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Scientists Get First Glimpse Of Black Hole Eating Star

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posted on Nov, 29 2015 @ 04:31 PM
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(Artist's Impression)

Another first in space exploration!
Astrophysicists witness for the first time a star being swallowed by a black hole and ejecting a near-light speed flare!



An international team of astrophysicists led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist has for the first time witnessed a star being swallowed by a black hole and ejecting a flare of matter moving at nearly the speed of light.

The finding reported in the journal Science tracks the star -- about the size of our sun -- as it shifts from its customary path, slips into the gravitational pull of a supermassive black hole and is sucked in, said Sjoert van Velzen, a Hubble fellow at Johns Hopkins.

"These events are extremely rare," van Velzen said. "It's the first time we see everything from the stellar destruction followed by the launch of a conical outflow, also called a jet, and we watched it unfold over several months."
Science Daily Link

Amazing that we can see these things in action, though only via radio signal/orbit representation...for now!
Here's the orbit of our own little cosmic buddy, 4.5 million times the mass of the Sun:


What did I tell ya? Space gets cooler every day!


Last month we reported on the first observation of a quiet SMBH flaring up after it ate a star, and now a team of astronomers from Johns Hopkins University were able to follow the evolution of that event in greater detail. The new research confirmed the previous study and expanded on how common tidal disruption flares are. These are expected to happen every time a star gets too close to a black hole and is ripped to shreds by its gravity.

The event, called ASASSN-14li, was followed up by different telescopes trying to characterize how tidal disruption flares are caused by black holes tearing stars apart. The stellar material is eaten by the black hole, which then emits jets. According to the study, published in Science, jets due to tidal disruption flares should be emitted by both supermassive and stellar-sized black holes, and the reason why we haven’t detected them in the black holes in our galaxy is only due to the lack of sensitivity of our instruments.
IFL Science Link

Stay astonished!

A&E
edit on 29-11-2015 by ADAMandEVIL because: Grammar/Typo

edit on 29-11-2015 by ADAMandEVIL because: structure fix




posted on Nov, 29 2015 @ 06:49 PM
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a reply to: ADAMandEVIL

Stunning stuff, and thank you for the grab! F&S
Always more than a little intrigued by the true monster
holes: almost like Helen Hunt does huge tornadoes.

Funny first impression.. somebody in gold lingerie getting
coathangered low with the TV stand-- and putting some
scalp on the coffee table. This is gonna leave a mark.
On the other hand maybe I should log off for awhile...



posted on Nov, 29 2015 @ 06:50 PM
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a reply to: ADAMandEVIL

Very very cool - thanks for sharing OP *burp



posted on Nov, 29 2015 @ 10:22 PM
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a reply to: ADAMandEVIL

A matter of months? All I can remember about black holes is that when something is caught up in the event horizon it takes like, forever, for it to be swallowed, not a couple of months. I must be missing something here.



posted on Nov, 30 2015 @ 03:12 AM
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a reply to: TerryMcGuire
That sounds correct. Something falling into a black hole would take an infinite amount of time. We should forever see the image.
How then does that work for consuming stars? Shouldn’t black holes be forever glowing with all the energy it has consumed from stars throughout its lifetime?



posted on Nov, 30 2015 @ 04:11 AM
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originally posted by: TerryMcGuire
a reply to: ADAMandEVIL

A matter of months? All I can remember about black holes is that when something is caught up in the event horizon it takes like, forever, for it to be swallowed, not a couple of months. I must be missing something here.



Well if its ejecting matter then i guess that trumps hawkings theory that energy and mater are lost in black holes ... Oh wait lennard suskind already refuted that .

Lol


I am a bit confused as well .

Curious to see what physicist have to say about this.



posted on Nov, 30 2015 @ 05:47 AM
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Good day, gentlemen, your resident physicist here, arriving at this precise point in time and space precisely to address the confusion regarding gravitational time dilation.

*lowers his glasses over his nose*

Ahem, now, where were we? Ah, the question of stuff falling into a black hole seeming to get frozen it time. Here are some points on the subject:

1. The freezing in time only happens from the point of view of an external observer; the falling object's own time flow is not changed.

2. This apparent freezing of time happens as the object is about to reach the event horizon. Before it does that, we can still observe the object being torn apart by the black hole's gravity, emitting all that radiation and chucking stuff around.

Hopefully that clears it up.



posted on Nov, 30 2015 @ 01:41 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace
Good day, gentlemen, your resident physicist here...
Good morning to you too. Perhaps you could help me with a couple questions. I find black holes to be very curious and over the years they also seem to have become more complicated.


2. This apparent freezing of time happens as the object is about to reach the event horizon. Before it does that, we can still observe the object being torn apart by the black hole's gravity, emitting all that radiation and chucking stuff around.
So when stuff falls into the event horizon of a black hole its image, or energy, is frozen in time from our perspective? If this is true then wouldn't that make black holes easy to locate? After all they should be extremely radiant emanating all that frozen energy from its event horizon.

I am also curious how they can emit these huge jets. I understand it's said to be pre-event horizon stuff yet how does it go from an equatorial to polar ejection. I would think that the greatest centrifugal force would be at the equator.
edit on 11/30/2015 by Devino because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 30 2015 @ 01:50 PM
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Would anyone be willing to see if a black hole teleports you to an alternate reality, or forward/back through time? I would if we had a machine that could get us to a black hole.



posted on Nov, 30 2015 @ 02:35 PM
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originally posted by: LSU0408
Would anyone be willing to see if a black hole teleports you to an alternate reality, or forward/back through time?
I think it just teleports you back to the time when you first asked this question minus your memory of the event. I think I might have tried it...I don't know, I can't remember.



posted on Nov, 30 2015 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

And good day to you kinds sir. Yes, now I can recall. The word swallow tossed me off. That set up visions of, you know, being 'in' the BH, already in the Event Horizon and disappearing down it's gullet. So as I understand it the 'swallowing process, as seen from our 'outside' perspective will go on indefinitely, that this one event itself will be around a long long time for us to study. Not that the two months of study are now over because the tasty bit has been consumed.



posted on Nov, 30 2015 @ 05:33 PM
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originally posted by: Devino

originally posted by: wildespace
Good day, gentlemen, your resident physicist here...
So when stuff falls into the event horizon of a black hole its image, or energy, is frozen in time from our perspective? If this is true then wouldn't that make black holes easy to locate? After all they should be extremely radiant emanating all that frozen energy from its event horizon.

The image and the energy emanating from the in-falling object will gradually get redshifted into longer and longer wavelengths, effectively disappearing from the view altogether. This is because the EM radiation (including visible light) gets "stretched out" by the incresing time dilation as the object approaches the horizon.


I am also curious how they can emit these huge jets. I understand it's said to be pre-event horizon stuff yet how does it go from an equatorial to polar ejection. I would think that the greatest centrifugal force would be at the equator.

The polar jets are still something of a mystery, but some theories are explained here.



posted on Dec, 1 2015 @ 03:32 PM
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a reply to: wildespace
Thank you for your reply wildespace. A friend and I were talking about jets and I wasn’t too excited about his explanation as to their nature. After reading that Wiki page, and other sources, I think he may have done a better job though, LOL.
All that I got from reading those web pages so far are many more questions.
What’s the difference between an astrophysical jet and gamma ray burst?
Are jets associated with radio/x-ray loud sources similar to GRB and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN)
Are jets accelerating particles?
Is there a flow of charged particles, magnetic fields, synchrotron radiation?
Is the accelerating of particles the cause of these observed radio, x-ray and gamma rays?
So many questions and so little time to spend researching.



posted on Dec, 1 2015 @ 05:21 PM
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There's a nice artist's impression and an enhanced video of stars getting bounced around a black hole, but what about an actual photo of the ejecti? That video of stars reminds me of watching tadpoles in swamp water or some other liquid nature video.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 03:42 AM
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originally posted by: SurfinUSA
There's a nice artist's impression and an enhanced video of stars getting bounced around a black hole, but what about an actual photo of the ejecti? That video of stars reminds me of watching tadpoles in swamp water or some other liquid nature video.

I assume the actual photos (or it might have been other kinds of measurement) are in the original paper published in the Science journal. Unfortunately, you need to be a registered member there, and probably pay to access the paper itself too. www.sciencemag.org...

There is some stuff like measurements and graphs in "Supplementary Material" available here: www.sciencemag.org... but I'm not sure that's what you're looking for.
edit on 2-12-2015 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

Thank you for the links.



posted on Dec, 2 2015 @ 02:11 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace
I assume the actual photos (or it might have been other kinds of measurement) are in the original paper published in the Science journal.
Here is the only optical image I could find, the galaxy in question is the yellow blob in the middle. I would like to see some x-ray images.

The evidence found can be viewed here, it's not very exciting, Nature. See figures near bottom of link.
And a link to another article from Sci-News.

They are calling this a Tidal Disruption Event.
This is different from Gamma Ray Bursts which are both different from astrophysical jets.



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 04:53 AM
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I love how the event was called ASASSN-14li. The black hole was the "assasin".

From the X-ray Chandra observatory, there wasn't an image but a spectrum measurement, shown and talked about here: chandra.si.edu...

Since this small galaxy is so far away, all they can really do is look at this small blob of light and measure its emissions across the EM spectrum, trying to deduce what's happening.



posted on Dec, 3 2015 @ 01:57 PM
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a reply to: wildespace
I tend to get a little skeptical when I read that these X-ray emissions are being referred to as a “wind”. I suppose they mean something like our Sun’s solar wind, i.e. electric current sheets of accelerating charged particles. I think that a "wind" is quite different than a stream of electrically charged particles accelerating causing X-rays.

Here is another source that tries to explain this further.
Tidal Disruption of a Star By a Massive Black Hole




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