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Penmanship.

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CX
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posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 04:22 PM
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As a fan of beautiful handwriting, i love anything to do with good penmanship. I'm working my way through the Spencerian script method of handwriting at the moment, the style used extensively in the US from about 1850 - 1925....you know that lovely flowing writing that was taught in schools and for business writing.

So i wanted to share a couple of videos by a super talented guy called Jake Weidmann, one of only twelve master penman in the world.

Totaly fascinating to see such patience, skill and artistic talent.



For those that are interested, here is a great talk from Jake at the TED talks...



CX
edit on 26/11/15 by CX because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 04:40 PM
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a reply to: CX
That was cool. Thanks for posting it. Thanks to a lot of schools deciding not to teach cursive I think penmanship will eventually be a dying or lost art. Sad.
I used to have good handwriting until I injured my shoulders and did nerve damage to my hands. Now, all I can manage is a scrawl. I wasn't anywhere near as neat as the guy in your first video, though. That was amazing penmanship.



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 04:44 PM
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a reply to: CX

S+F


That was a great video, thanks for sharing.

I don't display the best handwriting, but surprisingly if I just slow down a little, the difference in neatness and expression in quite staggering. Imagine if people took the time to slowdown everything they do?

edit on 26-11-2015 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: CX

I'm a typographer by trade and hobby, though I do not have the lettering skills as this guy. Amazing.

I was lucky enough to be trained under Doyald Young who had the same attention to detail, though he focused on more conservative techniques and applications instead of script work and calligraphy. This video of him is very interesting if you love a different sort of penmanship.


edit on 26-11-2015 by LesMisanthrope because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 06:00 PM
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the way i write, i only had 2 choices in life: serial killer or doctor.

i type really fast anyway, so just don't really write if i can avoid it (even printing out grocery lists from Word)



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: CX

Who would have thought that i would sit through two videos about penmanship . He mentioned chicken scratching , yes i too aspire to reach that level . S&F .



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 06:52 PM
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Absolutely love this!!!!! Sometimes I make my own cards and try to write fancy.



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 06:53 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
the way i write, i only had 2 choices in life: serial killer or doctor.

i type really fast anyway, so just don't really write if i can avoid it (even printing out grocery lists from Word)


Hahahahah! Serial killer or Doctor! That cracked me up!



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 07:06 PM
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a reply to: CX

That was awesome in the truest, and most glorious sense of the word.

I am in total dumbfounded shock, at the sheer control and dexterity that Mr Weidmann clearly possesses. To train to that degree takes dedication and passion, and you can see it in his work, and hear it in his voice.



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 07:25 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

It's sad. Our son may be among the last generation to learn actual cursive. He's in a classical school, and they teach cursive right our of the box. So he already knows his first initial in cursive. If you squint ... it's there.




posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 07:54 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan


the way i write, i only had 2 choices in life: serial killer or doctor.

Snap, Crackle, Pop, and the Luck Charms guy ought to watch their backs then. Oh, you said serial killer. *Backs slowly away and wishes for a big stick*



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 08:44 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark




Thanks to a lot of schools deciding not to teach cursive I think penmanship will eventually be a dying or lost art.


What are your thoughts on this? I think it's sad too, but I have trouble actually explaining why. It makes way more sense to invest the time spent learning cursive to typing and other forms of computer literacy in this day and age, but there's something about it that just seems sad.

I was taught cursive, and am one of very people I know that actually uses it since for me it's quicker at times, I'm one of those weirdos that has five fairly different styles of handwriting on one page. It seems a bit superfluous, but sad that it's going away like recess and art/music.

P.S. For anyone into penmanship, there is a subreddit called /r/penmanshiporn (no actual porn) that's actually rather fun to have a quick look through. As I recall the sidebar has a lot of resources if you want to get into it.
edit on 2620151120151 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 09:04 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

The TED talk describes the virtues of being able to write cursive. It's the connections made in the brain.

I became interested in calligraphy before I could write in cursive. My parents were taught the simpler Palmer method in school but my mother learned Spencerian from her mother so she got me started. I was inspired by a lot of really old letters handed down in my family. They were so beautiful!
Yes, I'm one of those dinosaurs who still writes letters and cards to people. I'm also one of those people who will sit and write for hours on a yellow legal pad to clarify my thoughts on different issues. While I love my computer and word processing programs for everyday things, when I want something to be special, it is done by my hands.



posted on Nov, 26 2015 @ 09:12 PM
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OMG! How!?

I'm left handed, and my hand writing is atrocious.
I'm thinking people like me are wired differently because it doesn't matter how much time I take it still turns into something resembling a three year olds scribble. What is strange is I'm very good with hand tools. I can take a watch apart and put it back together, so I don't think its just about motor control, there's something else, and I just haven't got it.



posted on Nov, 27 2015 @ 12:23 AM
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a reply to: Domo1
I think it's sad that they're dropping it. It's a useful skill and looks good, at least I think it does. Besides, people act like the digital age is going to be around forever. What happens if the power grid goes poof or something like that and the electric dream fades away, dumping us back to where civilization was in the early 20th century when penmanship was more a part of every day life?



posted on Nov, 27 2015 @ 01:51 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Skid Mark

It's sad. Our son may be among the last generation to learn actual cursive. He's in a classical school, and they teach cursive right our of the box. So he already knows his first initial in cursive. If you squint ... it's there.



It's sad isn't it? Just as our paperback books are being replaced with electronic devices to read. Guess I'm old fashioned, but I'll take cursive writing and a real book anytime!



posted on Nov, 29 2015 @ 08:36 AM
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The ability to use calligraphy in writing is a romantic one. The days of Fountain pens and the no second chance disposition of writing with them included. Some calligraphy is so ornate it defies comprehension, or gives pause to the reader by virtue of being to difficult to discern, and those have perplexed myself at times........ even having practiced Calligraphy in school.

It seems just another daily routine thrown out with the bathwater.



posted on Nov, 29 2015 @ 08:40 AM
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Just a thought..... Books capture history.... Electronic devices do as well. But at the whim of the government, that history can be shut off or changed without the readers permission, let alone knowledge.


CX

posted on Nov, 29 2015 @ 09:30 AM
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Thanks for all the replies, it's nice to see there are people out there who are still passionate about handwriting.


It's so sad when I hear of schools dropping handwriting from the curriculum. My teacher gave us all a nice fountain pen when we got good at our writing, and a calligraphy pen too which I still use today.

I just NEED a nice writing desk, maybe an old roll top bureau like this.....i don't want for much




CX.

edit on 29/11/15 by CX because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 29 2015 @ 11:45 PM
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to paraphrase a comment from the first video

To write is to ingrain the words in your brain.

I still want to write with a pen and paper. Typing doesn't connect with my memory.

S and F




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