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Role of Gravity / Time in a Nuclear Reaction?

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posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 05:38 PM
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Posing a question to nuclear engineers/scientists, if I may.
When a pellet of fissionable material is compressed by the triggering detonation, the mass of the pellet increases, so does the gravity and time flow. Now we observe the nuclear blast from our time frame where ambient time flows slower. So what role does gravity and time flow play in the pellet that is exploding? Does it basically affect the equation e = mc2?




posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 05:42 PM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

With mass and gravity increasing exponentially time will slow, not speed up.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 05:46 PM
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well brighter minds than mine will respond soon enough however.


AFAIK the (density) of the pellet is altered due to the compression pulse however
the mass of an individual pellet remains the same as you have not added any matter to the pellet.
as for time and gravity they are not effected at all as there is nowhere near enough mass or energy
in an average nuclear detonation.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 05:49 PM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

real quick thought gravity is different at every single point in the world no matter how small it is. when i say different i mean every mathematical equation is different everywhere.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 05:57 PM
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"compressed by the triggering detonation, the mass of the pellet increases"

Think density increases not mass otherwise it would make a mockery of the Law of Conservation of Mass. So the layman within thinks time isn't affected at all.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 06:05 PM
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originally posted by: Nochzwei
Posing a question to nuclear engineers/scientists, if I may.
When a pellet of fissionable material is compressed by the triggering detonation, the mass of the pellet increases, so does the gravity and time flow. Now we observe the nuclear blast from our time frame where ambient time flows slower. So what role does gravity and time flow play in the pellet that is exploding? Does it basically affect the equation e = mc2?

The mass does not increase. Well not unless the compression occurs at near light speed, which it doesn't. The density increases though. Basically the atoms are closer together making the chain reaction more likely to occur. It's not really the mass that changes to energy but the energy binding the nuclei together that reduces. The binding energy of the fission products are less than the binding energy of the original nuclei.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: yorkshirelad

It does increase, it goes from u235 to u236, fission then to u233. The lost atomic energy is the blast.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 06:13 PM
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a reply to: glend


Law of Conservation of Mass


Not to mention angular momentum.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 06:29 PM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

The mass of the pellet remains unchanged. It is its density that changes.

Similarly, the speed of light remains constant.

So the glib answer is that the total energy value also remains unchanged.

This, however, does not account at all for the spatial distribution of that energy.

To properly define the energy from a specific local 'chunk' of that pellet one would have to use the expanded form of Einstein's most famous equation: E²=(mc²)²+(pc)² In this equation, the 'p' value represents the kinetic momentum of the chunk.

Knowing that p=mv we can expand the equation further to: E²=(mc²)²+((mv)c)² which gives us the new value of velocity in the equation.

Knowing also that v=distance over time, we can further expand the equation to E²=(mc²)²+((m(d/t))c)² We then can deal with the energy from a part of the pellet from any particular relative frame of reference.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 06:53 PM
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originally posted by: Vector99
a reply to: Nochzwei

With mass and gravity increasing exponentially time will slow, not speed up.
According to me time speeds up as mass and gravity increases. Tho this is opp to GR



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 06:58 PM
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originally posted by: glend
"compressed by the triggering detonation, the mass of the pellet increases"

Think density increases not mass otherwise it would make a mockery of the Law of Conservation of Mass. So the layman within thinks time isn't affected at all.

Hmm man made laws? Are statements and not laws



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 07:42 PM
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I'm no nuclear physicist (nor do I play one on TV), but isn't the pellet being bombarded with neutrons and protons? If the pellet absorbs these particles then its mass must increase. No?



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 07:52 PM
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a reply to: Shadoefax

It doesn't absorb them. They cause the nucleus to split. That's why it's called fission.

The OP is talking about velocity increasing the mass of the activating pellet (as used in the Hiroshima bomb) due to relativistic effects but doesn't really seem to understand how a nuclear reaction works. He seems to be talking about a nuclear bomb (hence "detonation"). In the first place, relativistic speeds are not obtained. Secondly it is not so much the compression of the nuclear material which causes the detonation, it is the fact that the fissionable material is suddenly brought to supercritical mass. The fissionable material is unstable, naturally releasing neutrons. With less than critical mass a chain reaction does not begin because there are not enough neutrons to overcome the natural damping effect of the mass. When critical mass is reached (by jamming the fissionable material together) the number of neutrons flying around within the crammed together material is enough to light the whole thing up. There are a few ways to accomplish this but it they all amount to the same thing, bringing the material to supercritical mass.
www.odec.ca...
upload.wikimedia.org...

edit on 12/12/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:22 PM
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A lot of this stuff has been partially declassified.
Bhangmeter analysis of Teller light etc.

www.nv.doe.gov...

Then there was that “Vela Incident" that might give more clues about timing.
edit on 12-12-2015 by Slichter because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:30 PM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

Yes agree, maths is a language that describes our reality, nothing more.



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 08:31 PM
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a reply to: glend
A tool.
To describe some aspects of reality.

edit on 12/12/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2015 @ 10:40 PM
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originally posted by: Nochzwei
Posing a question to nuclear engineers/scientists, if I may.
When a pellet of fissionable material is compressed by the triggering detonation, the mass of the pellet increases, so does the gravity and time flow. Now we observe the nuclear blast from our time frame where ambient time flows slower. So what role does gravity and time flow play in the pellet that is exploding? Does it basically affect the equation e = mc2?


Welp, there's something left out here - since you said 'pellet' I assume you're talking about laser ablation fusion? You don't make it clear.

But the mass doesn't change at all. In fact, it's becoming less and less as the ablation proceeds.

The change in density is remarkable, but nowhere near enough to cause noticeable changes in metric.



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 12:06 AM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

Density, and mass are two different things......

Density does not change an objects apparent gravity.

Mass would, how ever the mass of the object remains the same.

The pellets Gravity has not changed through out the compression, and detonation.



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 01:13 AM
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a reply to: glend
Doesn't time require an observer?



posted on Dec, 13 2015 @ 01:14 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

That depends on your point of view.




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