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Yale students sign petition to repeal first amendment

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posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:23 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy

originally posted by: ketsuko

originally posted by: introvert

originally posted by: peskyhumans
a reply to: LesMisanthrope

No doubt, but he got 59 students to sign it.

Think about that. 59 of our best and brightest attending one of our countries finest universities, who will no doubt someday be leaders of our country, signed a document to repeal part of our Constitution.

That should deeply worry everybody.


59 out of over 12,000.

Context is key.


So all 12,000 students were asked to sign?


If 60 were asked to sign and only 59 did, then it is quite telling.

But some will say that there are 7 billion people on the planet, so 59 out of 7 billion isn't bad at all.


No one knows how many he asked or how many even stopped. Even given the time frame, there is no number for comparison. There is NO way to compute this or call anything 'telling'.

No idea how many people pass there at that time of day. No idea if some thought it was a joke. no idea if any saw the camera.
edit on 16-12-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: introvert

originally posted by: DBCowboy

originally posted by: introvert
a reply to: DBCowboy

It's funny you call them snowflakes when it is you and others that are "melting" over the thought 59 kids signed a piece of paper that doesn't mean squat.

Irony?


I was being nice. I should call these college kids morons. If they think that government can remove rights.


So they are morons and you guys are snowflakes.

Got it.


I'm a very special entitled snowflake. Now give me a trophy.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:25 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy

originally posted by: introvert

originally posted by: DBCowboy

originally posted by: introvert
a reply to: DBCowboy

It's funny you call them snowflakes when it is you and others that are "melting" over the thought 59 kids signed a piece of paper that doesn't mean squat.

Irony?


I was being nice. I should call these college kids morons. If they think that government can remove rights.


So they are morons and you guys are snowflakes.

Got it.


I'm a very special entitled snowflake. Now give me a trophy.


here's your trophy.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:25 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Only if I get one too. We both participated.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:26 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: DBCowboy

Only if I get one too. We both participated.



That's what counts!

If we don't each get one, lets start a petition!



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:27 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko

originally posted by: introvert

originally posted by: peskyhumans
a reply to: introvert

59 is still 59. For Yale students this number should be 0.


How many said no? Do you know that number?

But let's assume these 59 truly believe in the petition. Do you want to change the way they think? Why should Yale students conform to your politically correct way of thought or speaking?


I thought you believed that everyone had rights like freedom of speech. These students just signed a petition to revoke the 1st Amendment which explicitly protects that right.

Do you or do you not believe we all have the right to free speech and should it or should it not be protected?


It should be protected, and that includes the right for these kids to sign any petition they want.

But knowing how you work, I'd be willing to bet that you're going to come back with something along the lines of "well if you believe in freedom of speech, you should denounce what the kids did".

I do. I do not like the fact that these kids may have signed a petition to stop free speech. But I don't know the entire context of the video. But if it's true, it's only 59 kids practicing free speech. Even if I don't agree with them, they have the right to believe whatever they want.

To take any other stance is against free speech.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:27 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: DBCowboy

Only if I get one too. We both participated.



Here ya go


Wouldn't want you to feel left out.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:28 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy

originally posted by: introvert

originally posted by: DBCowboy

originally posted by: introvert
a reply to: DBCowboy

It's funny you call them snowflakes when it is you and others that are "melting" over the thought 59 kids signed a piece of paper that doesn't mean squat.

Irony?


I was being nice. I should call these college kids morons. If they think that government can remove rights.


So they are morons and you guys are snowflakes.

Got it.


I'm a very special entitled snowflake. Now give me a trophy.


Sorry. Trophies are for people who do things that matter.

Knee-jerking about college idiots does not matter. It just makes you a snowflake.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:29 PM
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a reply to: introvert

You can have a trophy too.




posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:30 PM
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a reply to: introvert

Is it freedom of expression to promote something that would deny freedom of expression?



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:33 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko

originally posted by: reldra

originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: reldra

Define offensive.

Give me some examples of what would be offensive to you please.


You could include what I posted that you are referring to.


You were talking about people choosing to be offensive and liking to be offensive.

So I want to know what you think is offensive and to provide examples.

Do I need to provide a definition of offensive for you?


Being bigoted, prejudiced, promoting stereotypes. That kind of thing.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:34 PM
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You have to admit, an adult signing a petition to repeal the first amendment is an absurdity. The fact that it happens at an Ivy league school makes it that much worse.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:35 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: introvert

Is it freedom of expression to promote something that would deny freedom of expression?


Yes, the promotion and talking about it is.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:37 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
You have to admit, an adult signing a petition to repeal the first amendment is an absurdity. The fact that it happens at an Ivy league school makes it that much worse.


Watching the entire video, though, the guy with the petition kind of rambles on. He talks about changing parts of the constitution often and that it is a living document and that it should be a 'safe place'- God only knows what busy students on the way to class make of that.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:37 PM
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a reply to: introvert

Here's the problem:

It's one thing to say, "I don't think we should have free speech." It's another thing to sign a petition which is usually linked to calls for some kind of political action. Petitions are how politician recalls are begun among other things. Petitions force ballot initiatives. So, it's easy to say that something is "just" a petition, but I can give you one example of what a petition can do.

We have a local man who constantly advocates for light rail. He has started I forget how many ballot initiatives through petition. None of them passed ... until ... one did. It was a total disaster for the city who thought much as you and reldra seem to, "Oh, it's just a petition. He's done this how many times now? It means nothing ..." Here's the kicker - *I* even thought that and *I* voted for it never thinking it would pass that time.

But it did.

So, are they speaking when they sign the petition, or are they potentially setting in motion a chain of events that could have far reaching implications? Possibly rights oppressing implications.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:37 PM
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originally posted by: reldra

originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: introvert

Is it freedom of expression to promote something that would deny freedom of expression?


Yes, the promotion and talking about it is.


Then I also have the freedom to deny them the right to inhibit their rights to deny rights to others!



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:39 PM
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a reply to: reldra

I also asked for example. See, what one person considers to fit under those umbrellas may differ from what another considers to fit under those umbrellas.

If I am to avoid offending you and you specifically, I have to know what your personal thresholds are.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:41 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy

originally posted by: reldra

originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: introvert

Is it freedom of expression to promote something that would deny freedom of expression?


Yes, the promotion and talking about it is.


Then I also have the freedom to deny them the right to inhibit their rights to deny rights to others!


That sentence is convoluted. No one can deny anyone's free speech rights, in general, though we know there are exceptions. In general, you can say what you want. Just don't blame anyone else if you look like you weren't raised right or someone kills themselves.



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

And you think that a petition will stand-up in court over the constitution?



posted on Dec, 16 2015 @ 04:42 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: introvert

Is it freedom of expression to promote something that would deny freedom of expression?


Sadly, yes.

Funny how freedom works sometimes.



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