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Nasa releases stunning new image of Earth taken from a spacecraft orbiting the moon

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posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 01:24 PM
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a reply to: NewzNose



Couldn't get a single decent pic?


The images that would match what you would see from the Moon are here, the Chang'e 3 camera lens matches the characteristics of the human eye. Not quite as impressive.
moon.bao.ac.cn...




posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 02:22 PM
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originally posted by: ngchunter

originally posted by: NewzNose



"The image was composed from a series of images".
a reply to: RoScoLaz4

Why?

Couldn't get a single decent pic?

That's not how the LRO narrow angle camera works. It scans line by line. I knew the instant I saw that this was released and from LRO that it would spawn all kinds of misunderstandings, misconceptions, and problems in general. It's sad but I now groan every time NASA releases a public relations pic like this from a scientific instrument like LROC.


You should be groaning at the fact not one nice clear picture of the moon landing exists after 40 years....but somehow you would rather not and claim that they do "not need too".

The most interesting story of space EVER, and of course no need to take further pictures with something near to the surface or whatever it would take to make one.

It appears that almost everything they do is fantasy land, and that is why it will *STAY* as fantasy, and no one from earth will ever even go to see the flag, either.



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: ParasuvO

Apollo 12 LRO
Apollo 17 LRO



Full Article:
NASA Spacecraft Images Offer Sharper Views of Apollo Landing Sites





edit on 12/19/2015 by EternalSolace because: Corrected image link and added image.



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 02:33 PM
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What an absolutely amazing picture of our little blue planet we call Earth!!! Absolutely breathtaking! And when you think about the fact that there are zillions of other galaxies out there besides this one, it blows my mind.



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: tsurfer2000h

I find it strange that a body the size of the moon could be in the sky and we couldn't see it approaching the sun .could planet x be there and we couldn't see it either ?



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 02:38 PM
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originally posted by: EternalSolace
a reply to: ParasuvO

Apollo 17 from LRO

Full Article:
NASA Spacecraft Images Offer Sharper Views of Apollo Landing Sites


But alas, these are probably fake too...





The first link is Apollo 12, not 17.



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 02:39 PM
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a reply to: eNumbra




That's because the moon is really just the back of the sun.
The problem I see there is that ,there are times when you can see the moon in the daytime .



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 02:48 PM
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originally posted by: onebigmonkey

The first link is Apollo 12, not 17.



Thanks! It's been corrected.



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: GaryN

There are very few true pics of the Earth. Most are renditions or complitations.



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 03:22 PM
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I read the last 7 pages of the thread to catch up.
I did some face palms.
I shook my head.
I grinned.
Yay ATS.
Thanks for entertaining me for a bit!



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 03:33 PM
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originally posted by: ngchunter
a reply to: imd12c4funn

What you believe is irrelevant. Yes, NASA took real pictures of earth. No, Bob Ross' paintings have no equivalency with photos from LRO, regardless of the stitching and image processing. Every astrophoto you have ever seen has been processed to one extent or another, but that does not mean it's as fake as a Bob Ross painting. They even show the video on the LRO website of the raw wide angle camera images as it scans the surface of the earth and moon. It's quite real, just processed together to represent one moment of time from that scan.

It's fundamentally no different than stacking an image of a comet moving through space. If stacked on the stars and on the comet and composited it represents just one moment in time from the original imaging session, but it comes from a range of images covering a span of time where the comet was actually moving relative to the stars. If you simply added the photos together without any other processing the comet would be a blur, just as earth would be a blur if you stabilized on the moon's surface and didn't do any other processing to create the image.


Despite what you say, it looks no different than the moon in any videogame, with 2007 graphics.

It takes away an awe or inspiration looking at it, when you can clearly see its nothing like what it would look like with human eyes.

How is it, that these computer simulations are so cartoony ????



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 04:03 PM
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a reply to: ParasuvO

I'm not sure which part of 'it is not a computer simulation' has escaped you.



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 05:04 PM
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originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: jonnywhite

Yes, the terminator is where the light ends.


Check this image of the Moon I've taken:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

You can see the craters from Earth. The biggest is the Copernicus Crater, which has ejectas spanning half way across the moon, and you can see it with the naked eyes.


Is it my eyes or is this moon "rotating" or changing angle or something? It's approx time-lapse over a less than 6 hour period:
If you skip ahead to near the end you can see the moon seems to have "rotated" or something. That can't be.

I looked here trying to figure out what it's:
news.discovery.com - Why Doesn't the Moon Spin?...

The orbit of the moon is tilted very slightly to the plane of the Earth's orbit around the sun, which means that during periods of its orbit, the moon is 'lower' than usual and at other times it is 'higher.' During these periods we can see a little further over the north and south poles of the moon but only by a small amount. This is known as 'libration in latitude.'

The elliptical nature of the orbit of the moon means its speed varies, as described nicely by Kepler's Law's of motion. Because of the varying speed we can sometimes see slightly further around the eastern and western horizon, a phenomenon known as 'liberation in longitude.'

These two effects allow observers from Earth to see a total of 59 percent of the moon's surface as it orbits us.

Is that tied to it? And I've read different places on Earth see a different angle of the moon. Know about that?
edit on 12/19/2015 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 05:49 PM
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a reply to: jonnywhite
The rotation you see there is caused by the rotation of the Earth. Imagine the apparent motion of Orion over that same amount of time, ''climbing the mountain and going down the other side".



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 07:22 PM
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a reply to: DenyObfuscation
Hmm, you mean as it's climbing up it's at one angle and as it goes down it's at another? Like constellations? Well I haven't sky watched for years, so I just wasn't thinking straight. You must be right.

It's hard to visualize. I remember I was looking at the milky way arm and I felt dizzy. For a moment felt like it was 3d, you know? But most of the time it's hard to grasp being on a planet spinning. I used to run some planetarium software when I was star watching, but it has been years. It's funny how something so essential is so easy for me to miss.
edit on 12/19/2015 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 08:17 PM
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originally posted by: NewzNose
a reply to: GaryN

There are very few true pics of the Earth. Most are renditions or complitations.


What would make you believe that's the case?



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 08:24 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
I read the last 7 pages of the thread to catch up.
I did some face palms.
I shook my head.
I grinned.
Yay ATS.
Thanks for entertaining me for a bit!


Alas. It has the same entertainment value for me. I have to be careful not to squirt coffee from my nose.

Still, it's a lot of fun to watch these moon/hoaxers and (especially) flat earthers. I have a hard time believing that they ACTUALLY believe what they are saying/arguing. I think it's all some kind of game.



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 08:55 PM
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originally posted by: MteWamp

originally posted by: butcherguy
I read the last 7 pages of the thread to catch up.
I did some face palms.
I shook my head.
I grinned.
Yay ATS.
Thanks for entertaining me for a bit!


Alas. It has the same entertainment value for me. I have to be careful not to squirt coffee from my nose.

Still, it's a lot of fun to watch these moon/hoaxers and (especially) flat earthers. I have a hard time believing that they ACTUALLY believe what they are saying/arguing. I think it's all some kind of game.


I think that a good number of people who are in the Flat Earth Society are just there because they like a good argument and want to test their skills.

Here on ATS, however . . . .



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 09:29 PM
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a reply to: NewzNose

a reply to: GaryN

"There are very few true pics of the Earth. Most are renditions or complitations. "

The Chang'e images are real, and show what you would see by eye, including intensity. I do have to wonder though why they never use zoom lenses. Like to see the view from a Nikon Coolpix P900 on the Moon. Against the black of space it should be amazing.
www.popphoto.com...



posted on Dec, 19 2015 @ 10:06 PM
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I think the image looks "funny", as in odd, but I don't know why. However, I checked for some images related to the true shape of the earth and came up with this (from 2011). A planet only an alien could love.

www.dailygalaxy.com...


After two years in orbit, the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) is nearing the end of its planned life span in February, producing the most accurate map ever of the so-called geoid -- an Earth-encompassing spirit level and global reference surface. An unused supply of xeon fuel will allow the mission to be extended until at least the end of 2012.




Do we have a problem? Is the earth in the OP's picture too round, from that vantage point?

Screen grab from vid:



Screen grab from OP's pic:




edit on 19-12-2015 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)



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