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Closest ever planet which could house intelligent ALIENS discovered

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posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 05:54 PM
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originally posted by: AzothPendragon
a reply to: Frocharocha

Why do we assume life can only exist on an Earth-like planet?

How do we know life does not exist on other planets in our own solar system?

We don't.

It's true; we don't.

Science understands that life can withstand extreme conditions, that's why science believes that life MAYBE DOES exist elsewhere in our solar system, such as in the oceans of Enceladus or Euroa, or maybe microbes in the clouds of Venus of below the surafce of mars.

Science also understands that "life as we know it" may not be the only type of life that can exist. However, we look for life as we know it because that life would be something we can recognize as life when we find it. "Life as we DON'T know it" may be much harder to recognize. We might find it, but now know we found it because it may be so different that we may not recognize it as life.

We know life as we know it needs water, and complex life as we know it needs oxygen (although we know of simple life on Earth that does not require oxygen). Oxygen is a prime element for complex life because it is very reactive, and thus works as a catalyst in many chemical reactions. Complex life probably requires complex metabolic chemical reactions, and oxygen is a prime candidate to be a involved in those reactions.

Having said that, NASA scientists are considering ways to find life as we DON'T know it. In attempting to explain chemical imbalances in the atmosphere of Titan, NASA astrobiologist Chris McKay has considered the potential that life exists on Titan that eats hydrogen and acetylene and uses methane in much the same way Earth life uses water (in the article linked below). The article says that are other non-life explanations for the chemical imbalances on Titan (so calling it evidence of life is jumping the gun), but the point I'm making is that science is in fact considering the possibility of "life as we DON'T know it" on planets that are very non-Earth like:

What is Consuming Hydrogen and Acetylene on Titan?l



edit on 1/1/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 04:26 AM
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In the most fundamental terms, life is any system that is able to decrease its internal entropy at the cost of external resources, which it then discards in a degraded form. To look for life is to look for these imbalances in entropy. en.wikipedia.org...

Life, as we know it, requires only two things - liquid water, and a source of energy. There are microorganisms that "feed" on minerals, or even radiation.



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 06:15 AM
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phys.org...

If this technique wasn't available for most of our exoplanet hunting history expect the vital stats of lots of exoplanets to be shifted. maybe that 1.6 earth G planet will turn out to be a 1.1 earth G planet.



posted on Jan, 2 2016 @ 06:15 AM
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a reply to: Frocharocha

When you say a year there last 18 days what that means?

Is it like interstellar movie? Likif you go there people on earth will get years old in couple of months?



posted on Jan, 3 2016 @ 08:39 AM
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a reply to: saadad

No.

The closer a planet is to the star it is orbiting, the faster that planet moves, plus the path it needs to take around the star is shorter. This planet orbits close to its star, so the planet's orbit is small enough that it takes only 18 Earth days to revolve once around its star. One orbital revolution around a star for a planet = that planet's "year".

Examples of that in our solar system would be Mercury, which orbits closer to the Sun than does Earth. Mercury takes only 88 Earth days to complete one orbit around the Sun. Therefore, one Mercury year is 88 Earth days long. Venus takes 225 Earth days to complete one orbit around the Sun. Therefore, one Venus year is 225 Earth days long.

Planets farther out than earth take longer to orbit the Sun than does Earth. The farthest known planet in our solar system, Neptune, takes 165 Earth years to orbit the Sun once. So one Neptunian year (one orbit around the Sun) = 165 Earth years.


edit on 1/3/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2016 @ 08:45 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Thanks for such a clear information. But what that means for us humans?

If only 18 days is needed for 1 year? Is it we will due faster on that planet or we will live longer since years are switching fast?

I m very confused in thinking about this stuff. Year It's time, so what would happen.



posted on Jan, 3 2016 @ 08:50 AM
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originally posted by: saadad
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Thanks for such a clear information. But what that means for us humans?

If only 18 days is needed for 1 year? Is it we will due faster on that planet or we will live longer since years are switching fast?

I m very confused in thinking about this stuff. Year It's time, so what would happen.


Time is relative. If we live to 70 years old here, the equivalent would be, roughly, 1420 years old with a planet that has an 18 day orbit. We would still live the same amount of time.



posted on Jan, 3 2016 @ 09:00 AM
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originally posted by: saadad
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Thanks for such a clear information. But what that means for us humans?

If only 18 days is needed for 1 year? Is it we will due faster on that planet or we will live longer since years are switching fast?

I m very confused in thinking about this stuff. Year It's time, so what would happen.


If there are 2 guys on a race track and one is going 100 mph and the other is going 25 mph what does that mean? Will the guy going 25 mph live 4 times longer because he is going slower? NO



posted on Jan, 3 2016 @ 10:52 AM
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originally posted by: saadad
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Thanks for such a clear information. But what that means for us humans?

If only 18 days is needed for 1 year? Is it we will due faster on that planet or we will live longer since years are switching fast?

I m very confused in thinking about this stuff. Year It's time, so what would happen.

"days" and "years" are just words -- and those words are usually defined by how long they take to pass on earth.

If you were on the planet mentioned in the OP (Wolf 1061c) with an 18-earth day year (let's cal it one "Wolf 1061c-year"), that Wolf 1061c-year would still feel like it was 18 days long. Someone would need to spend 20.2 "Wolf 1061c-years" before they felt the of one earth year. Of course, 20.2 Wolf 1061c-years is only 365 earth days long. So a person spending 20.2 " Wolf 1061c-years" on Wolf 1061c would not age any more or less than a person spending one Earth year on Earth.


Granted, there is such thing as time dilation, such as what you earlier mentioned happened in the film Interstellar. However, relative speed and or gravity would need to be much much greater before those affects are felt. In that movie, they were very close to the gravity well of a black hole, so that's why they experienced time dilation. That's not happening with the planet Wolf 1061c. Any time dilation that may be occurring due to gravity or relative speed on Wolf 1061c will be so tiny as to be almost immeasurable.

So time dilation like we saw in Interstellar is not really a factor here.


edit on 1/3/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2016 @ 10:55 AM
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a reply to: jheated5

So interstellar movie is just SciFi, no backup in science.

I refers to a scene where they land on a planet where 1h is 7 earth years. So main character is younger than his kids because when he got few hours on that planet his kids got several years on earth.

So on that planet humans can have thousands of years? But do we humans always measure time in earth years?

So in 1 human earth years this planet will have around 20 years.

Really interesting.



posted on Jan, 4 2016 @ 03:28 AM
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originally posted by: saadad
a reply to: jheated5

So interstellar movie is just SciFi, no backup in science.

It does have backup in science, such as that gravitational time dilation.


So on that planet humans can have thousands of years?

On that 18-day-year planet, a person that lives to 90 earth-years old will have lived through 1,825 local years. A year is simply one orbit of a planet around its star.


But do we humans always measure time in earth years?

Yes, when we say "day" or "year" we usually mean earth-days and earth-years. On other planets, days and years last a different length of time.
edit on 4-1-2016 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2016 @ 03:49 AM
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a reply to: saadad

The earth spins that = 1 day and night

The earth moves around the sun that =1 year. (365 days and nights roughly)

The planet in question spins 18 times before it moves around its sun.

Hence 18 days a year

A person living there would not live the same amount of years as they do here on earth, but they would live the same amount of hours and thus have the same "real lifespan"







 
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