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Scientists on 3 continents now have evidence: Some chimps have entered the Stone Age.

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posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 05:37 PM
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originally posted by: intergalactic fire
I've seen birds using stones to open nuts (can't remember what documentary) does that mean they also are in the stone age?

And what about this crow? What "age" is he in?

Crows using traffic to crack walnut


Crows always #buckthetrend




posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 05:40 PM
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There's footage of a Heron that steals bread from fishermen, it then sits on the riverbank just like the fishermen, and it drops some of the bread into the water. When fish come to nibble on the bread the Heron eats them.

I remember at the time the "experts" were sad because they said this gained knowledge that this Heron had acquired would die with him as he had no way to pass it on to other Herons.

I'll see if I can find the clip.

Found it.

edit on 4-12-2015 by VoidHawk because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 05:42 PM
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originally posted by: hiddenNZ
a reply to: romilo
What? monkeys coming from behind? Whats next...gay rights for monkeys?



Yup
that could be the reason why monkeys are so far behind of their "cousin, man", they did have evolution plans backwords, ouch.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 05:46 PM
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originally posted by: intergalactic fire
No idea what that article is saying or what evidence there is for those claims. 2 paragraphs of blabla and a bunch of photos to fill up space.

I believe this to be a bunch of nonsense, they even claim Spain has given some human rights to apes.

Many countries like New Zealand and the U.K. have banned experiments on chimpanzees and other apes, and some others, like Spain, have gone as far as to grant them limited human rights.

I really wonder what those human rights are, it can't be much if you're familiar with their politics.
Gotta watch out what you're doing these days when walking around in the streets of Spain.


Strange but true, during WW I, a South African monkey was promoted to corporal



The friendly & highly intelligent monkey became a great favourite with the other soldiers & was made the regimental mascot & was issued with rations, a uniform & a pay book !!!


This monkey was promoted to the rank of corporal & given a medal for bravery... just saying



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 05:54 PM
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Check this out.

Domesticating dogs

Seems they're ahead of the evolutionary game.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 05:56 PM
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a reply to: NoFearsEqualsFreeMan

Yes, so was Lassie



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 05:59 PM
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I like the developing premise.
Turn it around: If there are extraterrestrials, they most likely view us with the same difference in cognizance, as we recognize attempting to study and communicate with chimps.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 06:07 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler
Chimpanzees have been observed using "tools" for half a century. Jane Goodall made her name in anthropology over her observations of this. In other words, it isn't new. Secondly, it only works if you stretch the definition to include the most elementary modification of an object to turn it into a "tool." It's not like they are making Solutrean projectile points out of flint or obsidian.



Chimps do modify, and in multi disciplines,

CHIMP BEHAVIOUR AND TOOL USE
It has been known that chimpanzees use tools like humans for over 50 years.
In 1960, Jane Goodall witnessed two chimps using twigs to fish for termites in the ground.
This was the first time that an animal was observed to make a tool and use it for a specific purpose, other than humans.
It was later found that the Gombe chimps use twigs, leaves and rocks in nine different ways to feed, drink, clean themselves, reach other objects and to fashion weapons.
In communities outside Gombe national park, communities make different tools.
Chimpanzees make sponges by chewing leaves and dipping them into puddles of water so they can use them as drinking vessels.
They have been observed using sticks and rocks to smash fruit and shells.
Adult males sometimes hurl rocks and sticks like make-shift spears to intimidate rivals.
This study says that chimps use shoots from Alchornea hirtella to hunt aggressive army ants in a specific way.
It is thought that the behaviour is passed from one generation to the next and is learned by young chimpanzees.

However they are still not as smart as us. We learned eons ago, that for comfort we needed to clean our backsides, leaves and bark, while being useful for other things didn't do the job, however a chimps fur turned out ideal.


The chimps aren't too happy about that though, but there you go! Regards, Clyde.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 06:10 PM
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Have they accepted the Lord Jesus Christ as their personal savior yet?



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 06:43 PM
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a reply to: yorkshirelad

No need to laugh or cry.

Just give me an answer that satisfies the question. Would really appreciate it.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 06:51 PM
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originally posted by: starwarsisreal
a reply to: abe froman

So Planet of the Apes is now officially a documentary.


"I need to speak to Caesar!" Dawn of the planet of the apes



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 06:54 PM
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originally posted by: InMyShell
I find it baffling that one species can evolve to where we are today while all other species have remained very similar in appearance/intelligence.

There is a massive difference between species evolving their hunting techniques and humans evolving from living in caves to traveling into space.

Can anyone explain to me why only the human species has evolved a lot more quickly than every other species.


First: humankind is not "advanced", or "better", or "further along". There is no race or end goal for a species. Our purpose is to survive, propagate, and nurture our own. A "successful human" is one that produces grandchildren and is able to close the circle (be created, be raised, create, raise, teach your progeny to create raise....that is your job as a human). We are egocentric so think of our selves, today and now, as a penultimate. When in fact we are the same as yesterday, and just a species being what our species is.

Beyond that....your answer is "exponential growth". It took us a million years to develop agriculture. Then 10000 years to get where we had a steam engine. Then 100 years to make a computer. Exponential growth....its why it will have only taken a couple of decades to get to nanotech, and another decade to see AI. From there, the world will change overnight, every night.

Exponential growth. The smarter we get, the more we know....the faster we will learn new things. Explosive, exponential growth.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 07:05 PM
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originally posted by: Swills
a reply to: Sublimecraft

I vote for Chimp over Trump all day, any day.

Entered the Stone Age eh? I will have to give this article a good read. I recently created a thread about chimps taking care of their disabled children so this news is very intriging.


Don't get too excited. There are two paragraphs with bad grammar.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 07:12 PM
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originally posted by: bloodstream7
Check this out.

Domesticating dogs

Seems they're ahead of the evolutionary game.


This is a fantastic video. I don't watch videos...but this one had to be seen.


something to consider for anyone interested in primates, or the domestication of dogs



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 07:17 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk

the real genius being shown here:

- the heron realizes when the bread isn't thrown out far enough, then uses technique to get it in "just the right" spot
- each time he casts it out, its closer and closer

He is luring the fish in closer. Not just using bait....but creating a plan with multiple steps to get the fish closer to the shore, out of their comfort zone.

That is a brilliant bird.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 07:48 PM
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a reply to: abe froman

Lots of animals use stone tools or sticks as hunting weapons and what not. The true rest is if they can pass down those skills an knowledge to their young and improve on it.
It's imagination that make us different, ours runs wild and ha almost no limits, chimps might not have that ability yet. I meaning, hitting something with a rock isn't that extraordinary.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 07:48 PM
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a reply to: abe froman

Lots of animals use stone tools or sticks as hunting weapons and what not. The true test is if they can pass down those skills an knowledge to their young and improve on it.
It's imagination that make us different, ours runs wild and ha almost no limits, chimps might not have that ability yet. I mean, hitting something with a rock isn't that extraordinary.
edit on 4-12-2015 by strongfp because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 07:58 PM
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originally posted by: Zen64
that article was complete bull#, no science in it at all. it must be an ad for something but i have no idea what.
there was no evolution in that article at all. i am pretty sure there was a similar article saying the same thing about another animal a few months back. cant remember what animal it was talking about tho.


Tea Bags ? 1971



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 08:29 PM
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originally posted by: strongfp
a reply to: abe froman

Lots of animals use stone tools or sticks as hunting weapons and what not. The true rest is if they can pass down those skills an knowledge to their young and improve on it.
It's imagination that make us different, ours runs wild and ha almost no limits, chimps might not have that ability yet. I meaning, hitting something with a rock isn't that extraordinary.


You mean like whales and dolphins have been observed doing?


Research and observations in recent years have revealed that whales and dolphins not only have the ability to learn as individuals, but those individuals can then pass their new knowledge onto others. This is a rare intelligence in the animal kingdom.



Then there’s Billie. A dolphin who became trapped in a sealock in the 1980s, she was rescued and rehabilitated in captivity before being released back into the wild just three weeks later. Scientists were amazed to see that, upon her return to the seas, she started tail-walking, a trick taught in marine parks for rewards that she must have observed, even though during those three weeks she was not trained herself. To have picked up the skill so rapidly is one thing… but Billie was soon teaching her wild companions to do the same. A remarkable example of social learning, and great intelligence.


us.whales.org...


Dolphins can also use tools to solve problems. Scientists have observed a dolphin coaxing a reluctant moray eel out of its crevice by killing a scorpion fish and using its spiny body to poke at the eel. Off the western coast of Australia, bottlenose dolphins place sponges over their snouts, which protects them from the spines of stonefish and stingrays as they forage over shallow seabeds.

A dolphin's ability to invent novel behaviours was put to the test in a famous experiment by the renowned dolphin expert Karen Pryor. Two rough-toothed dolphins were rewarded whenever they came up with a new behaviour. It took just a few trials for both dolphins to realise what was required. A similar trial was set up with humans. The humans took about as long to realise what they were being trained to do as did the dolphins. For both the dolphins and the humans, there was a period of frustration (even anger, in the humans) before they "caught on". Once they figured it out, the humans expressed great relief, whereas the dolphins raced around the tank excitedly, displaying more and more novel behaviours.


www.theguardian.com...


I was looking for a story where I recall that one dolphin was taught a game during the day in a completely separate tank from where it lived with another dolphin. After a period of time (weeks?), the other dolphin was brought to the training tank and it appeared it had already learned the game even though it had never seen the game or training tank.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 08:44 PM
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originally posted by: InMyShell
a reply to: yorkshirelad

No need to laugh or cry.

Just give me an answer that satisfies the question. Would really appreciate it.


Havnt you learned yet, never question the authority around here, never expect a reasoned logical answer either.
Good luck, let them laugh, plenty see how silly their statements are

It is a valid question




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