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This is NOT a gun problem, and if you relax that knee, you'll understand.

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posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 03:55 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Xtrozero

It means his guns weren't his legally, but if it makes it sounds better, they'll report that they were legal. In other words, someone bought them legally, and he obtained them later through fair means or foul, but those were not HIS guns that HE bought legally.

And whoever he obtained them from did not report them as stolen.

He might have paid that person in a private exchange or he might simply have been given the guns, but whoever did buy them likely has some questioning coming his or her way.



We'd have to look at California law, but in most states it is perfectly legal to sell a firearm without going through government channels.

There are Facebook groups and private forums in which owners actively buy and sell firearms.




posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 05:35 PM
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a reply to: MrMasterMinder

It's hilarious how that is always the response. I'm not republican.. I'M a decent human separating wheat from chaff



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 05:39 PM
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a reply to: rossacus

What on the world are you saying? Stats are stats.

Remember Norway? How about boko haram ?
Do you pay attention, or just spout off non truths?



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 05:41 PM
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no law can prevent mass shooting, thats the problem.

someone killing another person with a gun, IS a gun problem.

we have to get use to crazy people shooting up a large crowd because guns are here to stay.

the very same guns that protect you, also kill lots of innocent people.

its a paradox. a double sided blade. unless you can control whether crazy people can arm themselves, there will always be mass shootings.



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 05:55 PM
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a reply to: introvert

Yes, but the media is reporting it as if he bought them legally in the sense of having gone through a licensed dealer which isn't the case. They're doing it to make the case for gun control.

As for the other, there is no way to restrict that kind of sale, even with laws against it. You could never stop an individual from making a deal with his or her buddy for whatever terms they find acceptable between them. Not even passing a law will stop it. You would need someone to be there at the point of every such sale to prevent it.

Those kinds of sales are how every criminal who couldn't otherwise own a gun likely gets one if they don't simply steal it outright.


edit on 3-12-2015 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 06:32 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Oh bollux she is from Qatar nice agenda though. Kudos



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 06:45 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko

It means his guns weren't his legally, but if it makes it sounds better, they'll report that they were legal. In other words, someone bought them legally, and he obtained them later through fair means or foul, but those were not HIS guns that HE bought legally.

And whoever he obtained them from did not report them as stolen.

He might have paid that person in a private exchange or he might simply have been given the guns, but whoever did buy them likely has some questioning coming his or her way.



I know how he got them, I was just wondering why they say the guns were bought legally but he wasn't the buyer and then ended it there. I would not want to be that other person(s), and looking at this whole thing it sure looks like they were in planning for a long time and so most likely others too.



edit on 3-12-2015 by Xtrozero because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 06:16 AM
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actual economic cost of guns. The answer: $229 billion.



CO.EXIST The Staggering Costs Of Gun Violence In The U.S. Every Year If you're the kind of person who needs an economic argument: each murder costs society almost half a million dollars. When nine people were murdered in Charleston on June 17, they were among 5,793 Americans to die by gun so far this year. In an average year, the death toll from guns, including suicides, is a staggering 33,000 lives. In a recent investigation, Mother Jones looked at how much gun violence costs the country—not the deeper emotional costs, or the societal scars from the kind of racial terrorism that happened in Charleston—but the actual economic cost of guns. The answer: $229 billion. A single murder has average direct costs of almost $450,000, from the police and ambulance at the scene, to the hospital, courts, and prison for the murderer. In an average day, the country pays for 32 gun homicides. Indirect costs are much higher—in total, the Mother Jones investigation calculated that the country pays about $169 billion for lost quality of life for gun victims, and $49 billion for lost wages. And the real total is likely even more. Medical costs, for example, are hard to fully account for, and are often astonishingly high, as one example in the story from an ER nurse demonstrates: One of her patients was shot as a teenager: "He was paralyzed from the neck down and could not feed himself, toilet himself, dress himself, or turn over in bed. He will live the rest of his life in a nursing home, all paid for by the taxpayers, as he is a Medicaid patient." She estimates that over the last two decades the price tag for this patient's skilled nursing care alone has been upwards of $1.7 million Mental health care after gun violence costs an estimated $410 million a year but would be higher if everyone who wanted or needed it could afford it. Then there are the costs of beefed-up security, as in Columbine, where the federal government spent at least $811 million to help schools pay for security guards. Ninety percent of American schools also spent money on security after Columbine; by 2017, schools may spend $5 billion a year on security.

m.fastcompany.com...



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 06:34 AM
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I really have nothing to contribute aside from my opinion regarding opinions.

Most everyone in america leads such a coddled and safe existence in their little artificial televised world of dreams and fantasies that any opinion expressed by them really should not amount to anything of relevance.

Nearly all of the information most of you use to formulate those opinions which mean nothing to anyone but yourselves is presented to you by a giant propaganda generating machine to steer your stupid public opinion regarding things you have no real life experience or clue about, in order to sell you some new garbage to make you feel more secure in you scaredy cat world or farm out your rights to a private company to make you feel more safe and warm and fuzzy in your toxin filled, over financed Mc Mansion.

I tire of hearing the opinions of people who have next to nothing regarding real life experience regarding all of stupid garbage they spew as their precious opinion.

Your opinion should not infringe or take away my rights any more than your rights should be infringed upon because of something I did or said.
edit on 4-12-2015 by MyHappyDogShiner because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 10:15 AM
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So although it only seems to matter if it's in the USA, 16 people were killed and several others injured early today in Cairo, Egypt when a couple of guys firebombed a nightclub. No guns involved. If there's a sociopathic will there is a way.



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