian New Year was in March
These days we celebrate the new year in January because of Julius Caesar
Before Caesar New Year was in March
After Caesar it is in January
Zagmuk predates Caesar
So its perfectly fine to move a Babylonian New year ceremony, to the current civilisations New Year date
Either way, as I am a Babylonian pantheist, I guess its my call what I want to call the New year


What you are suggesting, is that I should wait until March to celebrate my New year ceremony
I don't think my boss would give me the time off



posted on Dec, 20 2015 @ 10:48 AM
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originally posted by: Marduk
What you are suggesting, is that I should wait until March to celebrate my New year ceremony
I don't think my boss would give me the time off




No, but I may be inclined to suggest that you have started your celebrations a little early, unless your ability to comprehend is always this limited. You can start your year whenever you damn like, but the Mesopotamians started theirs with the Spring equinox, while those in the North started their celebrations with the shortest day, or winter equinox...following so far?

The calendar is a standardised rule of measurement. The New Year, as we follow today was dispersed largely through colonialism. It is a rule, and up to you whether you follow it, it is simply a means by which we measure the passage of time, it is not subject to the same environmental observations as the Mardukian or the calendars that preceed the Julian and Gregorian. So, if you want to mix and match, go for it, [snip].


edit on 20/12/15 by masqua because: edited personal attack on a fellow member


(post by Marduk removed for a manners violation)
(post by Anaana removed for a manners violation)

posted on Dec, 21 2015 @ 02:47 AM
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OK, folks, we're going to try a little something called polite conversation.

That does not include, just so you know, commentary on peoples cognitive abilities.

Now then, let's try it again, shall we?



posted on Dec, 21 2015 @ 06:19 PM
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mar it rabbi , now i know how the mayor and the major



posted on Dec, 21 2015 @ 06:33 PM
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I don't agree or disagree with you OP. But engraving, anything back then, was a lot of work!
Apparently, it was a work, they felt was "worth" engraving.
The laziness of the unbelieving is staggering.

Somebody etched this out in stone'!
Modern "educated" will chalk it/this up to a lack of medications.



posted on Dec, 22 2015 @ 08:29 AM
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a reply to: beansidhe

Perfect. Thank the Lord God of Heaven. In these dreary and increasingly dark days, I believe more and more evidence will be brought to the world's attention that proves the word of God and his son Jesus to be true. Evil runs rampant and seemingly unimpeded, but God still holds all the good playing cards...


First Hezekiah's seal, Sodom and Gomorrah, and now this.

edit on 22-12-2015 by kef33890 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2015 @ 03:30 PM
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a reply to: dashen

It was a willing and necessary sacrifice to atone for sins. He didn't fight it, so the struggle idea doesn't apply.

But judge out of context.

If a country's economy is going under, just make more money right?



posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 01:27 PM
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a reply to: dashen

Since when was might right anyway? Tell it to the Nazis? Your comments reflect a massive lack of respect, and even basic humanity - do you realise that men & women are being crucified in the Middle East by ISIS at this very time? That the children of those so murdered are being abused horribly & sold into slavery, or just killed to be rid of the burden? Crucify Him? He showed us what monsters we can be, even while reaching out to us - the same who received His blessing caused His suffering.

He came to show compassion & humility, reverence even for the Human condition, equanimity with the sons of men - calling us brothers & sisters, even though He is king. He calls for compassion among the ranks of men, proper weights & measures, care for those who cannot care for themselves, humility & reverence before God, so that we may receive from the hand of heaven what is needed while we walk the Earth.. Even to the measure of defying nature, in some cases - more mysterious than we can comprehend - like the edges of the Universe, the knowledge is beyond our reach.

I suggest you tread more respectfully before the beliefs of others, because they are not without thousands of years of sacrifice & persecution behind them, or the heartfelt prayer & supplication, the sufferings which afflict so many, in so many unexpected circumstances. I'm not talking about respecting the corporate Catholicism which butchered the very name of Christ with its imperiousness in the dark ages - I'm talking about the hundreds of thousands of believers who became martyrs - who, despite lives of humble service to their communities, were even boiled in oil simply for refusing to recant belief in the Son of God. Your 2x4 comment is sickening.



posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: FlyInTheOintment

All I'm saying is if I were the son of an all-powerful God I probably wouldn't be a scrawny little Jew who couldn't fight off guys nailing me to a piece of wood.
And if you're going to try to convince me that it was a sacrifice for the sins of whoever then why were his last words why have you forsaken me?



posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 01:52 PM
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a reply to: dashen

From the way you're interpreting His purpose in this life, I can see you don't have a clue what you're talking about.

As for 'scrawny little jew', well that is pretty outrageous, and I think someone should be reporting you to the mods for that one. But anyway, He was a carpenter, worked with wood every day, back-breaking work which certainly wouldn't have left Him 'scrawny'. Even then, if you think He was up for 'fighting off' the ones who crucified Him, you again have no idea what His ministry was all about. The thing is, He came in the way He did to prove that your theory of supremacy is bull$h%t. He didn't want to fight off the Romans, or the Pharisees, because He came to show that another way exists, that might isn't right, that we are instead to look to God for inspiration on how to live our lives. The Old Testament is summed up in one edict: That we work justice, love mercy, and walk humbly with God as shepherd of our lives. The New Testament is the story of how Jesus came to fulfil the ministry of the Messiah (the anointed One, God made into Man). He was here for the purpose of enlightening our spirits with His Spirit, and restoring relations with God through simple approval of Him, faith in Him.. He said: "He who is not against us, is for us". That means that by simply not going against His precepts, even if we weren't hardcore followers, then we had a part in His kingdom, the true & Universal kingdom, more powerful than any of the darkness of Earth can conquer.

His last words were indicative of His being exposed to a full & true understanding of what it meant to be eternally cut off from the presence of God. In that moment, the weight of that reality was laid upon Him, even though He hadn't done anything to deserve such horror. He was made human in every way, and had to experience the terrors of night in order to rescue those who were bound by it, once His resurrection life/power came into fruition. As in, the story goes that after death, He went to the UNderworld, to Hell, and took away the jailer's keys - so that dark powers no longer had authority over the soul of mankind (we lost the keys back in the murky mists of time, when 'Adam' (allegory) sold us into bondage..)

So hopefully it puts your comments into perspective.




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