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Boeing completes 787 fatigue testing

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posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 12:18 PM
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Boeing has begun analyzing 5 years of fatigue on a static 787 airframe. The tests began in September of 2010, on ZY998, the third 787. The aircraft had the engines removed and was placed into a test rig that simulated 160,000 cycles, or 3.6 times the planned life cycle of a 787. The tests were delayed from 2009, after they had to reinforce the side of body join to the center wing box.

Previous tests pushed airframes to 100,000 flights on the 757 and 767, and 120,000 flights on the 777. Boeing is using the test to validate maintenance and inspection intervals. The first is scheduled at 6 years, and is an external visual inspection. Then at 12 years is the first internal heavy check. Compared to the 767, the 787 is expected to have 60% less maintenance required over the life of the aircraft.


LOS ANGELES—Boeing has completed a five-year fatigue test of the 787 airframe, validating the basic strength of the predominantly composite primary structure and helping to define maintenance and inspections to cover the aircraft’s full projected-service lifetime.

The tests, which began in September 2010 on ZY998, the third 787 airframe built, simulated entire flights, from taxi through ascent, cruise and descent back to taxi and were aimed at creating a data set for the airframe’s durability. The tests subjected the structure to loads which simulated more than 160,000 cycles, or more than 3.6 times the design life of 44,000 flight cycles. “Test results were right in line with our expectations, with no significant findings,” says Bob Whittington, Boeing 787 vice president and chief project engineer. “We validated the robustness of the 787 design as well as our modeling, and the airplane performed so well that we extended the testing.”

aviationweek.com...




posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 12:58 PM
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In 1989 I was at the Boeing plant in Everett installing galleys in 747-400's. One of the engineers that I knew told me to come with him if I wanted to see something cool. They were stress testing the wing of the 747-400 and on the final cycle they were testing to failure. When we got there they had the wing ends flexed so far up that it looked like a skateboard half-pipe. You could hear some loud snaps (rivets failing) and then KABOOM!!! the wing came apart. One of the loudest noises that I ever heard. The engineer was right it was one of the coolest things I ever saw.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 01:00 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

We were looking for that rig when we did the factory tour last week. We really want to see that one day.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 01:51 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
1) Do you trust Boeing and
2) Would you personally fly on this plane?

I've got serious reservations about the 787.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 02:00 PM
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a reply to: TonyS

I'd be on one in a heartbeat if I had the chance. There is one flying that has flown for a year and a half, and has had one mechanically related delay in that time. The worldwide dispatch rate is almost 99%. I have no reservations about this aircraft, any more than I do about any other aircraft.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: JIMC5499

I could hear when they did that type of testing on later model triple 7's from a couple miles away where I lived. I would have loved to see that in person.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 02:53 PM
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originally posted by: TonyS
I've got serious reservations about the 787.


If the 787 is unfit to fly on then you should probably just stay away from airplanes in general because they won't be better in the safety department. We learn as we go on, and stuff gets better. If an aircraft had serious issues the airlines would know long before you do.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 04:57 PM
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a reply to: sg1642

Yeah, I love that video. It's so much more maneuverable than people think.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 05:05 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: sg1642

Yeah, I love that video. It's so much more maneuverable than people think.


Thing looks like it should drop out the sky during some of those turns. Just seems to leap back off the ground.



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