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What is "Black Diamond:" LRS-B Protest Gives an Intriguing Hint at Something

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posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 06:37 PM
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This brief review of the past performance and core competencies of the Boeing-Lockheed team suggests that the Air Force selection process for LRS-B—employing multiple reviews and several independent cost estimates—rather than being “fundamentally flawed” was sound and thorough. Boeing complaints that the Air Force unfairly penalized their bid on cost contradict reality. The KC-46 and 787 development programs priced out at double what Boeing originally estimated, experiencing costly delays owing to technical challenges and mismanagement. And Boeing proposals to wave away these unfavorable historical cost data with reference to a mysterious and untested “Black Diamond” manufacturing concept are unlikely to be convincing. In such competitions, the Air Force must rely on demonstrated competencies and past performance, not on unproven theories. As Secretary James noted, the independent cost estimators evaluating the LRS-B bids “do have this pesky thing called data and facts on their side more often than not.”


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So. What's Black Diamond?




posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 06:37 PM
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a reply to: anzha

Something that we won't see for several years.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 06:42 PM
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Sounds like a "flowcharted" process..

Something akin to "And then a miracle happens" followed by "Profit!"



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 06:44 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Its being touted as a manufacturing process.

Its not what we normally hear about.

Yes, I'd like a new spiffy aircraft, but something atypical is extra interesting.

I'm really intrigued.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 06:51 PM
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a reply to: anzha

It is from what I understand. It reduces costs quite a bit they say. Faster production with composites too.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 06:52 PM
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a reply to: anzha

The BDM company?

Who Is Black Diamond Manufacturing?

We are a specialty contract manufacturer that works with other industrial companies to build mechanical sub-assemblies, manufacture specialty parts, and provide supply chain management to lower overall production costs.


blackdiamondmfg.com...

Seems like a company that could make parts, tools and other things for highly classified projects and not know what the end result would be.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 08:11 PM
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a reply to: anzha

Not sure if it is a process as much as it is Boeing's advanced manufacturing facility in St. Louis.

breakingdefense.com...

The one that Carter visited some time ago.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 09:39 PM
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a reply to: anzha

There has got to have been and continuing a lot of razzle-dazzle with the books, rules and procedures from all quarters for decades to get the black triangles funded and operational.



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 06:29 AM
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Why don't use it for the KC-46 ? boeing protet for LRS-B but unable to deliver the tanker in time and budget , laughing.



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 11:54 AM
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a reply to: darksidius

Probably because its likely to be completely irrelevant to the manufacturing of the KC-46.

You would need a complete redesign to accommodate the process and whatever costs saved would be, well, lost to say the least.



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 12:16 PM
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a reply to: anzha

Eh what's another full certification program between friends. Think of how long a composite 767 could last. The AF could go 100 years this time before replacing a tanker.



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 12:18 PM
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a reply to: anzha

Boeing had to put a lot of R&D capital into making their own composite structures for the 787 program. They had a hell of a time getting suppliers to make quality composites to their specs. and actually had to buy out one of their suppliers to get back on track in that program. I think this Black Diamond facility is a direct shoot off of what ever process they came up with during the 787 program that allows them to efficiently make quality composite structures in a short amount of time.
Boeing was probably hoping that the bomber decision would in part take that into account since they are already probably able to make 787 components at a production level using this method. But as we're all aware, the decision was in part based off of past performance and not current or future manufacturing capabilities.



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 12:20 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Ooooh, a carbon composite tanker. Now that's sexy right there and would fit nicely right next to the 787 line in Everett.



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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My guess is that this is a form of 3D printing on a massive scale.. But, really, who knows?..



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 12:51 PM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

Yeah, and think of the nightmares in development to rival the 787.



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 12:58 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

That's why I think they lost the LRS-B. The air force looked at the 787 and the tech for the proposal, then flinched. Looks awesome, but if things go wrong, they're seriously up buried in financial...doodie.



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 01:11 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Eh, what's a couple billion dollars between friends.



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 01:31 PM
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a reply to: anzha

Both designs are heavy in composites. Personally I'd want the experience with large designs using them.



posted on Dec, 7 2015 @ 06:31 PM
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a reply to: clay2 baraka

I was told, a few months back, that Boeing St. Louis thinks they probably have the world's largest 3D print shop. Not sure what the measurement is on something like that, probably just sheer amount of printers. I'll have to look into the size and equipment count of some public print shops.




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