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Nasa releases stunning new image of Earth taken from a spacecraft orbiting the moon

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posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 04:38 PM
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a reply to: HardBoiled

The LRO photo was taken at the terminator between light and dark, on an orbit that has a low of 31 miles. The Apollo 8 photograph was taken at roughly twice that altitude, on the sunlit side of the moon. The altitude difference makes a completely different look to the moon with regards to shadows.




posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: HardBoiled

Other posts here on space subjects.

edit on 12/18/2015 by roadgravel because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 04:49 PM
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originally posted by: HardBoiled

Where are all those shadows in this pic?

And why is the horizon completely covered by shadow in the op pic?


1: It's not the same area of the Moon that is being photographed. Just like on Earth, the Moon has flat areas and mountains in some other areas.

2: The angle of the Sun is different (look at Earth's illumination angle if you don't believe me).

3: The distance between the camera and the ground is different.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 04:56 PM
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The Apollo 8 photograph was taken at roughly twice that altitude, on the sunlit side of the moon. The altitude difference makes a completely different look to the moon with regards to shadows.


Like Long shadows opposed to no shadows at all?

So how does LRO orbit the moon? in what direction and angle?



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 05:07 PM
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a reply to: HardBoiled

The LRO is in an eccentric polar mapping orbit. It's traveling from the North Pole to the South Pole. It's actually even lower than 31 miles. In May the descended as low as 12 miles over the South Pole of the moon.

lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov...



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 05:08 PM
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Link with detailed information about how that image was made: lroc.sese.asu.edu...

~~~

And if the Sun is shining on the surface top-down, there will be no shadows.

Beggars belief how people can be ignorant about the simplest things in life (such as using a telephoto lens to make the Moon appear bigger).



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 05:16 PM
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originally posted by: HardBoiled



The Apollo 8 photograph was taken at roughly twice that altitude, on the sunlit side of the moon. The altitude difference makes a completely different look to the moon with regards to shadows.


Like Long shadows opposed to no shadows at all?

So how does LRO orbit the moon? in what direction and angle?

Try reading the thread.

originally posted by: ngchunter

originally posted by: LSU0408
a reply to: HardBoiled

That's what has me bugged as well... Even at a different position you should see some shadows in the real picture

No. Not unless you're over the lunar terminator. Apollo was NEVER in a polar lunar orbit. LRO is in a polar lunar orbit so that it can map the whole surface of the moon. It will therefore ALWAYS view earthrise as it crosses the lunar terminator. Think about it. As it comes over from the far side of the moon it (pretty much) has to be relatively near one of the poles. The line of the lunar terminator will also always intersect a point somewhere near the pole and therefore the sun will be at a much lower angle and you'll see much longer shadows than usually seen when viewing earthrise from an equatorial or even an inclined but non-polar orbit of the moon. In order to get a shot from a non-polar orbit of earthrise with significant shadows like that you would have to time it juuust right so that the terminator was located right at the limb of the moon as seen from earth so that you would be over the terminator as earth rises. That's far less likely and I don't know that that was ever the case for an Apollo earthrise shot.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 05:23 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
I have to question that picture as to if it was really Taken or Faken.

The distance is too close for a moon shot. there is no atmosphere to cause an enlargement like we have for the moon and even then we don't get that close of a look at mountain ranges on the moon as this picture shows.

Something is amiss here.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

The LRO was down to 12 miles at one point.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Looks very similar to this one taken from the ESA satellite. They look similar in position and the size could have been manipulated. so this could be a hoax

www.nairaland.com...

i.huffpost.com...




edit on 18-12-2015 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 05:38 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

The size is totally different in both of them. The shape is, of course, going to be similar. If you look at the two though the clouds are different in the two of them.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 05:40 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: ChesterJohn

The size is totally different in both of them. The shape is, of course, going to be similar. If you look at the two though the clouds are different in the two of them.


But it is virtually impossible for two or more pictures to have Africa in the exact same position as they do in all these photos including this supposed moon shot

look for yourself

www.google.com...# tbm=isch&q=pictures+of+africa+from+space&imgrc=_



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 05:41 PM
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Try reading the thread.
a reply to: ngchunter

I read every post including yours.

I am asking what the exact orbit is. Your post does not contain this information.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 05:43 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Why? If they were taken at about the same time of year then Africa would be in about the same place. The earth doesn't move that much, that fast.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 05:47 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I see at least three picture all supposedly taken from different craft at different times of the year and they all have Africa in the exact same position.

I am suspicious someone has photoshopped some additional clouds to is via masking.

the odd of just three photo's in the exact same position from different times in a million to one.



edit on 18-12-2015 by ChesterJohn because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 05:48 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn




But it is virtually impossible for two or more pictures to have Africa in the exact same position as they do in all these photos including this supposed moon shot


I am also wondering how this view is possible with a polar orbit, while crossing the lunar terminator and with Africa, and the Earrh in a more or less horizontal position like a globe.

I am having a hard time picturing it.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 06:10 PM
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a reply to: HardBoiled

NASA Releases New High-Resolution Earthrise Image


This image was composed from a series of images taken Oct. 12, when LRO was about 83 miles (134 kilometers) above the moon's farside crater Compton.


That crater is on the moon's northern hemisphere.


First the spacecraft must be rolled to the side (in this case 67 degrees), then the spacecraft slews with the direction of travel to maximize the width of the lunar horizon in LROC's Narrow Angle Camera image.


The LRO is rolled over to get the angles and orientation you're seeing.


The Earth may not move across the 'sky', but the view is not static. Future astronauts will see the continents rotate in and out of view and the ever-changing pattern of clouds will always catch one's eye, at least on the nearside. The Earth is never visible from the farside; imagine a sky with no Earth or moon - what will farside explorers think with no Earth overhead?"


Earth's continents drift in and out of view while looking at the earth from the moon.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 06:24 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace




That crater is on the moon's northern hemisphere.


Obviously, a view like that from the southern hemisphere would be impossible beyond doubt.




The LRO is rolled over to get the angles and orientation you're seeing.


This has nothing to do with the Earth/Moon angles in the pic. This is simply positioning the camera to make the best shot.




Earth's continents drift in and out of view while looking at the earth from the moon.


This also has nothing to do with what i said.





edit on 18-12-2015 by HardBoiled because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: HardBoiled


Obviously, a view like that from the southern hemisphere would be impossible beyond doubt.


No, it wouldn't. It's all in how the LRO is oriented.


This has nothing to do with the Earth/Moon angles in the pic. This is simply positioning the camera to make the best shot.


It has everything to do with the angles in the picture. If the LRO wasn't rolled, you'd have an "upside down" earth or the craters at the top of the picture.


This also has nothing to do with what I said.


It doesn't? Let me remind you of what all you just called into question...


I am also wondering how this view is possible with a polar orbit, while crossing the lunar terminator and with Africa, and the Earrh in a more or less horizontal position like a globe.


You said that you couldn't imagine how that view of Africa is possible, let alone to have it in a "horizontal position like a globe". I've merely explained to you how it's possible in my post to help you imagine it.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 06:37 PM
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a reply to: LSU0408
I would probably think,this planet is much too nice for these barbaric savages called humans they don`t take care of the planet,let`s wipe them out and claim the planet for ourselves.


edit on 18-12-2015 by Tardacus because: (no reason given)




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