It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Rapid plankton growth in ocean seen as sign of carbon dioxide loading

page: 1
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 10:10 AM
link   
There's an explosion of macroscopic marine algae in the N. Atlantic and scientists are scrambling to find out why. "This swift suggests environmental change as a result of increased carbon dioxide in the ocean, a study led a by Johns Hopkins University scientist has found." A swift environmental change? Interesting..........



A microscopic marine alga is thriving in the North Atlantic to an extent that defies scientific predictions, suggesting swift environmental change as a result of increased carbon dioxide in the ocean, a study led a by Johns Hopkins University scientist has found.

What these findings mean remains to be seen, however, as does whether the rapid growth in the tiny plankton's population is good or bad news for the planet.

Published Thursday in the journal Science, the study details a tenfold increase in the abundance of single-cell coccolithophores between 1965 and 2010, and a particularly sharp spike since the late 1990s in the population of these pale-shelled floating phytoplankton.

"Something strange is happening here, and it's happening much more quickly than we thought it should," said Anand Gnanadesikan, associate professor in the Morton K. Blaustein Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Johns Hopkins and one of the study's five authors.

Gnanadesikan said the Science report certainly is good news for creatures that eat coccolithophores, but it's not clear what those are. "What is worrisome," he said, "is that our result points out how little we know about how complex ecosystems function." The result highlights the possibility of rapid ecosystem change, suggesting that prevalent models of how these systems respond to climate change may be too conservative, he said.


This is interesting. Rapid plankton growth due to increasing carbon dioxide in the ocean. What's going on in the water(s)? I think we need to better survey our oceans to get an idea of what's really happening and how soon....What says ATS?

www.biologynews.net...




posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 10:25 AM
link   
It's frightening. .. some of our lakes have seen a simaler 'green-blue' algie I. The past few years. It is deadly and unlike the ocean seems to stay around much too long... good find OP.





posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 10:25 AM
link   
a reply to: lostbook
It shows that our bio-sphere is in a constant state of flux.

From your source article:

In vast numbers and over eons, coccolithophores have left their mark on the planet, helping to show significant environmental shifts. The White Cliffs of Dover are white because of massive deposits of coccolithophores. But closer examination shows the white deposits interrupted by slender, dark bands of flint, a product of organisms that have glassy shells made of silicon, Gnanadesikan said. "These clearly represent major shifts in ecosystem type," Gnanadesikan said.
"But unless we understand what drives coccolithophore abundance, we can't understand what is driving such shifts. Is it carbon dioxide?"



posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 11:41 AM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

One good thing is that plankton sequesters carbon.



posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 11:44 AM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

We have the technology to super heat the ionosphere... do we also have the tech to super heat spots ON earth?



posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 12:20 PM
link   
This cannot possibly be a bad thing right? It just means an abundant source of food for baleen whales and other filter feeders. Isnt that good news for the oceans marine life?? I am confused



posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 12:28 PM
link   

originally posted by: lostbook
respond to climate change may be too conservative, ...




www.biologynews.net...

Can hardly wait for the frivolous carbon tax.
Weather manipulation, geoengineering (California Drought, Shasta), Fukushima, HAARP, to name a few..have poisoned and choked our environment to the point that autism and heart failure is exponentially rising as well as other diseases and cancers. It won't be long before we unite in lamentation over our complacency as our leaders and rulers destroy our world and poison us into oblivion. ELE on many fronts.



posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 04:59 PM
link   
why would they assume that Rapid plankton growth is due to increasing carbon dioxide?
It`s just a likely that there might be fewer sea creatures left that eat plankton.



posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 05:11 PM
link   
a reply to: imd12c4funn

Didnt take long for some rabble rouser to mention carbon taxes....

Hopefully phytoplankton growth will help, but doubtful. The amount of co2 we pump in the atmosphere is mind boggling.



posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 06:07 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

I'd say mother earth is desperately seeking CO2 sinks and algae would fit the bill.

As a system the earth will correct in any way needed without regard for any single segment of the system (read humans) to regain homeostasis.

The average planetary COs levels are nearing 400 ppm - that's the average over the entire planet. In cities it is already above that threshold regularly and in buildings higher even yet.

These levels impair thinking and decision making:

scitechdaily.com...


On nine scales of decision-making performance, test subjects showed significant reductions on six of the scales at CO2 levels of 1,000 parts per million (ppm) and large reductions on seven of the scales at 2,500 ppm. The most dramatic declines in performance, in which subjects were rated as “dysfunctional,” were for taking initiative and thinking strategically. “Previous studies have looked at 10,000 ppm, 20,000 ppm; that’s the level at which scientists thought effects started,” said Berkeley Lab scientist Mark Mendell, also a co-author of the study. “That’s why these findings are so startling.”


While this reprint and the original paper are mostly talking about indoor air - ask yourself - how much time do you spend indoors, your children.

With outdoor air increasing in CO2 and declining in O2, the city measures will be worse and even more so the indoor air quality

Lots of O2 producing house plants will help...



posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 06:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: Tardacus
why would they assume that Rapid plankton growth is due to increasing carbon dioxide?
It`s just a likely that there might be fewer sea creatures left that eat plankton.


Because = basic biology - school - remember - plants consume CO2 and exhale (not the right work) Oxygen.



posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 07:04 PM
link   

originally posted by: FyreByrd

originally posted by: Tardacus
why would they assume that Rapid plankton growth is due to increasing carbon dioxide?
It`s just a likely that there might be fewer sea creatures left that eat plankton.


Because = basic biology - school - remember - plants consume CO2 and exhale (not the right work) Oxygen.

Transpire is The word you are looking for, I believe.



posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 07:35 PM
link   
If only we were not killing so much marine life, there might be more that could eat this plankton.



posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 07:36 PM
link   

originally posted by: Tardacus
why would they assume that Rapid plankton growth is due to increasing carbon dioxide?
It`s just a likely that there might be fewer sea creatures left that eat plankton.

Because that would lead to a gradual increase, not a rapid explosion like we are seeing.



posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 08:33 PM
link   

originally posted by: AmericanRealist
This cannot possibly be a bad thing right? It just means an abundant source of food for baleen whales and other filter feeders. Isnt that good news for the oceans marine life?? I am confused


Not all life will benefit, only those who are adapted for such changes.



posted on Nov, 28 2015 @ 08:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: AmericanRealist
This cannot possibly be a bad thing right? It just means an abundant source of food for baleen whales and other filter feeders. Isnt that good news for the oceans marine life?? I am confused

Except they could be toxic to other life. So it could be good for some, bad for others. Plankton is also a general term for any small life like this, so there's not enough information to decide it's good.



posted on Nov, 29 2015 @ 01:04 AM
link   

originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: FyreByrd

originally posted by: Tardacus
why would they assume that Rapid plankton growth is due to increasing carbon dioxide?
It`s just a likely that there might be fewer sea creatures left that eat plankton.


Because = basic biology - school - remember - plants consume CO2 and exhale (not the right work) Oxygen.

Transpire is The word you are looking for, I believe.


Thank you!!!



posted on Nov, 29 2015 @ 01:58 AM
link   
Again I'm always fascinated by Earths ability to self regulate itself ala that Gaia hypothesis. Haven't researched the article, to me it seems weird only one area of the ocean would have more CO2 causing the plankton bloom. I would have thought of it being everywhere in the world's oceans.



posted on Nov, 29 2015 @ 03:12 AM
link   

originally posted by: pavil
Again I'm always fascinated by Earths ability to self regulate itself ala that Gaia hypothesis. Haven't researched the article, to me it seems weird only one area of the ocean would have more CO2 causing the plankton bloom. I would have thought of it being everywhere in the world's oceans.


Why would it be everywhere if it was from something such as underwater vents?



posted on Nov, 29 2015 @ 03:31 AM
link   
This phenomena could possibly be explained due to the mid Atlantic ridge being in a high carbon flux stage. Erupting basalts are notoriously high in C02 content at the mid oceanic ridges, and especially in the North Atlantic- right where they are noticing this increase. Just a thought.




top topics



 
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join