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Saturn's Moons Align To Form Bullseye In Orbit

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posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 05:18 PM
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NASA has released an image of Tethys and Enceladus that captures the moment the two Moons aligned to form a Bullseye in space , the image was captured on Sept 24th using the spacecraft’s narrow-angle camera.




posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 05:20 PM
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a reply to: gortex

really cool, thanks!
They look sort of like a button mushroom to me though, maybe I am just hungry...



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 05:56 PM
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a reply to: gortex

And so the ballet cosmic continues.

These interesting conjunctions serve little purpose in my eyes, save to remind us that the patch of universe in which we live, is a delicately balanced clockwork, and worth feasting ones eyes upon as often as possible, for the simple reason that to look upon its majesty is to be struck dumb by it, and that sensations of that sort are worth pursuing for their own sake.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 08:19 PM
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What a lesson this life.



posted on Dec, 17 2015 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: gortex

I'm sure that you have seen this but...there are red streaks on Tethys



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The red streaks were faintly visible in early images from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, which swooped into the Saturn system in 2004. But it wasn’t until April that Cassini got a close look at the extraterrestrial artwork. Now, after a close flyby in November, scientists can peer even more closely at the smudges. And what they’re finding doesn’t make a lot of sense.


A mystery!


One thing is clear, though: The streaks are relatively young. Normally, dust from Saturn’s E ring and charged particles from space would erase the smudges. But they’re still there. And, they’re drawn on top of the Odysseus basin, meaning that the crater came first


There may be a clue!


When Schenk mapped the lines onto the moon’s surface, he saw a pattern suggesting the moon is being squeezed or deformed by some kind of global stress – such as irregular rotation, a shifting orbit, or the migration of its poles.


Or not, when simulations were performed, it didn't match up...

Anyway, very interesting and thanks for giving me something to look into!



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