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Tips on tiling around toilet?

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posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 09:04 PM
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I googled it and even watched some videos. I've had some good luck just asking on ATS and other random places though.

I settled on some vinyl "self adhesive" (lies) wood stuff, and am precutting everything before I lay it down. Actually rather impressed with it, looks very authentic and is essentially zero maintenance. Any tips on going around the toilet? The toilet is new, looks good, and I'd rather not pull it if there's a relatively simple solution. This stuff cuts super easy with a knife, I'm just having a little trouble figuring out the easiest way to mock up a template. I'm pretty lucky in that this thing's base is one of the most squared off I've ever seen, the only slight issue being the corners at the front edge are rounded.

Measure it, trace the measurements on some cardboard and slowly cut out the corners to shape until it fits? I feel like there has to be a quicker solution that I'm just not seeing. They're essentially rounded off 90 degree angles. It doesn't have to be entirely perfect since I'm going to be sealing it, but I want to get it close.

Writing this gave me an idea, perhaps if I get something that's close to the same thickness I could just trace the corner part and transcribe that.

Anyone in WA want some beer and know what they're doing?




posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 09:10 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

Pull the toilet. If you don't, water can get in around the edge if the toilet sweats or you get water on the floor after showering. It's a little extra work, but you'll thank yourself for it. If I do flooring, I pull base boards, toilet, sink pedestals, door facings, etc...anything that stops me going wall to wall.



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 09:11 PM
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Step 1) Remove toilet
Step 2) Tile
Step 3) Replace toilet
Step 4) Do the moonwalk in your living-room. Sha' 'mon!



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 09:22 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

Tiling around a toilet is never a good idea. It is cheaper and easier now, but even when you google the idea they recommend you just remove the toilet.

search result
edit on 26-11-2015 by intrptr because: link



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 09:24 PM
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Yep, what they said.

You want the flooring to be under the toilet base so that any condensation, pee, whatever, spreads out onto the floor rather than gathering all inside the teeny tiny gap around the base. You'll just end up having those edges lifting up over time... causing you to have to replace them again and again.

No matter how tight and perfect you make those cuts, water will find its way in there slowly causing damage over time.



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 09:51 PM
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Step 1) Remove toilet Step 2) Tile Step 3) Replace toilet Step 4) Do the moonwalk in your living-room. Sha' 'mon!
a reply to: socketdude

Sorry but there's a step 2.5) replace wax seal, do not reuse old one. Thanks.



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 09:53 PM
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I just did that last week and I have to agree that it`s soooo much easier to do it if you pull the toilet.
if you pull the toilet you don`t have to be very accurate with you cuts because the toilet will cover the cut edges of the tiles.you can be off by 1-2 inches with your cuts and toilet will still cover the edges of the tiles.a wax ring is only about a dollar,it`s worth a dollar to save you all the time and aggravation of trying to cut the tiles to fit perfectly around the toilet.
edit on 26-11-2015 by Tardacus because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 09:55 PM
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I was going to say pull the toilet, but after seeing that everyone else beat me to it, i won't.


reply to: Domo1



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 10:03 PM
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OK fine, I'll pull the stupid toilet!

Deep down, I knew this was the right answer, I just didn't want to admit it on account of being scared of wax rings.

Toilets frighten me. About the only home repair thing that gives me pause, we don't all have two bathrooms (I miss having two bathrooms)! I was also frightened when I replaced the stove top, but that isn't something I use 10 times a day. I can't call the local pizza place and have them bring me something appropriate to poop in. Can I? Oh hey, the box! It's gonna be fine!

Love you guys and gals.

One of these days I want to do a before and after of this house. I'm actually rather proud of what I've done with the place, it was incredibly dated, and now it's actually rather charming. There's no longer any cedar paneling in fun geometric patterns, but it's still got personality. It's weird to think about it like this, but I feel like the house was depressed for a long time and snapped out of it with some new duds!



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 10:07 PM
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I guess I'll bring up something no one has touched on.

Sure, remove the toilet.

But!

MAKE SURE NO ONE IS USING IT WHEN YOU DO!



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

Bah, nothing to fear.

Pulling a toilet takes all of about 15 minutes, seriously. And if the toilet is new like you say, it'll come up that much easier because there won't be any rust build up around the bolts and the wax seal shouldn't be all melty and goopy either (messy cleanup otherwise).

Home renos are always a fun adventure.

Can't wait to see your before and after pics !




posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 10:14 PM
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Glad to see you're "pulling it". That's certainly the best choice. The one time you don't, that's just when six months later your toilet takes a crap of it's own, and you won't find another the exact same shape!

The water issues are important as well, just thought I'd add to list of reasons

Also, be sure after flooring is laid to measure from top of flooring to base of sealing ring surface, the wax rings only work for so much distance ( I forget the spec) if it's more than that you need eithe two seals or one of those green extended size ones.

Google it


edit on 11 26 2015 by caterpillage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 11:07 PM
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originally posted by: donktheclown



Step 1) Remove toilet Step 2) Tile Step 3) Replace toilet Step 4) Do the moonwalk in your living-room. Sha' 'mon!
a reply to: socketdude

Sorry but there's a step 2.5) replace wax seal, do not reuse old one. Thanks.

You either sell the wax seals or don't know how to properly remove a toilet!



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 11:12 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

A way to avoid removing the toilet is to make a clay or putty outline of the toilet base, let harden, cut on opposite sides, remove and reset for a mold of the base.

But really, just remove the toilet :p



posted on Nov, 27 2015 @ 12:23 AM
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Lucky Larry $ilverstein agrees...

Pull it!

Something else to consider as well:


Toilets should be caulked to the floor to prevent side-to-side movement that can break the wax seal (and to prevent splashes or overflows from puddling under the toilet and rotting the floor). DIYers often set the toilet and then apply a tiny bead of caulk along the outside edge. That doesn't always provide a good enough bond to the floor, and it leaves a prominent caulk line. There's an easier way to secure the toilet and provide a cleaner caulk line. Just follow this tip from master plumber Les Zell.

First set the toilet in place (without the wax ring) and square it up to the wall. Then make an outline of the toilet on the floor with masking tape. Remove the toilet and turn it on its side. Measure the depth and width of the gluing edge of the bowl. Next, move your caulk gun to the inset depth you just measured and apply caulk directly to the floor, maintaining the inset depth as you follow the tape. Install the wax ring and lower the toilet onto the flange. Stand on the toilet to compress the wax ring and ensure good contact with the caulk. Then use paper towels to clean up any caulk that oozed out.

How to Caulk a Toilet to a Floor


How to Caulk a Toilet to a Floor - Google Search



posted on Nov, 27 2015 @ 03:08 AM
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a reply to: Domo1

I aint no tiler but if I was doing it I would used some kind straight edge such as a piece of straight wood or metal to get the tiles lined up before grouting them.

The tiles in my place are absolutely perfect and they were done a herring bone style as well. Im sure they used a straight edge.



posted on Nov, 27 2015 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

The way I do it:

- lay the tile down to get a rough idea where you are going to need to make the cut. You can even go ahead and do a rough trim with your utility knife at this point
- now that you have a rough trim, you can use your utility knife to do a fine trim. You just press the vinyl into the corner thats needing to be trimmed, and slide the blade along where the crease it
- since its around the toilet, id use a few dabs of Liquid Nails on the back of the tile once you expose the adhesive. This will help keep the cleaning solutions and any errant uric acid from degrading the adhesive that is already on the tile, making it slip (which can make you fall in a most tragic manner)
- CAULK IN AROUND THE TOILET WHEN DONE. This will keep moisture from leaking up under the edge of your newly installed tiles, and will greatly increase longevity and hygiene.

My thoughts on the above: if you make a bad cut, you probably will have several laminates left over anyway. ETA: also, the bonus of using caulk...it'll cover over any minor imperfections in your tile trimming, closing that 1/8" gap you are bound to leave in some places.
edit on 11/27/2015 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2015 @ 01:33 PM
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originally posted by: Azureblue
a reply to: Domo1

I aint no tiler but if I was doing it I would used some kind straight edge such as a piece of straight wood or metal to get the tiles lined up before grouting them.

The tiles in my place are absolutely perfect and they were done a herring bone style as well. Im sure they used a straight edge.


He's using vinyl (aka, "Peel n Stick"). No grout needed.

But if you were doing ceramic or stone tile, you'd use spacers to get things lined up straight. They are little crosses made of plastic that you can use to get a perfectly uniform fit.



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