It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

I cooked Hardtack today: an everlasting food

page: 1
26
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
share:
+4 more 
posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:27 PM
link   
I was searching the web for different survival information, out of curiosity, when I happened to run across a few types of foods that essentially have an infinite shelf life. Maple Syrup, Honey, Salt, Rice, Cornstarch, Sugar, Vanilla Extract, Vinegar, Liqour, and so on. However, I rarely see actual recipes that make an everlasting food.

If you are a civil war buff, you already know what Hardtack is. Hardtack was the Union soldiers’ main source of food because it was cheap to
make, easy to transport, and lasted a long time. Apparently, there's still some Hardtack that was made in the civil war that exists today! So, I was interested and decided to make a very small batch



The recipe I used was:


3 cups of white flour
2 teaspoons of salt (optional)
1 cup of water
A cookie sheet
A mixing bowl
A knife
A common nail (i used a fork)

Preheat oven to 375°f (190°c) > Mix all ingredients > use a roller to flatten (to about 1/2 inch - 1 inch thick) > cut into 9 squares > Poke a few holes in the top > put on a baking sheet and bake for 30 min > flip and bake for another 30 min > let cool, done!

I ended up using half the amount of ingredients just to test it out, and they are actually pretty good! Rock hard, but can be soaked in milk/coffee/gravy or what have you, but still pretty good by themselves. although I'd probably use half the amount of salt next time. So, I'm thinking I might make another small batch and stick in the vehicle in case there's a time I may need it. And when I get to building a in-ground cellar/shelter, I'm definitely adding several large batches in there.

So, my question for you guys here is: What other foods and other recipes do you know of that can produce everlasting food, or food that will last for years (without a special technique for storage, such as canning)?







posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:31 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147

Right now I can't think of any that doesn't need special storage or canning.
If I find something I will add it here.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:38 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147
I used to make hard tack a lot when I couldn't afford food. I liked it.
It's easy to make and cheap. It also lasts quite a long time if it's stored properly.
edit on 12-12-2015 by Skid Mark because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:40 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147
Flour is food?



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:40 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147

We do this in PR but we call them arepas and they used to be fried back in the days in lard.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:45 PM
link   
a reply to: marg6043
Now there ya go!
Flour and fat! Now that is food!



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:46 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147

I bought egg laying chickens. Even if they stop producing u can still eat them. Grow cactus, there's not much work in that. Network with trustworthy neighbors who u can barter with. Does hard tack have any nutritional value? Jared fruits and veggies?
Don't get too wrapped up in prepping to where you forget to enjoy each day for the blessing it is. I'm good if I go or stay, either way I'm with Jesus.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:49 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

Actually during the depression this type of food became the main course for families that could not afford anything else, my grandfather used to tell stories of how they will eat root vegetables boil in salty water with a dressing base in oil, garlic and peppers, sometimes that was all the food that was there to eat.

Still people survived and fat they were not.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:55 PM
link   
a reply to: marg6043
I didn't mean the people are fat, I meant cooking flour in fat.

My parents were young during the depression and were starting my family during the rationing of WWII. In those days, in the world they lived in, they (we) thrived. We always had food because my father was a waterman. We were fortunate to be in the place we were (and are).



edit on 12/12/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:55 PM
link   
Jerky is an obvious one. Vacuum pack and it lasts indefinitely. You don't need a dehydrator or smoker either but smoking is the best IMO.

Here's an oven recipe for beef jerky.

INGREDIENTS
1 pound boneless top round steak or London broil, trimmed of fat
1/4 cup liquid smoke
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
1-1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper, or to taste

PREPARATION

Wrap beef in plastic wrap and freeze 30 to 60 minutes until firm, but not rock hard. (This makes it easier to slice evenly.) Using a sharp knife, slice the beef across the grain into thin strips about 1/4-inch thick.

Place liquid smoke, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, and cayenne pepper in a large zip-top freezer bag. Seal and squish to combine. Place beef strips in the marinade, re-seal, and toss to coat.

Open bag, squeeze out all the air, seal, and refrigerate for 12 hours or overnight.

Preheat oven to 250 F.

Drain meat strips from marinade and pat dry with paper towels. Place a baking rack inside a jellyroll pan. Arrange beef strips on the rack in a single layer with room in between for air circulation. Bake for about 4 hours, until dry to the touch. Remove from oven and let air-dry in a cool dry place for another 24 hours.

Store in a covered container or ziptop bag.

Yield: about 3/4 pound beef jerky

Note:

Make sure you trim All the fat from your meat. This method will work for red meats such a Venison, Moose, Buffalo etc.

You can even do fish but the shelf life is limited so salting or pickling is more effective.

Some links to help you out:

Wilderness Survival

Northern Bushcraft


T
edit on 12/12/2015 by Kukri because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:59 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147

It was also popular during the wars in Middle Earth, order now!



Good job on your mini batch, it looks great.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 09:02 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

My grandfather had a farm he have to sell the land and he kept some of the animals moving to a smaller place, he had to feed his large family of 15 children at the time.

So food was whatever was available, I remember when I was young going to my grandfathers home and always was a pot of soup warm in the stove every single day, my mother said that in hard times soups made from bones will fed a family for days.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 09:02 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147

I'm making some right now, cant wait to try it



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 09:05 PM
link   
I'm going to cook some of these, water down some rum and pretend I'm a pirate and not dIrt poor this holidays



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 09:11 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: marg6043
Now there ya go!
Flour and fat! Now that is food!

Now that was funny! I enjoy your humor.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 09:12 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147

See edited original post for added links and notes.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 09:13 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147

Buckets, Mylar Bags, Oxy abosorbers.

Then get a bunch of dried beans and rice. Place bags in bucket, fill, throw in oxy absorbents (which usually come with the bags) vacuum out air, seal with a cloths iron or flat curling iron.

Other than that most canned food will last for decades. The date on a can is pretty much meaningless. I still used baked beans today that expired in 2006 and they are fine.

Exceptions to this rule are high acid foods like tomatoes. Another exception is mushrooms, they rot a can quickly.

But your standard stuff like beef stew, spam, corn, etc lasts for years and years.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 09:14 PM
link   
a reply to: Indigent


water down some rum

Grog.

Got an eye patch? Peg leg? Say "arrrr?"

You qualify!



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 09:31 PM
link   
a reply to: Ghost147


A Utah man has unearthed a McDonald's hamburger
he bought in 1999 - and the sandwich looks exactly the
same as the day it was first flipped.
However, even he was shocked to see that the hamburger
still looks the same a whopping 14 years later.
'It wasn't on purpose,' Whipple told TV show 'The Doctors,'
of his decision to keep the burger for such a long time.
McDonald's: The burger was bought at McDonald's in July 1999

www.dailymail.co.uk...

I think the hard tack may be a better option though !



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 09:32 PM
link   
a reply to: Kukri

Thanks for the recipe. I definitely want to make some jerky, both in an oven and through the aboriginals' smoking techniques.


originally posted by: Abysha
a reply to: Ghost147

It was also popular during the wars in Middle Earth, order now!



Good job on your mini batch, it looks great.



Haha, I totally forgot about that. I always thought it was more of a shortbread cookie type thing, versus a cracker taste/texture.

Speaking of which, I should definitely make shortbread cookie shaped lembas bread



new topics

top topics



 
26
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join