It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Construction advice for sustainable living.

page: 2
5
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:30 AM
link   

originally posted by: Wetpaint72
a reply to: network dude
Pellet stoves are pretty good option to fireplaces and woodstoves. But you would need electricity for the blower and the hopper. You can get one that's takes multi fuel, and if youre ambitious, make your own pellets with a pellet machine.

Could that not be handled with solar/wind power?




posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:35 AM
link   

originally posted by: Wetpaint72
a reply to: network dude
I went with a company called am-cor.com... Check out their process. The web site is very informative I suggest you dig around there, especially in the insulation portion. Even if you don't use them, seeing their process and materials could be very helpful.


Thanks! I like the construction ideas there. Very close to what I had in mind.



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:35 AM
link   

originally posted by: nonspecific

originally posted by: Wetpaint72
a reply to: network dude
Pellet stoves are pretty good option to fireplaces and woodstoves. But you would need electricity for the blower and the hopper. You can get one that's takes multi fuel, and if youre ambitious, make your own pellets with a pellet machine.

Could that not be handled with solar/wind power?

Absolutely! And what are you doing for water, if I might ask?
Sorr replied to your post, but questioned about water to wrong person.
edit on 14-12-2015 by Wetpaint72 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:38 AM
link   
a reply to: nonspecific

I was planning on an LP tank for cooking and hot water. We wanted solar power for minimal lighting and everyday electrical needs. (DC fridge possibly?) Looking for the most efficient use, so we could get by with as little as possible.

This is turning out to offer some fantastic ideas. Thanks to all!!!



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:39 AM
link   
a reply to: Wetpaint72

A well is the norm here. We have lots of good fresh water from 30-70 feet down, and almost everywhere.



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:41 AM
link   

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: Wetpaint72

A well is the norm here. We have lots of good fresh water from 30-70 feet down, and almost everywhere.

Electric or hand pump?



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:41 AM
link   
a reply to: network dude
Have you heard of The Giant, aka The Giant Earth Ship? It was built by Vic Cook of Pendleton, In. and is an off the grid house.
The Giant video
More on this type of construction:
Earthsip Biostructure
I tried to find Vic Cook's actual website but it's been taken down, apparently.
He somehow turned a log into a refrigerator/freezer using a copper coil with ammonia running through it. Sewage was composted. Sounds gross and not sure I would do it.



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:42 AM
link   
a reply to: nonspecific

Not much wind here, I do like the wind power idea, but for this location, it's not an option. Solar would be good and the idea is to build it while the subsidies exist and could pay for the infrastructure based on selling back solar power. It's not really efficient when given the big picture, but if the system was paid for, then upkeep and maintenance would be the only cost to operate long term. Plus who knows what technology is on the horizon.



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:44 AM
link   
a reply to: Wetpaint72

Electric with the SHTF manual option if needed. ( I was thinking of installing several stair steppers, link them up to the pump and offer weight loss classes a few times a day when water was most needed.)

I just need to be sure I have portly neighbors who I can convince need to loose some weight.



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:49 AM
link   
a reply to: Skid Mark

I'm good with a septic tank. We can compost trash and hopefully come up with a good recycle system, but poop doesn't need to be a part of the picture. (yuk)



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:51 AM
link   

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: nonspecific

Not much wind here, I do like the wind power idea, but for this location, it's not an option. Solar would be good and the idea is to build it while the subsidies exist and could pay for the infrastructure based on selling back solar power. It's not really efficient when given the big picture, but if the system was paid for, then upkeep and maintenance would be the only cost to operate long term. Plus who knows what technology is on the horizon.


Man...there is so much research that went into my place. Building it was the easy part. You would think there would be a place to go to at least get an overview, but even those that I thought did...once we got into it they weren't as helpful as I thought. And then there's the building permits and the city and inspections. I've been through this, and I would be happy to help you in any way I can. Feel free to message me, I will do what I can. I'm in rural Ga. And there were more hoops than I had intecipated.

My first mistake was mis interpreting the code for minimum square footage. So my choice was to fight it, or add...I didn't have the time or money to fight, so I added. Start there...then you can begin your drawings.

My original design was 800 sqft. I had to redesign to add a 200 sqft studio to meet code.



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:53 AM
link   
a reply to: network dude
I don't blame you. The very idea of using my own poo to grow food turns my stomach. You probably already know this but make sure septic is downhill from your house and well.



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:56 AM
link   


The plan is a cinder block building, cement floor, cement roof. Three sides with the 4th side being all glass. (sliding doors with screens.)
Pile dirt over the structure and plant shallow root shrubs and other similar type plants on top. (to hold the dirt together)

There would be a few skylights that extend up past the dirt, along with a few vents, for plumbing and air circulation.

The overall idea is that the dirt would insulate the building, helping keep it cool in summer hot weather. We talked about a small solar farm for the power, and a simple well and septic. So the entire things would be off grid and sustainable. (as long as the solar equipment lasted)


Good ideas. Definite yes on septic and a well. Be sure to make as much gravity fed as possible, to cut down on pump needs. In addition to a well, I would recommend including a manual pump option for the well (for emergencies), as well as rain catchment, and other water storage. (If near a lake, an option to get water from the lake isn't half bad either!).

Power wise, solar is good, but I would recommend it only as a secondary. Better may be to go with underground propane tanks and generator. Rationed, it could last you quite a while and provide more wattage. And of course, propane doesn't go "bad" so that's why it over gas or diesel.


The structure itself would be simple, 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom, laundry room, with an open floor plan including kitchen, dining, and living areas open to the large glass wall.


I would recommend including a root cellar into the design (old fashioned fridge use), as well as a large area for storage for food, weapons, etc., and building a nearby game house (place where you could butcher hunted game). Don't forget the bathroom needs! The large glass wall though, kind of a security risk. At least make it high-rated storm glass, and may want to have some kind of shuttering or other protective cover than can be put in place (maybe some sliding walls that can be used when needed?)


The ceiling would be metal truss, with corrugated steel, then cement poured over the top so the entire box was concrete, less the glass wall. A Fireplace would offer heat when needed, and with vents and open wall at front, some fans would offer air movement and hopefully cooler air.


If anyone handy in construction/design notices any obvious flaws with this, please say so. Thanks for looking.


ETA: this is the general idea, but the land is really, really flat here, so it would just be a mound in the woods.


Some other things to consider for off the grid....

Communication, you may want to be off the grid, but a HAM radio would probably be a good idea (if SHTF prep), and a satellite dish for entertainment, news, etc. (pre-SHTF).

Sustainable food - You may want to put gardening into your plans, such as a greenhouse area, or outdoor garden. Of course, you could always fish, hunt as well, but nice to have options and variety. Check into "growing a hidden survival garden" and you'll see lots of ideas for how to do it without making it LOOK like a garden.



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 09:57 AM
link   
a reply to: Wetpaint72

Thanks for that advice. I'm in the planning/pipe dream phase right now. We are just talking about how much land and how much it's going to cost, (and if we can even get it) at this time. Luckily, I do have some friends that work with city/county government, so hopefully, I can get some good advice on all that right from the source and plan accordingly. (My friend whom this project is with, his wife works with country office and knows everyone) So I hope proper planning will help smooth this out, should it ever come to fruition.



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 10:01 AM
link   
a reply to: network dude

As regards to your septic tank you should look at the option of installing a methane digester as it will anaoerobically break down waste whilst also giving you a methane supply for either fuel or possibly to run gas powered refridgeration.

Also look into aquaponics as it is a great way to grow vegatables and raise fish without exessive wastage of water.

As to the well are you thinking of a traditonal well or a bore hole? If you go for a bore hole this can also be a great way of utilising the ambient underground temperature for hot water heating?



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 10:02 AM
link   
Sounds like a wonderful plan and I am more than a little jealous!

I second the wood (or masonry) stove- anytime you can get double duty from an appliance that's nothing but good.
Def triple check those codes and reg's- a mistake there is very costly in time and money. The only thing that concerns me about your original plan is the strength needed for the roof to hold metal, concrete, and wet earth and plants. Unless you can arch the roof of concrete maybe? It's probably done all the time but it sounds so heavy, I'd be thinking 'cave in' every time a big rain came along-haha! Love the living roof concept too, I always wanted to try that. Good luck! Please share pics when you get it going!



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 10:04 AM
link   

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: Wetpaint72

Thanks for that advice. I'm in the planning/pipe dream phase right now. We are just talking about how much land and how much it's going to cost, (and if we can even get it) at this time. Luckily, I do have some friends that work with city/county government, so hopefully, I can get some good advice on all that right from the source and plan accordingly. (My friend whom this project is with, his wife works with country office and knows everyone) So I hope proper planning will help smooth this out, should it ever come to fruition.


It all starts with a dream! Just keep putting one foot in front of the other! Its great to hear you will have support in the city/county area! Gosh there were times I was frustrated, held up by weather, went over on budget on some things and freaked out....only to have other things come in under budget and balance out. I paid cash too, so it took longer, and was a lesson in patience and perseverance. I would see all kinds of building go up in what seemed like a couple of month, as I slugged along at a snails pace.

But now it's mine, I have no mortgage, I'm happy!!!

Never give up on your dreams!



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 10:05 AM
link   

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: Skid Mark

I'm good with a septic tank. We can compost trash and hopefully come up with a good recycle system, but poop doesn't need to be a part of the picture. (yuk)


Squeamish eh?

I mentioned in another post using a methane digester. Basically a septic tank that you preload with cattle poo, the bacteria in the poo creates an anerobic digestion proccess that gives of methane and your own waste adds to the supply, the methane then goes into a seperate tank and can be used as a fuel source.

The matter that remains is pretty much compost and can be disgarded if your that squeamish



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 10:09 AM
link   
a reply to: Wetpaint72

This will be a cash only, as needed, as payed for type project as well. So it's not going to be fast either. Plus I need to get the wife 100% on board which as of right now, she pats me on the head and says "good for you", like I might to with a crazy person. So there is that.



posted on Dec, 14 2015 @ 10:12 AM
link   
a reply to: nonspecific

I'm fine with a septic tank. It's pretty much the norm around here. If city water is an option, I'd jump on it, but have a well for backup. I used to instrumentation work and that was mostly waste and water treatment plants, so I am familiar with the digester idea. I just don't plan to fill it up all that fast, so it should be good till I become one with the dirt.







 
5
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join