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Being angry in the workplace can be beneficial, academic says

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posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 10:46 PM
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Being angry in the workplace can be beneficial, academic says

Based on the title, I place this in the realm of Science. Now, I am aware that "academic says" does not equate to any real or imagined "science" (but than what does...????). This looks to be the OPINION of one person, "academic says" would lead me to that conclusion.... do I care about the opinion of one man (or woman), no I do not.

Do I care about the opinion of a person that the media calls "academic" ??? No I do not, this is just more false authority that is being sold. In short, this is TOTAL BS.... but I open the discussion to my fellow ATSers.

True, or false? and why????

Here is the quote:


A university academic has called upon employers to embrace anger in the workplace, arguing that it plays a vital role in keeping the environment fair.

Dr Dirk Lindebaum, from the University of Liverpool’s Management School, has said that "moral anger" stands apart from other forms of anger, which are more routinely associated with negative traits like aggression, hostility or bullying.

In seeking to reduce all indignation, employers miss out on the “more socially-functional, adaptive and fairness-enhancing components” of the emotion, Dr Lindebaum contends.

He argues that increasingly, the emotion is cast as an expression of deviant, harmful behaviour, a dismissal which detracts from ‘moral’ anger - which is defined as when one’s actions are viewed as ultimately beneficial to society in general, possibly putting oneself at some risk.


i100.independent.co.uk...


In the Journal of Organisational Behaviour, alongside Temple University’s Dr Deanna Geddes, Dr Lindebaum wrote:



Allowing morally-motivated anger to be expressed can serve as a tool of organisational diagnosis to better our individual and collective behaviours.

Moral anger serves to avoid harm while improving upon or removing an unacceptable situation that violates important moral values.

By prompting helping behaviour, moral anger attempts to reconcile disparity, repair damaging situations, restore equity and improve the human condition.




posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 11:45 PM
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Of course it's beneficial. Only a fool would think all anger is destructive.

"Your anger is a gift" -Zach dela Rocha



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 12:05 AM
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a reply to: ringdingdong

Not if you have high blood pressure it's not.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 01:03 AM
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I've noted the french hold it high in value. It was actually from them that I began to form a concept of positive aggression. Before that, I was pretty much taught that aggression is synonymous with hostility and violence, and there is no appropriate place for it, ever.

But here, they see it primarily as the way those lower on the hierarchy keep the powerful ones from getting too corrupt and unfair. It is important for employees to get mad, often, and express it.
But I came from an environment in which having a position of power indicates ethical superiority as well as material, so you aren't expected to object to them in any moral way - only worship and obey.

Though maybe I'm not reading it right, but this article seems to suggest it is employers that should free themselves up to express more moral indignation and anger..?? Employees should be what? MORE submissive and passive??



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 01:10 AM
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a reply to: ringdingdong

It's not the anger that's the problem. It's what you do with it.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 02:29 AM
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originally posted by: ZeussusZ
a reply to: ringdingdong

It's not the anger that's the problem. It's what you do with it.


I was mad at my boss today, so I came home and punched the wall. Now I have bloody swollen knuckles. Why I would do something stupid like that? I don't know... maybe it is the bad examples in my life who tend to immediate. Like everyone else on this planet I do what is familiar to me, even it hurt me.

The good news I didn't damage the wall. I expected to put a whole in the dry-wall but it turns out that wall is concrete. Opps. That hurt. Yes, I would like to stop hurting myself. That is one of my goals for the new year. However, today I got angry and I expressed it a way that was both hurtful to myself, and completely ineffective in solving my problem.

Could I have express my anger at work in a way that was more appropriate? Perhaps, but I'm just not sure what that would be exactly. There is the story: I work in sales room where every other person has done jail time and everyone drinks coffee and smokes a cigarette or two each break. In this environment there is a lot of profanity and trash talk. Yesterday a new manager start the job. Don't know his name yet, but he used to work the phones there a year ago.

So this guy asked me why I went to bathroom so much.

I thought to myself, that is now of your damn business. I wanted to say that (with anger) but I held my tongue. So what is the right way to address this anger/rage I feel toward this "little boss" while I am at work? Do I go to him man to man, eye to eye and say "Listen Dude, something you said yesterday made me angry and I want to talk to you about it." Or OPTION TWO, do I just skip past that (because I have zero respect for this clown) and go directly to his boss. This approach seem most effective and the less hurtful to myself, but I am temped with the nuclear option: OPTION THREE: do I go to the HR department and express my "moral anger" to them in no uncertain terms.

How do I express my anger (at work) without hurting myself (losing my job)?

If your advice it to get a better job, duh. I know that already, so please don't doge the question. Think about what you would do if you have to keep a crappy job like this one until after Christmas.... how does one express "moral anger" in the work place in such a way it is both well-received (you keep your job) and constructive (actually improves the environment) for everyone???

And answer needs to fulfill two requirements:
1) I need to express my anger in a way that does not hurt me.
2) I'm looking for a win-win solution, and a better working environment for all parties.

Things to avoid:
1) seeking vengeance for past grievances,
2) taking pleasure in hurting someone else.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 02:33 AM
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originally posted by: wasaka

originally posted by: ZeussusZ
a reply to: ringdingdong

It's not the anger that's the problem. It's what you do with it.


I was mad at my boss today, so I came home and punched the wall. Now I have bloody swollen knuckles. Why I would do something stupid like that? I don't know... maybe it is the bad examples in my life who I tend to immediate. Like everyone else on this planet I do what is familiar to me, even it hurt me. I see injustice and then I perpetuate injustice. Monkey see, monkey do.

The good news I didn't damage the wall. I expected to put a whole in the dry-wall but it turns out that wall is concrete. Opps. That hurt. Yes, I would like to stop hurting myself. That is one of my goals for the new year. However, today I got angry and I expressed it a way that was both hurtful to myself, and completely ineffective in solving my problem.

Could I have express my anger at work in a way that was more appropriate? Perhaps, but I'm just not sure what that would be exactly. There is the story: I work in sales room where every other person has done jail time and everyone drinks coffee and smokes a cigarette or two each break. In this environment there is a lot of profanity and trash talk. Yesterday a new manager start the job. Don't know his name yet, but he used to work the phones there a year ago.

So this guy asked me why I went to bathroom so much.

I thought to myself, that is now of your damn business. I wanted to say that (with anger) but I held my tongue. So what is the right way to address this anger/rage I feel toward this "little boss" while I am at work? Do I go to him man to man, eye to eye and say "Listen Dude, something you said yesterday made me angry and I want to talk to you about it." Or OPTION TWO, do I just skip past that (because I have zero respect for this clown) and go directly to his boss. This approach seem most effective and the less hurtful to myself, but I am temped with the nuclear option: OPTION THREE: do I go to the HR department and express my "moral anger" to them in no uncertain terms.

How do I express my anger (at work) without hurting myself (losing my job)?

If your advice it to get a better job, duh. I know that already, so please don't doge the question. Think about what you would do if you have to keep a crappy job like this one until after Christmas.... how does one express "moral anger" in the work place in such a way it is both well-received (you keep your job) and constructive (actually improves the environment) for everyone???

And answer needs to fulfill two requirements:
1) I need to express my anger in a way that does not hurt me.
2) I'm looking for a win-win solution, and a better working environment for all parties.

Things to avoid:
1) seeking vengeance for past grievances,
2) taking pleasure in hurting someone else.









posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 06:35 AM
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originally posted by: ZeussusZ
a reply to: ringdingdong

It's not the anger that's the problem. It's what you do with it.


For sure. That's what the article is about.

I've expressed moral outrage numerous times in my life. The only time this has really backfired is when dealing with individuals who have swiss-chess for a conscience while being surrounded by emotionally retarded dimwits. Your best bet is to back away in that situation. Moral outrage will seem as if an act of aggression devoid of reason, and the potential for a feedback loop on your part may give rise to temporary insanity. Break the loop, walk away!



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 10:02 AM
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originally posted by: Bluesma
I've noted the french hold it high in value. It was actually from them that I began to form a concept of positive aggression. Before that, I was pretty much taught that aggression is synonymous with hostility and violence, and there is no appropriate place for it, ever.
(...)


As a man with French blood, I can attest- Anger is a strong driving force, and if used constructively it is very effective in getting one through many situations. If done right, you can even have entire relationships based on anger.

In the work place? I didn't think there was another way to work until I got this job. It's really bizarre to me to be surrounded by people being nice to one another at work.

Anger is, after all, more useful than despair.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 11:03 PM
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originally posted by: ringdingdong
Of course it's beneficial. Only a fool would think all anger is destructive.

"Your anger is a gift" -Zach dela Rocha


I read that quote this morning before I left
my domicile, and headed out my door into
the land of the #TaxSlave and #WorkerBees.

I read that quote again just now (8hrs later)
and the meaning of that word had changed.
Why? Because I had just experienced a shift
change in my consciousness a few seconds
earlier. This Paradigm Shift, if I accept it,
will flip my whole upside-down world right
the F*CK right-side up!

The funny thing is I didn't know my mind
had changed until I read this quote for the
second time and it struck me like a bolt of
fire from the the sky.... I can see Zeus as he
throws down his Blots from Mt Olympus.

"Your anger is a gift" -Zach dela Rocha

Wow. Who is this Rocha person? I must do my
research immediately. What a sublime truth.
It is so incredibility liberating to my soul it
makes me want to cry, and allow the healing
effect to wash all over my pain body.

Like the LIGHT from Source.
Like the Star Light so Bright.
the Ember of Acceptance.

Yes, we can manifest love and healing for
ourselves (and for the whole of humanity)
while we live in a Angry Relationship that
is full of chaos and drama.

I never imagined such was possible.

Now I know is it.

Wow.

...that is a powerful paradigm shift.



verb (used with object), allied, allying.
1.
to unite formally, as by treaty, league, marriage, or the like (usually followed by with or to):
Russia allied itself to France.


my Anger is now in treaty with... my higher Self....
my Anger is now in league with... my Christ-Consciousness...
my Anger is now bound in legal ceremony to... until death do we part
That's a rap. It's a done deal. It is complete! It is finished.

You mean to tell me, I don't need to "drop" my anger and rage? What a thought. More than new... it is... a revelation! My Blue Sky has just transitioned to the darkness of night, and I can see a BRIGHT LIGHT.... it is from a distant bi-polar star system which looks like one point of light, and that LIGHT is in my face, just like a Torch of Truth burning into my skull.

Wow.

I get it now.
I am free.



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 11:58 PM
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originally posted by: ringdingdong

originally posted by: ZeussusZ
a reply to: ringdingdong

It's not the anger that's the problem. It's what you do with it.


For sure. That's what the article is about.

I've expressed moral outrage numerous times in my life. The only time this has really backfired is when dealing with individuals who have swiss-chess for a conscience while being surrounded by emotionally retarded dimwits. Your best bet is to back away in that situation. Moral outrage will seem as if an act of aggression devoid of reason, and the potential for a feedback loop on your part may give rise to temporary insanity. Break the loop, walk away!


I had to stand up to my boss today.

Yesterday he asked me why I went to the bathroom so much.
Today I told him,"Look man, what my body does in the bathroom
is my private business. What I do with my wife in my our private
bedroom is my private business."

He got all shifty and started to squawk about he didn't care about
my "irritable bowl syndrome" and on and on.... I let him go for
a minute, then I added.

"I'm just letting you know, man."

"I'm just explaining the policy."

"I'm just explaining my policy."

This set him off. The guy a ex-cop with anger issues, who
has a chip on his pansy shoulder. So I had to spell it out
for him using my best guerrilla math.

"My policy is very simple, so simple a child could understand it.
What you do in the your bedroom is your business. What you
do in the bathroom is your business. So handle your business
and let everyone else handle their business."

My Socrates approach fails.

Pantie-waist is blabbing at the mouth again.

"Listen to what I'm saying, if I want to # a midget in the ass
that is my business. Do you get that? I can # who ever I want
and this is my business. Same goes for my bowl movement."


My tone is even, like talking to a child.

"What you say it is your policy it sounds like we have a problem."

huh? What is fool blathering about?

"Well, you tell me, do we have a problem" I say, staring him down.

He looks deeply into my eyes to see if I would back down.

He was getting his hackles up, but like a wolf that is about
to strike at his prey, he paces back and forth. Looking for
the right moment to lung for my neck. But as he paced the
floor he careful and woefully considered the harm that my
massive rack of horns could cause him.

"Do we have a problem?" I asked a second time.

"No, we don't have a problem."

"Good. Let's keep it that way."

I want to say, "And I don't want to have have this conversion
with you again." but then I held my tongue because I new I won
the argument and was best to allow that dog to lay down and
lick his wounds than kick him again.

Discretion is the better part of valor.
Caution is preferable to rash bravery

But it felt good to express my anger honestly and directly
and without hurting myself... while creating a better work
environment for everyone. Now if this guy continues of mess
with me, I will just outshine him and take his job. He had
best just keep away from me.

I feel empowered.
I feel like a man.
I feel good.

It feels like a new kind of Anger.
One that I can control from Higher Self.
One that is full of righteous indignation.

"So, lets get back on the phones and make money."

I say what he needed to say, and leading the way
I walk back to desk and sit down. He follows.

A few moment latter his messing with me again.
Okay, I feel the rage rising up inside me, then
I remind myself I just won the fight, and it was
now time to play nice. So I played the game
and let me tell me what my job. I could give
him that, he needed to save face. But I knew
and he knew, in a grudge match I would take
him to the floor every time.

By the end of the day, we are kewl with each other.
This is how men handle their problems.

What is the take away?

For me, it was most eloquently said by Zack de la Rocha

"Your Anger is your Gift."

If you are not free to express anger, you are not free.
Anyone who tells you otherwise is your enemy.

Seek not liberty from anger, seek only moral anger.
Seek to be righteous in spirit first, then allow the
indignation to poor out of you like a flowing river.



edit on 19-12-2015 by wasaka because: (no reason given)



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