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How This Town Produces No Trash

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posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 02:36 AM
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So, today is the day I took out the trash from our house. My wife and I produce about 1 large bag of garbage and 1 large bag of recycle every 1.5-2 weeks. (and trying to reduce that all the time) I open up the garage and to the house on my right there are a good 10 extra large garbage bag stuffed full, some broken open, no recycle. On the house to my left there are about 8 extra large garbage bags piled up on top of each other, no recycle bags. Lastly, on the house across the street there are about 15 extra large garbage bags, some boxes full of stuff, some kids toys, and a fish tank, no recycle bag.

Right house is a small family of 4. Left house is a small family of 4. House across the street is a single couple, and every week they all have roughly the same amount of garbage.

It makes me wonder exactly what they are going through to produce that much waste every single week, no exceptions. Furthermore, it makes me wonder how that mentality really forms to begin with, and how we could possibly teach others to use less, while saving more money, having a higher quality of life, and wasting much less.

This video shows a town that seems to be on the right track, and I would love to see this type of action taking place in my city. Hopefully, it's not just wishful thinking.


edit on 10/12/15 by Ghost147 because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 02:54 AM
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There's 2 in my house and we put out 1 large tote per week, that fits about 5 large bags of garbage. I always recycle. Sometimes a recycle tote and a a laundry basket for the recycling. I could probably find more things to recycle.

Excellent video!
edit on 10-12-2015 by reldra because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 02:57 AM
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Sometimes its pretty easy to cut down on the trash you generate.

I do remember hearing that the Germans solved a lot of it by basically unpackaging items at the shop so the shop had to pay for the removal of like cardboard sleeves around microwave packaging etc so suddenly things got redesigned.

IT kit is probably the hardest for the average person to recycle other than to pass it on to a specialist recycler but a lot of this sort of effort costs money and in a small town its probably possible to vet everything coming in and out but the effort of searching through a major towns trash does become a lot harder and more expensive



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 03:07 AM
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a reply to: Ghost147

Excellent thread Ghost!

It speaks to the true essence of humanity, community, responsibility and connection to the earth!

What an inspiring story, it honestly gives me hope. I fully believe there is not task that we collectively can not over come! It reminds me of Sweden and how they have made such advancements in incineration.

Imagine what it will be like when we utilize hemp and create non-toxic forms of so much of our current waste!


edit on America/ChicagoThursdayAmerica/Chicago12America/Chicago1231amThursday4 by elementalgrove because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 04:38 AM
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a reply to: Ghost147

Where I live they actually CHARGE to recycle. So as you can imagine I don't recycle and frankly I don't have any motivation to reduce trash. Where is the incentive?



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 04:57 AM
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a reply to: Metallicus

That's pretty ridiculous (the charging part). As for the motivation to reduce trash, that can be answered from any recycle/waste management program.




Why is reducing waste important?

Not only does it cost a lot of money, energy and natural resources to manufacture and transport new products, it also costs a great deal to transport and process these products once we're done with them. The more waste we put in the ground, the more our landfills release methane gas (a contributor to climate change), as well as leachate, a toxic sludge that can kill plants and animals and contaminate our water supplies.

Simply put, waste causes pollution, contributes to climate change and squanders more money, energy and natural resources than most of us realize. Making small changes we make in our everyday lives can make a powerful difference to the health of all living things and the province and planet we call home.

link

It costs you less money directly, when you buy products that don't have excessive packaging, because it's related to the cost. Less waste means less government spending on processing this waste and garbage, filling and maintaining landfills, and thus using taxes for other purposes.

Not only that, but the food that has no packaging at all tend to be whole foods (vegetables, fruits), so you're eating healthier, and able to use the waste from those foods in composts, among other things. Making food yourself instead of buying premade, prepackaged foods is excessively less expensive, and healthier, and far less wasteful.


edit on 10/12/15 by Ghost147 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 05:14 AM
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a reply to: Ghost147

We used to recycle.

We no longer do. The reason? Our council are complicit in wasting our time. Only a tiny portion of the bags assigned for recycling in our region, actually reach a recycling plant. The rest merely end up in landfill, just like the non-recyclable bags do. We also pay our local council a fair whack of money, to deal with our trash. For the money we pay, we ought to get all our recyclables recycled. Hell, for the cost of council tax, we should have the trash sorted for us at the plant, but not only do we have to sort our own, but the bags we send out do not, in the main, actually see the inside of the recycling facility.

The thing of it is, that I am very interested in the potential of recycled materials to reduce the cost of everything from components of gadgets, to housebuilding materials, which would give the common man a boost in a time when prices are on the up for many things, and wages are not meeting the demands associated therewith.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 05:24 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

In many cases, it seems to be more of an issue of how things are run, rather than the people themselves. Heck, even in the OP video it shows how much an established system makes a difference.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 07:57 AM
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My city, who uses a private company for trash pick up, gives 2 cans, one green for regular trash, a blue one for recycling. They quickly alienated everyone, because they charge to pick it up, then make money from selling the aluminum cans and paper. They then had the nerve to raise rates, because they weren't making enough. Now,, instead of sorting, everyone just throws everything in to both cans. The company threatened to raise rates again, till quite a few people said they'd either take it off themselves or just hire a local person with a pickup to do it. Several said, since they had pickups and a trailer, they'd just start their own trash business.
That company quickly changed their minds.
They were not very effective anyway. They'd only take a very limited type of plastics and would not take magazines and things like pizza boxes, just newspaper. No glass at all, it just went straight to the dump. Only things they could easily sort to make a quick buck.
I carefully sorted my garbage, only to find most was going to the dump anyway.
edit on 10-12-2015 by DAVID64 because: typo



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 08:18 AM
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It's easy to generate bags and bags of waste. Start by buying bottled water, soft drinks and packets of orange juice/apple juice. That will generate a couple of bags a week. Drink wine and beer, and that will generate another bag of glass bottles and beer cans. Buy ready made packaged meals with cardboard boxes and plastic trays - that's another couple of black bag to go into the landfill.

The worst packaged items I ever encountered were a type of cheesy biscuit in the 1990's that consisted of:
One external cardboard presentation box, a large plastic tray with plastic seal, four smaller plastic trays eith individual plastic wraps.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 08:37 AM
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a reply to: DAVID64

Man, there seems to be so many cases where recycling companies just destroy the whole concept for everyone. It's really disappointing to see.


originally posted by: stormcell
It's easy to generate bags and bags of waste. Start by buying bottled water, soft drinks and packets of orange juice/apple juice. That will generate a couple of bags a week. Drink wine and beer, and that will generate another bag of glass bottles and beer cans.


Actually, none of them were bottles/glass. Our province has an awesome price return for all those things, so people tend to bring them to the bottle depot right away.


originally posted by: stormcell
Buy ready made packaged meals with cardboard boxes and plastic trays - that's another couple of black bag to go into the landfill.

The worst packaged items I ever encountered were a type of cheesy biscuit in the 1990's that consisted of:
One external cardboard presentation box, a large plastic tray with plastic seal, four smaller plastic trays eith individual plastic wraps.


Even when I was living with my family (of 5) we still only produced 2 bags a week of garbage. I still try to wrap my head around how the couple across the alley can produce more garbage each week than the two families of 4 on both sides of me. Even with all of what you mentioned, it just seems impossible! My mind is still blown



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 12:00 PM
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originally posted by: Metallicus
a reply to: Ghost147

Where I live they actually CHARGE to recycle. So as you can imagine I don't recycle and frankly I don't have any motivation to reduce trash. Where is the incentive?


No incentive there at all. Crazy.
I live rurally, so there's no pickup of anything. Recycling is free, and garbage bags are $2 each to dump.
I recycle almost all glass, plastics, tin, styrofoam, papers, cardboard.
Compost everything compostable.
Down to about a bag a month, maybe 2.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 12:19 PM
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Most councils here in Australia issue 3 bins to each household: A yellow bin for recycling, a green bin for green waste and a red bin for the rest. Yellow and green bins are collected fortnightly and the red weekly by separate trucks. It works out really well.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 12:40 PM
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Excellent video and what a gorgeous town!
There was a time I was seriously considering moving to Japan.
This brings back that desire.

First, I think packaging should be standardized among the industry and made simpler for recycling purposes.
Anything with too much packaging on it I generally refuse to buy.
I also avoid ordering online as those are the worst for generating waste.
You get a box inside bubble wrap inside another box inside of plastic bags, ridiculous.

More development needs to go in to creating biodegradable packaging.
Remember, all we're seeing is the consumer end of a product.
We don't see all the chemicals, oil and electricity it took to produce it or ship it.
Allowing our rail system to decay is a big mistake and could do much more in terms of moving items around the country.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 12:45 PM
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My recycling is twice my trash, and recycle truck comes every other week whereas trash comes once a week. I wish recycle came every week and trash once a month even would be enough.



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 04:06 PM
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I live in a city of about 2 million. Houses get 2 cans - one for trash and one for recycle. Trash is a weekly pickup, and recycling is 1 time a month. Many of us leave cans out that a few people will pick up though because we have centers close that pay for aluminum. We also have a fee-to-dump portion of the waste center for larger items. The city also picks up bags of leaves if you buy these particular paper bags for a few dollars each. Otherwise things like branches or plant matter is picked up 3 times a year.

Our family makes an effort to recycle cans, glass, paper, and cardboard. We also cut down on things like plastic bags, and all our stores allow you to bring reusable ones. In fact, one store ONLY offers you to bring bags. Otherwise, you can pick out their cardboard boxes to carry out groceries. They have NO bags. We also don't eat out much, so we don't have food and drink containers like a lot of families.

Our city has electronic recycling and disposal as well as semi-toxic things like paint or oil.

MANY families like ours have compost stations that we use for food waste that also cuts down on trash. People here also grow gardens or shop at the farmer's market...which cuts down on store packaging waste too.

We also do bike rentals and have bike/moped lanes, and many people walk. For an urban area, it's easier to cut down on car usage because you can walk to the store or shops. Our city makes it easy and worthwhile to do small things that add up. Even for those who argue against climate change validity can't argue with cutting down on that stuff...even if it's not a problem, there's no reason to produce so much waste if we don't have to!



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 04:25 PM
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We live out where Jesus lost his sandles so we have no pickup service except for trash if you don't want to drive it to the dump yourself. Wish we had recycling as I have a giant pile of cardboard stacking up to burn next cool night...



posted on Dec, 10 2015 @ 05:25 PM
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originally posted by: Metallicus
a reply to: Ghost147

Where I live they actually CHARGE to recycle. So as you can imagine I don't recycle and frankly I don't have any motivation to reduce trash. Where is the incentive?


A lot of places charge for the pickup of recycles but you can take them to the dump or a recycle bin somewhere in town for free maybe you should check. The incentive is a better world.



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