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Looking for advice on a starter telescope for a 9 year old please.

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posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 06:11 AM
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I am thinking about getting my 9 year old son a little telescope for christmas, nothing special just a suprise as he has (largely due to ATS) become pretty interested in space and also science.

Knowing how fickle kids can be I don't want to spend a lot on one unless he shows more than a passing interest.

I saw this set link and thought it looked a little too cheap to be of any real use?

Basically its a telescope and tripod,

Type: refractor telescope

Lens diameter: 50 mm

Focal length: 360 mm

Maximum magnification: 100x

And a microscope, he is also showing an interest in science.

Type: biological microscope

Minimum magnification: 300x

Maximum magnification: 1200x

Lighting: from below

Suited for transparent preparations.

Given that he is only 9 would these be cool enough to give him an opening into the world of far away and very small.

Also bieng 9 he is a wizz kid, I have seen that you can get usb camera's that can attatch to both telescopes and microscopes, I thought this might make it even cooler?

As regards the telescope we live in a large town so would need to head into the wilderness I imagine to have any chance of viewing anything esle than the moon and the neighbours


Any info and advice would be appriciated as I try my best to help my son want to learn about the world we live in and keep him away from minecraft!




posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 07:27 AM
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Stay away from that one....it's junk.
Stick to a well known telescope maker. Orion, celestron, etc etc.

Read this.
www.skyandtelescope.com...

From personal experience I would recommend a small refractor because of simplicity and reliability.
Maybe even a spotting scope from a sporting goods store.
You can use them in the daytime to gain experience.

You are also much better off buying a small high quality telescope than a large cheap one.
This is one place you get what you pay for.



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 07:32 AM
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It's nice that he's showing an interest, but like you said, kids are fickle. They'll want a guitar, then it sits in the corner gathering dust, because they didn't become an instant Eddy Van Halen. Unless/until he shows a continued interest, I'd say something like this would do him fine.
And if he stops using it, Dad can just happen to enjoy it.

www.hayneedle.com... pe=pla_with_promotion&kw=&ci_17588969&ci_sku=CELE706-1&gclid=COSz-r342MkCFQGTaQodTZEOqA



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 07:40 AM
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Something like this maybe.

www.skyandtelescope.com...


The basketball shoes I bought my kid last night cost more that this scope,,,,,,,ugg
edit on 13-12-2015 by Bluntone22 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 07:45 AM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
Stay away from that one....it's junk.
Stick to a well known telescope maker. Orion, celestron, etc etc.

Read this.
www.skyandtelescope.com...

From personal experience I would recommend a small refractor because of simplicity and reliability.
Maybe even a spotting scope from a sporting goods store.
You can use them in the daytime to gain experience.

You are also much better off buying a small high quality telescope than a large cheap one.
This is one place you get what you pay for.


Thanks for the advice, I know you get what you pay for but is it the quality or the specs on the cheap one that will cause problems? I am on a tight budget this year and he has shown an interest in a telescope, microscope and metal detector. For a kid his age in the times we live in I am chuffed that he is showing interest outside xbox's and junk.

The idea was to get him all three and hope one sticks, then we can upgrade in the future.

All I want is for him to be able to see the moon and it's craters, Mars and maybe the rings around saaturn, that kind of thing and see how much he gets interested, it's the same with the microscope, just something to look at insect wings and suchlike.



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 07:51 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific

Mostly quality,
Getting the most bang for your buck doesn't mean the biggest or highest magnification. In this case it means highest quality.
Read the links I posted for more detailed info. It will not take long and you will learn all the basics.



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 08:03 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

I'm struggling to get my head around the science in this lol.

So this one is in a shop down the road and is about 3 times the price of the cheap and nasty one. link

In laymans terms apart from looking bigger and more impressive what would be the benifit in terms of what we could see and the detail? would it make a big difference as a beginner who is 9 and never even looked through a pair of binoculars?



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 09:29 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific


When I deal with 9 year olds I use the k.i.s.s. method.
Keep it simple stupid...lol
The one in your link is likely fine for stars and the moon but does not work well in daylight.
That's why I recommend a refractor for a beginner.
They can use it any time and it's easy to use.
The more success he has early the more likely he will stick with it.



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 10:21 AM
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I think the OPs original idea is fine.
You just don't know if the kid will take to it.
Yes the optics are cheap. But much better than none.
If the kids stays with it then next year get him something decent.

Consider 10x binoculars. They can be used beyond astronomy.



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific

You could try the Bresser Skylux models, refractor type, German made but not expensive. Some are around €160-€200, and spot on for a youngster moongazing. I have one for ages now, so likely well updated





Some other advice in this thread.

www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 13-12-2015 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 11:41 AM
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I think if you went to any astronomy forum and asked the same question they'd tell you to get some decent quality binoculars such as 10*50's or 20*80's ( depending on budget).

You can get a good gander at the moon and go right out to DSO's like nebulae plus he can use them when out on walks/exploring so there is less chance of them gathering dust.

Telescopes provide too smaller range of view through one eye for kids IMO but they universally love binocs as you get a nice stereoscopic wide field view.



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 11:45 AM
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Find an astronomy club near you and try out the different set ups, find out what works best for you and your daughter.

Personally, I always recommend a small dobsonian for a first time telescope. Something in the 6-8 inch range. Easy to use and set up, and not terribly expensive. Also, invest in good eyepieces and learn to use them; those are what make or break your experience.

And having a good start chart or book really helps. These are a bit dated, but what I always head out with. And don't forget a red flashlight!




posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 12:13 PM
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Anyone got any views on using a mega zoom bridge camera instead of a telescope, upwards of 60 x optical zoom for around £150...With the added bonus of filming what you see ?

E2A this type of thing..


edit on 13-12-2015 by ken10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 03:43 PM
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You might also try www.stellarium.org until You pick one out. With this site, You punch in what sky You want to see...


Astronomy is looking UP!...



posted on Dec, 22 2015 @ 04:27 AM
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a reply to: ken10

Great for the moon (need a good heavy tripod) but not good for Stars/Nebulae due to the limited ISO.
A telescope fitted with a HD webcam probably give better results.

If you can wait 18 mths and be prepared to pay around £400 I reckon there will be second hand Sony A7s's available which give realistic imaging with 3rd gen NV type light intensification.







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