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Islam, Christianity and Jesus

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posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 06:39 AM
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When I was younger I used to go to a Church School, Sunday School and was in the Church Choir. One of my subjects studied at school was Religious Education which I had a keen interest in. As I have got older I don't believe to have faith means you have to attend church and I have my own private faith and beliefs, I still have a keen interest in religion also. Due to Islam being discussed all the time I have also become more interested in the similarities and differences to the Christian faith and there are questions I would be grateful if someone could answer.

Do muslims believe in the Old Testament of the Bible? Do they believe in Moses and the Ten Commandments?

I know when speaking to friends that muslims believe in Jesus and his teachings but whereas Christians believe he was the Son of God, muslims believe he was a Prophet. Is that correct? As Jesus said he would return in End Times do muslims not believe this? Its just if I am correct Mohammed was a prophet who came after Jesus and said he would be the last Prophet. Am I correct in this assertion? So then do muslims disregard some of Jesus teachings ie him saying he would return.

Do muslims believe in the book of Revelations? Do they see end times as discussed there or do they have different teachings?

When I asked a friend about what Hadith is they said this was a set of instructions created so men and animals knew how to act and comply with teachings in the Quran. Is that correct? Do all muslims follow the Hadith or do some just follow the Quran?

If anyone has the time to explain I would be grateful as I find the subject interesting.




posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 06:49 AM
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Yes they believe in the 10 commandments, Though theyre not listed as 10 commandments in the Qur'an, but each commandment is mentioned throughout the Qur'an and there is a reverence to the law written in tablets. Also note,,,Moses is also one of Islam's revered holy prophets, along with Adam, Abraham, Noah, and Jesus.




posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 06:54 AM
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THey do believe that Jesus will return, but they call him Isa. They say he will return, immediately acknowledge Mohammed/Islam as being correct and then turn on his followers.



posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 07:30 AM
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Is that true about Jesus? If that is the case then he is seen more as a false prophet isnt he surely?a reply to: ketsuko



posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 07:32 AM
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So then before Mohammed did muslims believe Jesus was the son of God? Is Islam then only formed when Mohammed appears?a reply to: ReadLeader



posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 08:25 AM
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a reply to: anxiouswens

Yes, the end times for Muslims is the opposite perspective of Christianity. Similar story from the opposite perspective.

Information:



posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: anxiouswens

There are many varying interpretations and beliefs within the Islamic faith. Your questions may generate dozens of differing answers. I will answer according to "mainstream" Sunni opinion.


• "Do muslims believe in the Old Testament of the Bible? Do they believe in Moses and the Ten Commandments?"

Muslims do believe in the legitimacy of the Bible, specifically mentioned are the Torah, Psalms, and Gospels, however, Muslims believe that the purity of the Bible has been adulterated and can not be trusted as completely accurate or authentic.

Muslims believe in Moses and all prophets mentioned in the Old Testament. The Qur'an also states that Allah sent (unnamed) prophets/messengers throughout the world to all peoples.

 


• "I know when speaking to friends that muslims believe in Jesus and his teachings but whereas Christians believe he was the Son of God, muslims believe he was a Prophet. Is that correct? As Jesus said he would return in End Times do muslims not believe this? Its just if I am correct Mohammed was a prophet who came after Jesus and said he would be the last Prophet. Am I correct in this assertion? So then do muslims disregard some of Jesus teachings ie him saying he would return."

Muslims believe that Jesus was born from a virgin, but is not God, the Son of God, God in the flesh, nor an aspect of a Trinity. They believe Jesus was the Messiah, a prophet, and miracle worker.

Islam does make mention of Jesus' return during the End Times. Islam accepts Jesus and calls Muhammad their last prophet, but as Jesus is "returning", he is not considered a "new" prophet.

 


• "Do muslims believe in the book of Revelations? Do they see end times as discussed there or do they have different teachings?"

Islamic eschatology is very similar to the Biblical narrative of Gog & Magog and the Battle of Armageddon. They believe Jesus will descend from the heavens at the climax of an epic war to defeat the Dajjal (Antichrist). It is taught that Jesus is a Muslim, will rebuke the errors of religion, and will establish an era of peace through the implementation of a religious one world government.

 


• "When I asked a friend about what Hadith is they said this was a set of instructions created so men and animals knew how to act and comply with teachings in the Quran. Is that correct? Do all muslims follow the Hadith or do some just follow the Quran?

The Hadith are accounts of the actions, sayings, and teachings of Muhammad. The Qur'an is the "word of Allah," while the Hadith are the "word of Muhammad". The Hadith range from historic narrative, law, military rules of conduct, hygiene, etiquette, culture, ethics, morals, prophecies, and explanations of the Qur'an and Islam.

Not all Muslims adhere to the Hadith, and not all Hadith are universally accepted. Hadith adherence depends on denomination, sect, school of thought, and individual interpretation.



edit on 12/17/15 by Sahabi because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 08:44 AM
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a reply to: anxiouswens

Were there "Muslims" before Mohammad?



posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: SergeantSmoke


Yes, there were Arab Allah gods before Muhammad.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Allah is a generic title for whatever god was considered the highest god. Different Arab tribes used “Allah” to refer to its personal high god.

“Allah” was being worshipped at the Kaa’ba in Mecca by Arabs prior to the time of Mohammed. It was formerly the name of the chief god among the numerous idols (360) in the Kaaba in Mecca before Mohammed made them into monotheists.

Historians have shown that the moon god called “Hubal” (Baal of the Moabites) was the god to whom Arabs prayed at the Kaa’ba and they used the name “Allah” when they prayed.


edit on 17-12-2015 by infolurker because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 09:06 AM
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originally posted by: anxiouswens
So then before Mohammed did muslims believe Jesus was the son of God? Is Islam then only formed when Mohammed appears?a reply to: ReadLeader



Before Islam, many Jewish and Christians sects taught different things about Jesus. Some said he was a fully human prophet,... some say the Messiah,... some say the Son of God,... some say God in the flesh,... some say Trinity,... etc.

Islam teaches that all throughout history, there has only been one God, and that submission to the one God is the true religion. The word "Islam", although very rich in meaning, is taken as, "submission to God", while a "Muslim" is one who adheres to "Islam". Islam considers the prophets of the Bible to be submitters to God, thusly, categorizing them all as Muslims.



posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 09:23 AM
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originally posted by: anxiouswens
When I was younger I used to go to a Church School, Sunday School and was in the Church Choir. One of my subjects studied at school was Religious Education which I had a keen interest in. As I have got older I don't believe to have faith means you have to attend church and I have my own private faith and beliefs, I still have a keen interest in religion also. Due to Islam being discussed all the time I have also become more interested in the similarities and differences to the Christian faith and there are questions I would be grateful if someone could answer.

Do muslims believe in the Old Testament of the Bible? Do they believe in Moses and the Ten Commandments?

I know when speaking to friends that muslims believe in Jesus and his teachings but whereas Christians believe he was the Son of God, muslims believe he was a Prophet. Is that correct? As Jesus said he would return in End Times do muslims not believe this? Its just if I am correct Mohammed was a prophet who came after Jesus and said he would be the last Prophet. Am I correct in this assertion? So then do muslims disregard some of Jesus teachings ie him saying he would return.

Do muslims believe in the book of Revelations? Do they see end times as discussed there or do they have different teachings?

When I asked a friend about what Hadith is they said this was a set of instructions created so men and animals knew how to act and comply with teachings in the Quran. Is that correct? Do all muslims follow the Hadith or do some just follow the Quran?

If anyone has the time to explain I would be grateful as I find the subject interesting.


it depends on which faction of muslims ur speaking about. the short and correct answer that should be is. by the Quran.. a muslim, will believe and not dispute about whether Isa was born to mary through the will of God. there is no logical gymnastics involved. mary was not fertilized with a man's sperm but with the will of God, thus the only person who could be Jesus father.. IS God. which was to say as God does.. He was no Orphan. and the house of joseph and all remained in tact reinforcing the idea, that he was no orphan.

the truth is, the only thing that drives a wedge between christianity and islam are the words of muhammad. a muhammad who's words were added to the Quran at a time when he didnt understand fully Christian doctrine and methods of teaching. his instructions were based on misinterpretation whilst warning about misinterpreation to practicing paganism. his fear was that his people would not become victim like the jews by forgetting the true God and how to serve him. he made a big calamity to ensure that it was remembered. The Arabs they were once used as God's redeemers. invading nations that turned against God or away from God. he would hate for his people to falter and become victims of the same fate.

muslims must recognize that there was a Quran that came before muhammad. the Quran of their ancestors. the true Quran which was transmitted orally before muhammad was even born.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 10:02 AM
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a reply to: anxiouswens

The easiest thing to do would be to read the Qur'an for yourself. I suggest the Pickthall translation that's in my Sig. Otherwise, anyone can come in here & tell you anything. It's always better to check for yourself.

Also, there are numerous different denominations & schools of thought in Islam. So you'll definitely get different answers to each of your questions; especially when Hadith & Sunna are concerned.

But for a quick breakdown anyway:


When I asked a friend about what Hadith is they said this was a set of instructions created so men and animals knew how to act and comply with teachings in the Quran. Is that correct? Do all muslims follow the Hadith or do some just follow the Quran?

There are some Hadith & Sunna which are widely accepted as accurate & there are many that are only accepted by specific denominations. And different denominations place different importance on different Hadith & Sunna. Some believe the Qur'an is incomplete (but they'll rely say it for fear of being blasphemousra); so they believe the Hadith & Sunna fill in the "blanks" in the Qur'an. While others believe the Qur'an is complete, so everything else is just a suggestion or innovation (like Quranists). But most denominations are somewhere in between these.



Do muslims believe in the book of Revelations? Do they see end times as discussed there or do they have different teachings?

Depends. We believe in the End of the World and Judgment Day, but the way it's described in the Qur'an is different from traditional Christian lore (much of which came from the "Sefir Zerubbabel"). Basically, God will decide when it's time; an Angel will blow the horn; reality will tear apart; all things "living" in this existence will die; all things that have lived in our existence will revive in the true dimension; then our souls will be judged (Judgment Day); and the souls that "passed" will go to Jannah/Heaven while the souls that "failed" will go to Jahannam/Hell.

Of course, different denominations have different accounts. Some believe the Prophet Jesus will return to fight blah blah, but that's not what the Qur'an says. Others believe Gog & Magog will be around at that time & they will play a part in some final battle. But the Qur'an doesn't even say what Gog & Magog are; which leaves each sect to speculate. The Qur'an doesn't even mention the Dajjal or the great Madhi/12 Imam either. But whatever.



I know when speaking to friends that muslims believe in Jesus and his teachings but whereas Christians believe he was the Son of God, muslims believe he was a Prophet. Is that correct? As Jesus said he would return in End Times do muslims not believe this? Its just if I am correct Mohammed was a prophet who came after Jesus and said he would be the last Prophet. Am I correct in this assertion? So then do muslims disregard some of Jesus teachings ie him saying he would return.

Yes, we believe the Prophet Jesus is a Prophet and a human. He's one of our 4 most highly revered Prophets, along with the Prophets Moses/Musa, Dawood/David, and Muhammad. He & the Prophet Adam are my 2 personal favorites for personal reasons. Anyway, the Qur'an does have a passage that says the prophet Jesus will be revived, but the context implies it's during the Day of Judgment. The Prophet Muhammad is the final messenger, but the Qur'an says the Prophets all taught the same message. So yeah... Of course, different denominations add different things to it, so that's why it's best if you read the Qur'an for yourself first.



Do muslims believe in the Old Testament of the Bible? Do they believe in Moses and the Ten Commandments?

The prophet Moses/Musa is the Prophet who's mentioned the most in the Qur'an. In fact, the very 2nd Surah in the Qur'an is named after the calf that the Israelites were tempted with when the Prophet Moses went to receive the Tablets. However, we believe the scriptures were altered, so many things in the Qur'an correct the alterations to the stories or teachings. Oh & just for the record, the "10 Commandments" are actually just a summary of the "Covenant Code", which also may not be what was completely on those specific tablets. But someone else can explain how the different sources were compiled for the Old Testament.

Hope this helps. You'll definitely get other interpretations, but that's not a bad thing. It'll probably help you see why there are differences in Islamic sects & denominations. It's kind of like asking Christians for their beliefs on specific subjects. Each denomination may officially teach different things, so it's hard to have 1 specific, "standard" reply.



posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 11:43 AM
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Allah is a generic title for whatever god was considered the highest god. Different Arab tribes used “Allah” to refer to its personal high god.

“Allah” was being worshipped at the Kaa’ba in Mecca by Arabs prior to the time of Mohammed. It was formerly the name of the chief god among the numerous idols (360) in the Kaaba in Mecca before Mohammed made them into monotheists.

Historians have shown that the moon god called “Hubal” (Baal of the Moabites) was the god to whom Arabs prayed at the Kaa’ba and they used the name “Allah” when they prayed.


El is a generic title for whatever god was considered the highest god. Different Semitic tribes used “El” to refer to its personal high god.

“El” was being worshipped in the Promised Land by Semites prior to the time of Moses. It was formerly the name of the chief god among the numerous gods of the Canaanite religion before Hezekiah made them into Yahwist monotheists.

Historians have shown that the storm, war, and fertility god called Baal Hadad was the god to whom Semites prayed to in the Levant and they used the name “Baal” when they prayed to Yahweh.






edit on 12/17/15 by Sahabi because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2015 @ 04:02 AM
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a reply to: anxiouswens

originally posted by: anxiouswens
So then before Mohammed did muslims believe Jesus was the son of God? Is Islam then only formed when Mohammed appears?

a reply to: SergeantSmoke

originally posted by: SergeantSmoke
a reply to: anxiouswens
Were there "Muslims" before Mohammad?


According to Islamic teachings, every people on earth were sent a messenger of the One True God, although some may have distorted their teachings over time. Muhammad just happened to be the last one, supposed to be the final message that would be applicable to all humanity (instead of individual tribes and people), thus "completing" Islam. So yes, it isn't considered a new faith. The Quran does refer to lots of pre-Muhammad people as "muslims" (including Jesus, Abraham, and the prophets and their immediate followers).

The thing is, that during the time of Muhammad (and in many places in the Quran), the words "Islam" and "Muslim" weren't used exclusively as identifiers of the followers of Muhammad. Anyone who believed in God would be a muslim, and that act of their faith would be "Islam".
edit on 18-12-2015 by babloyi because: (no reason given)



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