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Kids Busted for Pot, Forced to be Snitches by Cops – Sent to their Deaths in the War on Drugs

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posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 01:37 AM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct

originally posted by: paradoxious

originally posted by: luthier
Try a little empathy.

I have empathy, and sympathy for the kids being short-changed by both the parents and the education system in the US.


I find it oddly humorous that my 10yo nephew asks why things now aren't like they were depicted on Little House on the Prairie. All I can really tell him is that times change, things change, and now people like Nellie are in charge.



You're short changing your nephew by not explaining that America was Never as it was depicted in Little House on the Prairie, which was very loosely based on Laura Ingalls Wilders real life pioneer family who....skipped out on paying rent, incurred massive debt, were incredibly racist...etc etc etc.
Interesting reply. Maybe I am short changing him. But what would you rather him see?

Truth told, my family grew up in that era, albeit around Oklahoma and points not so far north, but LHOTP basically summed up what my parents and grandparents lived through. I'd love to get them here to tell you first-hand, but sadly, time has taken its toll.

So, I have the choice of saying to him, "my family lived like that" or "Hollywood changed the story and it was nothing like that".

Which truth should I tell him- the one my family lived through or the one TV told?

I've already been through this with him, and he knows both sides.


Still, though, not sure what this has to do with a college aged woman involved with drugs.


edit on 9-12-2015 by paradoxious because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 02:48 AM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

Kids Busted for Pot, Forced to be Snitches by Cops – Sent to their Deaths in the War on Drugs.

A clear sign America is sliding into the abyss of tyranny.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 03:27 AM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

Andrew sadek was going to ndscs in wahpeton, nd. Sorry it was a big story when it happened. They found his body in the river with a gun shot wound to the head and was wearing a backpack full of rocks. The local police wrote it off as a suicide.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 03:35 AM
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originally posted by: Miznchops
a reply to: dreamingawake

Andrew sadek was going to ndscs in wahpeton, nd. Sorry it was a big story when it happened. They found his body in the river with a gun shot wound to the head and was wearing a backpack full of rocks. The local police wrote it off as a suicide.



Good for sharing. Didn't have the time to change his last name to the correct one on the OP.


Additional information source:



Sadek, who attended the state College of Science in Wahpeton, was arrested in April of 2013 after he allegedly sold marijuana to an informant on two separate occasions. One transaction was for $20 and the other was for $60. But because the alleged sales took place in a "school zone," the crimes were considered major felonies, according to the AP.

Sadek signed on to become an informant shortly after his arrest. According to the report, Sadek sold drugs on behalf of the task force in November and December of 2013 and January of 2014.


Source - HPost



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 03:53 AM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

Unfortunately, stories like Rachel's and Andrew's happen all the time. I once knew a guy from wahp who snitched on a few of his friends before he moved to Fargo and his reason was that it is just a circle of that life and if you don't want to sit in jail you can snitch because if you don't, someone else will anyway.

I've been asked to snitch over possession of weed pipes, they say they can drop the charges, but a year of unsupervised probation isn't so bad compared to getting messed with because of snitching.

People should learn their rights and if ever encounter a situation like this should do their homework in the case before just accepting any kind of deals.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 03:59 AM
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You don't snitch. Ever.
If you get busted, you do your time and pay your fines.
Snitches end up in ditches.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 04:03 AM
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a reply to: skunkape23
There is a shirt with a pistol on it that says " snitches, a dying breed"



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 05:09 AM
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originally posted by: rukia
a reply to: luthier

You can always have a public defender. That's your right, legally. She must have agreed to a really bad deal. It's tragic.

a reply to: GBP/JPY

That's nuts dude. It's called get a lawyer and don't say a word. And anyone who rats on a dealer is totally classless scum. But they don't deserve to die or anything. And that's why you don't mess with dealers of any kind. Because they always have guns. It's just insane that she'd agree. I cannot wrap my mind around it. Why didn't she just jump out of the car? Like...why...?


All dealers have guns? Haha that's the dumbest thing I've EVER heard of.

Try telling that to half of my old high school friends and myself included that used to be in the "Buisness"

LMFAO



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 07:38 AM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

This is despicable. It's extortion, exploitation and coercion.... all under color of law and perpetrated by law enforcement officials. I understand that people in power will abuse that power. What I will never understand is why others make excuses for those with the most power and responsibility, but will demand the highest standard from the one with the least power and responsibility. Nothing good happens when bullies are given free reign.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 07:42 AM
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originally posted by: CharlieSpeirs
Police have been doing this for decades...

But let's be real here...
No one is forced into snitchin.

It's a conscious decision solely by the snitch.


It shouldn't even be a decision in the first place. People shouldn't be arrested for using drugs at all.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 07:45 AM
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And anyone who rats on a dealer is totally classless scum


That's funny, he he, laugh, laugh.

After all, drug dealers are such upstanding members of the community and their business dealings are so above board.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 08:21 AM
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a reply to: dreamingawake




How is it deceptive when what they did to her is beyond deceptive?


Because they gave her a choice , granted two sucky choices but a choice nonetheless and it was not done by FORCE as the click bait title suggests.

Of all the stupid things Hollywood gets wrong what happens to snitches is not one of them. There is no way that anyone functional person in this country that is not aware of the dangers if you snitch on a drug dealer. A big one at that.

Like I said the drug laws in this country are likely more harmful than good, but in no way can they say she was FORCED when they gave her an option.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 08:30 AM
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originally posted by: CharlieSpeirs
a reply to: ghostrager

Most do.

Some don't.


That's where parenting skills come into play.


Most of the action/consequence wiring in the brain is still forming in young adults, which is why they regularly indulge in risky behavior; no matter how good their parents "skills" are.

This one is nature not nurture.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 08:56 AM
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a reply to: CharlieSpeirs

I dunno...the case is pretty strong. You have adults trained in the art of subterfuge leveraging their authority against an immature mind that has much more difficulty sorting out the risk/reward involved in the situation.

You can convince a doe eyed kid to do anything if you threaten to tell mommy



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 10:20 AM
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a reply to: CharlieSpeirs




4 years for possession or snitch.


These are young adults right? I highly doubt these kids had much choice either way, it was probably take the 4 year sentence or become a police informant for drug related crimes and they destroy your criminal record after a few years of working for them. If they chose the sentence, they'd have a tough time making a living as an ex con.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 10:46 AM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

WTF were the cops thinking? How does a recreational user go from buying a few pills here and there to 1,500 pills in one night? Who does that? Not even an addict would do that. The dealers aren't stupid, of course they knew she was a snitch when she walked up to them with 13,000 dollars and asked to buy 1,500 pills. That's just outright dumb.

The cops murdered this girl as surely as if they pulled the trigger themselves. If they wanted to bust the dealer they should have used an undercover cop and bought a more reasonable amount.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: dreamingawake

Actually, they are not--they would just prefer to do that rather than go to jail.

I got caught with weed a LOT as a teenager, and was never approached with anything like this. This is a very, very small amount of people who seem to be buying from dealers in which the LEOs have a heavy interest in arresting.

I had a very misspent youth, and I never heard of anyone I knew getting approached to do any of this. Yes, it's anecdotal, but it's pretty obvious that this happens more in TV shows than it does across the country in real life.

But you can't legislate away stupidity, but you also can't imply that using CIs to arrest people in a local community who are doing something illegal (or some things illegal) is a bad thing. In fact, people in their communities need to step up MORE to help out LEOs in their quest to rid the streets of illegal activities.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 02:42 PM
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originally posted by: CharlieSpeirs
a reply to: dreamingawake

I read it.

4 years for possession or snitch.

Some people would choose the sentence.


Choose being the operative word.


You can still be coerced, it's the same way they get plea bargains. Give the person a disproportionate number of charges so that the deal results in a lesser charge on average.


originally posted by: rukia
You can always have a public defender. That's your right, legally. She must have agreed to a really bad deal. It's tragic.


Not true. In many states including Florida you do not always get a public defender anymore. The PD's are overloaded and they just don't have the people to assign them to every case, if you demand a PD you could spend years in sitting in jail waiting for your case to goto court. Florida also charges you for a PD regardless of your ability to pay. If you get a PD, you have to pay the state for it and if you don't you goto jail for contempt of court.

John Oliver did a pretty good segment on this a couple months ago.
edit on 9-12-2015 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 02:50 PM
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originally posted by: CharlieSpeirs
Police have been doing this for decades...

But let's be real here...
No one is forced into snitchin.

It's a conscious decision solely by the snitch.


Pretty sure it fits the bill of extortion or blackmail pretty well. Let's be real here, police don't like snitches neither, and they are no different than criminals in this department. In fact they are much better at keeping snitches out of their ranks, or intimidating anyone from trying.

The only difference here is there isn't some giant organization picking up police officers and threatening to send them to jail for the rest of their life, or setting them up purposely so they can get that person to snitch on another one.

How this was ever legal to begin with is nuts. The way it developed however, if you went back in time and told people involved that the current climate was the likely result, I don't think they'd believe it. For some, maybe they were insane enough hoping it would turn out like this. But its not an acceptable function of law enforcement and interaction with society.

The fact that 1 in 3 in America has a criminal record is a testament to that. The stats are much worse I believe to, but don't expect to see a clear picture because it puts the massive 'crime' industry in a bad light.



posted on Dec, 9 2015 @ 03:35 PM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: dreamingawake
In fact, people in their communities need to step up MORE to help out LEOs in their quest to rid the streets of illegal activities.



In my opinion, the whole "snitches get stitches" mantra enables the destruction of communities. Communities which may contain some very good people who do not have the means to relocate. If the percentage of residents buying into the self-destructive meme reaches a critical mass, the good people have very little choice other than support the local status quo. Its essentially imprisonment in a slightly different way than normal, but with many of the same problems. The criminals don't care if they go to an "official" prison, since they likely have connections and infrastructure on the inside, and law-abiding good folk can't escape their prison on the outside.

All that said, I can't say I have an issue with non-violent dealers. Its when violent crimes become part of the business plan that I personally draw a line. I think there is a really important distinction to be made there.

The amount of non-violent people in prisons is an issue. Given the environment, it has a higher likelihood of exacerbating the problems for everyone, including the non-violent inmate. Then again, perhaps that is the whole idea. Encourage escalating criminality through environment in order to grow business..



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