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Scientists Figure Out What Type of Person Believes BS

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posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 01:22 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit


Because I have a significant grasp of the English language

Thanks for letting us know. What exactly does your grasp of the English language signify?




posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 03:01 AM
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a reply to: Astyanax

I aids comprehension of sentences constructed to fool the unwary. If you know what words mean, it is harder for a scammer to put them in an order which sounds important, unless their BS is at least well researched. Most BS is poorly researched, and is easily identified by someone who understands the language well enough to spot the rot.



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 05:56 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

So you contend that BS is always sloppily written, do you?



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 06:18 AM
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a reply to: Astyanax

No. As my what, second or third post, quite a long one I might add, makes clear, some BS is very well put together, powerful, psychologically effective, essentially weaponised psychology. But the vast majority of the day to day BS that people encounter? Advertising for example? Yes, most of it is written poorly. Think about make up commercials, for example. Non science terms, designed to sound to the untrained and inattentive ear, like proper parlance. That is just one example.



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 06:20 AM
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a reply to: boncho




Was wondering if this study would grab traction on ATS. Sadly the bullsnip study is bullsnip.



Who do you think the participants were in this study...ATS members.



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 06:23 AM
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a reply to: Astyanax




So you contend that BS is always sloppily written, do you?


Obviously that isn't true just look at some of the stories in the media around the world.

BS stories written so well that they become threads right here on ATS.



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 06:29 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis

I'm disappointed that the test wasn't put online so anyone could take it. I'm not interested in the .pdf as it doesn't have any of the test questions and as such is utterly pointless.



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 07:57 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit


quite a long one I might add

Yes, it was, wasn't it?

Do you ever read what you write aloud to yourself? I strongly recommend it.



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 08:06 AM
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a reply to: Astyanax

Yes I do.

That happens at the end of each paragraph, and then once more when the whole thing has been completed, just before hitting the post button.

Why do you ask?



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 08:25 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Because that's usually quite a good way to eliminate clunkiness.



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 08:32 AM
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Read some legal documents and find the BS in there, just because it is phrased in such a way and a comma could be here but it is somewhere else changes the meaning of the entire document.

A lot of the documents are in order according to the judge who has the final word in judging the end meaning of the document, even if they are frivolous and nonsensical the judge will pass the benefit to the plaintiff who has more money for a better lawyer.

In the end, BS or not, it is up in the air.

And then we add ignorant jurors to the mix who actually don't know it is unlawful for a judge to instruct them as to the decision making process toward a verdict, being removed from that process as he is by the jurors.

I don't believe anything any more.

It's cold here, but not dark.



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 08:34 AM
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a reply to: Astyanax

My preferred method is to read old books. The language is better, richer, less stunted, not denuded of its power, refinement, or flair. Clunkiness aside, it is my awareness of the language and how to manipulate it which affords me the greatest advantage in dealing with the lowly BS of normal life, and offers me some assistance with exploring the frayed edges of the larger, more complicated strains of nonsense to be found in the world.

Now, enough baiting and waffle about your opinion of my post history, and let's get back squarely on topic, shall we?



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 09:39 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis

As a "born skeptic" I can only give one bit of advice on this subject.

Believe nothing you hear and only half of what you see; question the other half.

edit on 7-12-2015 by tinymind because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 09:56 AM
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Two things on this:

1) The University of Waterloo is a fine institution which does not lend itself to BS unless it is a study relevant to society.
2) I agree with TrueBrit that old books are an excellent way to clear cobwebs. The most important book anyone could read is the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbons (1737-1794). By comparing our current civilization to what happened to the Empire then, one is able to cut through an immense amount of bullcrap. Plus, like was said, the language is very clear.



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: masqua

I am fine with pieces of writing that make use of highly sophisticated language, but I utterly despise it when that language is used purely for the sake of making that piece of writing as incomprehensible and arduous to read as possible.



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 10:45 AM
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you know after posting in the other thread created today about this i thought about this old saying.


If you cant amaze them with brilliance,.. baffle them with bullsh@@.



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 10:48 AM
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a reply to: Eilasvaleleyn

Gibbon's writing style is simple and straightforward, much like Plato.

When speaking of arduous and incomprehensible, I'd say Carl G Jung fits that category in some of his more intensive studies, like The Archetypes and the Collective Unconscious (which I'm presently reading). He constantly uses (i.e.) Greek, French and Hebrew sayings without telling the reader what they mean in English. This, I find, really frustrating and I'm unwilling to use Google Translate for anything but single words. Phrases are normally too much for that function.



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 10:59 AM
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a reply to: masqua

That should be fine, then. I was mainly referencing three hundred and eighty page legal documents, typically EULAs.

Sounds like a pain. Does searching the phrases as a whole rather than trying to use GT work?
I did Psychology in high school. Interesting subject. Like Biology, incredibly mind-numbing language. Latin, in particular, is something I hate. All the words blur together (though thankfully I don't often encounter it out of species classifications.) I don't envy you, even if you're reading that book willingly.

edit on 7/12/2015 by Eilasvaleleyn because: Reasons



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 08:18 PM
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Ok, so people with poor fluid intelligence are more prone to believing in the paranormal and alternative medicine.
Well here's one of the worlds smartest men who seems to have no problem with believing in the reality of UFO'S and another guy who used alternative medicine to cure his cancer.
Seems to me those doing the study are the ones full of BS.




posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 10:05 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit


Now, enough baiting and waffle about your opinion of my post history, and let's get back squarely on topic, shall we?

I think the topic is pretty much covered, don't you?




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