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The ignorance of some people is amazing!

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posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 08:24 PM
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Somebody I know was watching the Disney version of Cinderella and I happened to mention how different it is from the Grimm fairy tales version. She then proceeded to argue with me and say that you can't trust the Grimm version because it lies. I had to walk away. I mean, really? The older (and far as I know original) version lied and Disney got it right? Holy crap on a cracker people can be numb from the neck up. It reminds me of the time somebody was talking about Frankenstein's monster and kept calling it Frankenstein (something that bothers the hell out of me). I said that Frankenstein was the scientist and that the monster had no name. He then proceeds to tell me that it is, too, Frankenstein because all of the movies called it that. Never mind the book by Mary Shelley never giving the monster a name. That, or the Universal movie never having a name listed in the credits. Boris Karloff's role is listed as The Monster (the last I checked).
I swear, some people make me facepalm and shake my head. If you deny ignorance enough, I swear they'd disappear.




posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 08:36 PM
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Given the number and importance of things many people are ignorant about, these two examples seem pretty tame to me. You are correct, of course, but compared to people's ignorance about ISIS, Global Warming, science in general, evolution, politics, etc., your two examples are so inconsequential and trivial that they simply don't warrant much attention.



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 08:38 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

Skid, ignorance is not amazing, what would be amazing is if there wasn't any!



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 08:40 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

This is what happens when we lose our legacy and cultural heritage. No one learns the roots of where our stories come from. We can't study them because they were written by old, dead, white guys ... no diversity in the canon.



So too many people do think that Disney wrote Snow White and Sleeping Beauty and others like them.



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 08:41 PM
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a reply to: schuyler
Well, I don't even bother to talk about things like that to most people I know. All I get is a blank stare. Somebody I know actually said that if they banned NASCAR, he'd riot. Never mind the things you mentioned or anything else that's wrong with the world. NASCAR. Yep, scary.



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 08:42 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko
True. Far too few people can be bothered to crack open a book these days either. Sad.



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 08:44 PM
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Here is a good read on the Brothers Grimm, if someone isn't familiar. It's interesting because they originally started out as Folklorists, and their books garnered little interest. It wasn't until later they saw the markability in sanitized versions, and the Grimm Tales compilations most people are familiar with are those. Basically, the original, originals were even worse than the Disney versions, which were sanitized versions of the Grimm's sanitized versions.

Double sanitization.



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 08:50 PM
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a reply to: boncho

I have the Barnes & Noble compilations of both Grimms and Arabian Nights ... talk about bare bones and dry, but they aren't nice, either.

However, the world wasn't nice either.



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 09:04 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

Well let's face it... Grimm fairy tales are, well, pretty grim.

Can't say that I blame Disney for fluffing up a lot of the original stories, lest we have kiddies all over the world waking up in the middle of the night screaming in terror of everything that goes bump in the dark from mom and dad's bedtime stories.

It seems the Brothers Grimm preferred to use fear as a means of teaching life lessons to the wee folk back in the day.


Actually, many of these "fairy tales" weren't originally meant for wee folks' ears:


Sleeping Beauty

In one of the very earliest versions of this classic story, published in 1634 by Giambattista Basile as Sun, Moon, and Talia, the princess does not prick her finger on a spindle, but rather gets a sliver of flax stuck under her fingernail. She falls down, apparently dead, but her father cannot face the idea of losing her, so he lays her body on a bed in one of his estates.

Later, a king out hunting in the woods finds her, and since he can’t wake her up, rapes her while she’s unconscious, then heads home to his own country. Some time after that, still unconscious, she gives birth to two children, and one of them accidentally sucks the splinter out of her finger, so she wakes up.

The king who raped her is already married, but he burns his wife alive so he and Talia can be together. Don’t worry, the wife tries to kill and eat the babies first, so it’s all morally sound.


Scary stuff



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 09:04 PM
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Don't be upset, baby - people be dumb. I thought one of my 'meet the dumbest' challenges took place when I carefully explained the concept of rational self-interest to an 'devout, pious & altruistic' dip# of an individual - and it was akin to talking to a wall built of bricks of self-denial which then resorted to attacking me (not the philosophical argument) with childish umbrella statements & nasty name-calling - this was between two grown adults. Let them go...just breathe and let their dumbidity become a distant memoritale :]
edit on 25-11-2015 by kissy princess because: I #ed up again



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 09:18 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler
Given the number and importance of things many people are ignorant about, these two examples seem pretty tame to me. You are correct, of course, but compared to people's ignorance about ISIS, Global Warming, science in general, evolution, politics, etc., your two examples are so inconsequential and trivial that they simply don't warrant much attention.

Maybe not so inconsequential and trivial. If people insist on being willfully ignorant on little things like the OP, that are easily verified, that means anything that requires a little more research and reading is light years beyond their desire to learn or understand, and critical thinking is a foreign concept. It's the little things that point to much bigger problems in a society. Basically. We're screwed.



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 09:38 PM
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a reply to: boncho
Thanks! When I was a kid, my mom got a book of the originals tales. Wow! Some of that stuff was gruesome.



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 09:41 PM
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a reply to: kissy princess
I seldom let it get to the Mr. Poopy Pants stage. I usually just turn and walk away. Life's too short for stupidity.



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 09:43 PM
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a reply to: Klassified


If people insist on being willfully ignorant on little things like the OP, that are easily verified, that means anything that requires a little more research and reading is light years beyond their desire to learn or understand, and critical thinking is a foreign concept.

I couldn't agree more.



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 09:44 PM
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a reply to: Skid Mark

I once asked a young lady what she thought of the protests in Tiananmen Square ( we were in college at the time) and she said that she wasn't into Japanese politics.



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 10:15 PM
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a reply to: CranialSponge

That is awesome. It sounds exactly like some of the tales I would tell my daughter when she was much younger (minus the rape scenes)... She never had nightmares. She did however grow up knowing that the world didn't operate like a Disney Movie.

I know many would line up to tell me that was child abuse now.
She just turned 18 and is more well adjusted than most of her friends.

Come to think of it back when tales like that were more popular, I think a lot of folks were probably more well adjusted.

edit on 11/25/2015 by Kangaruex4Ewe because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 10:30 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy
I know people like that. It makes me wonder.



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 10:32 PM
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a reply to: Kangaruex4Ewe
I wouldn't call it child abuse. I'd call it preparing her for the real world, telling her that the world is nothing like a Disney movie but can be grim at times.



posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 10:34 PM
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a reply to: Kangaruex4Ewe

Knowledge is never child abuse, as far as I'm concerned.

I too had a Grimm fairy tales book as a kid and passed it down to my daughter. She got a kick out of them as much as I did.

But I have to admit that I did fear things that went bump in the night as a kid (not sure if it was actually Grimm's fault or not though)... particularly those nasty things under my bed. I'd switch off my light and then leap 10ft in mid-air across the room onto my bed so nothing could reach out and grab my feet as I was climbing in !

I also admit to being a Disney-holic too though... Can't help myself, I enjoy the fluffy feel-good versions also.

In truth, my Disney movie collection would make any kid cry with jealousy.




posted on Nov, 25 2015 @ 11:13 PM
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I first noticed the re-writing of many of these stories when my youngest daughter got a set of Little Golden Books one Christmas or birthday. (She's 40 now so this was many, many years ago.) The books were radically different from the set of the same publisher's stories in my set. I inherited my set from my elder siblings---probably published in the '50s or earlier.
In my books Little Red Riding Hood's granny got eaten by the wolf but the woodsmen came and killed the wolf and let her out of his belly. The new one was completely different. Same with Peter and the Wolf and several others.
My Dad read those stories to me every night of my life. I don't remember ever being scared by them because they were just stories.
However, after I learned to read I found a very old book in the attic that was about a house with a black cat and kitchen utensils which came to life at night after the family had gone to bed. In that story the villain was a four-sided kitchen grater. THAT scared the bejjjies out of me. I still can't look at one of those graters without a shiver up my spine! I have no idea what the title of the book was, it got lost in the settling of my parents' estate. It was the first book I ever read that truly scared me. I was about five years old at the time. I didn't read any more scary books until I was about 13 and read The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich.




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