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Millennials have no mobility, or purchasing power

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posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 09:35 AM
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not seein this. younger than me flip the values some. got less to work with? something need be changed. good thing they are OKAY with less, quality not quantity what i see these younger folk. another thing weird is you get a generation that is okay with less upwards mobility, means you capitalize on their dumb. gives you more options. why complain about that? it's as always before, just different strategy and tactics get to the same position. you deviate from the herd, command an army of fools and secure enough resources to do what you like. how so? learn the rules, bend them, and counter flow the culture of dumb.

do it like this. take your position, say where you wanna be mid term, like a year or two out. shape your surroundings towards achieving that goal, then reassess and start again higher up. no way you lose, just learn. not sure why people can't get this. live under your means for a decade or two, do whatever you like. build your credit, use it as leverage, increase net worth over time. ain't no debt but what you create. don't play the fool unless you can transform it to your benefit.




posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 10:35 AM
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a reply to: mc_squared




Meanwhile there are also entry level jobs in my field now asking for a PhD. Entry level. Why? Because they can - that's how intense the competition is.


It may seem like that but mainly it's due to the inflation of standard B.A Degrees that are common place now. They're just helping out the post-secondary cash racket that universities got going on now.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 10:38 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

I was born in 91 idk if i count as a Millenial. I own a business and make good money and i currently am a senior in college as well. Collage seems kinda pointless and a debt trap. I believe millenials are not doing well do to brain washed parents who still have a teenagers mentality are trying to raise children in a messed up economy and when i say raise i mean letting the TV and smartphones do most of the work. I feel bad for the children being born today.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 10:47 AM
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originally posted by: SpaDe_
What do you expect from a generation that was raised with no motivational drive or work ethic? Always being given what they wanted and even the failures received participation prizes. The PC crowd screwed an entire generation and they are only now realizing it. The real world is a cruel place where you have to earn what you want and there are no more participation prizes for just showing up.


This is so patently false it's not even funny.

Why Millennials Aren’t Lazy, Spoiled or Entitled…

Millennials Aren't the Lazy Narcissists You Think

Though I'm sure this thread is going to turn into a hatefest between old people and young people like these topics always do (if it hasn't already. Your post was as far as I got in the thread so far). Everyone wants to yell mischaracterizations about the generations they aren't a part of but never acknowledge anything wrong with their own generation.
edit on 24-11-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 10:51 AM
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originally posted by: Metallicus
a reply to: onequestion

I will admit I only have anecdotal evidence regarding this, but of the three recent college graduates I know, all three are working in the industry of their choice and making good money. Are you sure this is actually a thing? One of them actually had multiple job offers including Google.



I'M a millennial working a good job and making good money...



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 12:31 PM
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a reply to: Metallicus

My daughter was born in 1988. We were not wealthy, and are still simply "middle class" - I focused on being able to stay home and raise my own kids until they got into school, when I then went back to work and eventually got my own master's. She worked hard, of her own volition, through high school, graduated second in her class (of suburban middle-class kids) and got herself a scholarship to a prestigious private university (was accepted at a couple of others, as well).

She went straight through, five years, and got her master's in 2012. She is now earning more money than ever came in to her parents' homes - and just got a raise and a promotion.

I sense the OP's frustration, but I am SO SICK of hearing how the Millennials were "pampered special snowflakes" - some of them, yes - the kids of the 1%. Called their folks who paid all the bills and tuition "the rents."

My daughter was the only one of her college mates who knew how to balance a budget, took out loans, and lived without much help from "the rents." We just didn't have much to give her -

she graduated with honors, and is very gainfully employed in her chosen field, able to choose her location with her firm, and has gotten several promotions and raises.

Parenting is the key. My kids WERE taught they could do anything they wanted to do. They were not "beaten", nor were they "pampered." They were taught to price-check, weren't snobs about shopping at thrift stores or buying off-brand groceries. We lived in modest middle-class suburban homes, nothing special, but safe and sound. "Normal."

Parenting. Simply parenting. I tell her so often how proud I am of her, how amazing she is, and she says, "Mommy - it's because of you! YOU did this!" They were never hungry, never in danger, always their minds were nurtured as well as their bodies. I am very, very proud of the job their dad and I did with them (which had a lot to do with their innate abilities, of course).


edit on 11/24/2015 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 01:12 PM
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Again, I am hearing the grumblings of the "bootstrapping" crowd in this post. Other than blind luck, in a niche business venture, this strategy doesn't work anymore.

Keeping up with the basics in terms of education and on-the-job work skills won’t be enough, for jobs requiring future-tech, contemporary labor market, skill-sets. The poor and even the middle class (not the upper middle class) will simply NOT be able to keep up with the skill demands for future employment, which will include REQUIRED CERTIFICATIONS, STATE LICENSING, etc., while somehow the lower class laborers will needs to earn wages, pay mandatory education/licensing fees out of pocket AND keep a roof over their heads ALL at the same time. In the VERY NEAR future, these very high costs skills that will be needed to stay “relevant” in ALL labor markets, will only be affordable to the rich, or possibly, to a VERY few, forward thinking, middle class families, willing to sacrifice everything they have financially, while pooling resources to keep their offspring competitive in the larger job market.

I will begin with the usual assertion I hear in regards to the impact of these, soon to be real, “future-tech jobs", which contrary to beliefs of some, includes the trades and accompanying "proprietary tech" that will not be repairable, only "replaceable by a certified/licensed tech".

“Someone has to get paid to fix the robots!”

I often hear this above noted rebuttal to mass automation and current labor cutting measure in the modern workplace, BUT it misses a subtle point that ONLY the children of the wealthy will have the opportunity to become TRUE experts in such fields. Let me clarify, through the prior 20th century, a poor kid who studied hard could become a lawyer, accountant, even a doctor sometimes, with the right combination of hard work, savings, scholarships, family support, etc. or the lower classes simply went directly into the trades, learning on the job, WITH PAY. HOWEVER, in current engineering and technician curriculum’s today, times have changed, to favor kids whom have had access to expensive software and hardware to “experiment” with and free-time to “practice” on before entering college or into their chosen training program. So, when these kids finally get to college or into their apprenticeships, those whom have had lots of "free time" to “play” with robotics and programming, outside of class, WILL CERTAINLY outpace their less privileged peer who had to flip burgers, part-time, to pay rent and school expenses.

Before 1990, 40% of teenagers had part-time jobs while in school. This is a relevant statistic because today only 20% of teenagers in school have part-time jobs. Teens at one time made up a sizable portion of the workforce and such changes in employment practices have shifted away from this, meaning, poor kids do not have any opportunity to build jobs skills of any kind, before, during and after college.

Although not my primary point, I do think there is plenty of evidence that lower class teens today, not only, do not have the opportunity to get part-time jobs, but in addition the wealthy kids are beginning to develop advanced skill-sets, that COULD be MORE helpful in their future adult careers, than say, “working at a taco stand after school”. Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg are very good, EARLY, examples of people who made use of their free time and access to money, without the need to labor for part-time pay. During that free time they develop specialized skills that could not have been learned at a MINDLESS part-time job or even in formal schooling. In the end, they leveraged free time learning and access to tech, due to having wealthy parents, into long term careers.

Here is a modern example of a company with a big contract to fill and absolutely "no will" to increase wages to attract experienced personnel, nor the desire to train inexperienced ones on the job, while paid. Instead they put out a story on the web bellyaching

bridgemi.com...

In the link below this paragraph, I have posted an example of what I believe to be a young person, from a well off family, who majored in robotics at USC. She doesn’t appear to have had any unrelated part-time job, in relation to her major, while in college. She also seem to have had access to technology, to experiment and PLAY with, in her spare time. She earned her masters & bachelors back-to-back AND at the end of college, got a job offer at a University sponsored dinner party for robotics majors. NOBODY I went to college with, EVER, got a job offer at a university sponsored dinner party. In contrast, I’m sure many Ivy league and top 10 school graduates do get job offers at university sponsored dinner parties. My point being, these future “robot repair jobs” are going to require smart kids, with desire to advance, whom also went to good schools, had lots of spare time and money to play with the tech outside of school AND get their jobs offered at dinner parties, some of which will be non-paying internships at first. These job offers will not be gained through sending out blind jobs applications through Linkedin or company job boards, as has been done up until now. Basically what this girl is doing for Disney will, in the near future, be more like what a plumber or electrician does today, EXCEPT you won’t get trained on the job, in a low-pay apprenticeship, when at “entry level”. In fact to even be considered for these “future-tech jobs” in the first place you’ll need to have good academic pedigree, lots of unpaid hobby experience and 1+ years of unpaid internships. Can kids outside of the upper middle class do the same thing as this young woman? I think not!

Here is her story, readers can decide for themselves, my opinion is that this is what careers in the trades are going to look like in 15+ years:

onedublin.org...

Those whom are going to be rendered jobless by automation/robotics/tech are going to be the least likely to be able to pick up these pieces, in the coming era of traditional jobs destruction. Its going to IMPOSSIBLE for the poor to go back to school and get a masters degree in robotics, in full-time only engineering programs. Contrary to belief these programs strongly discourage their admitted students from taking part-time jobs, while favoring students who have both the money and free time, whom have NEVER work at an unrelated job to their majors and also buy expensive robotics hardware/software to experiment with outside of class.

Mark my words the future labor market in the pursuit of “maintaining robots or other tech” is going to be the sole domain of rich kids, with advanced degrees from good schools because NO ONE is going to train anyone else perceived as lesser, in that kind of job, WITH PAY.

To continue my above point, I believe “rich kid” job mobility is going to be a bigger problem for regular folks beyond what the previous "rich kid" pedigree typically brought in the 20th century. Their unfettered access to endless money and time to “explore” academics and hands-on work, with no consequences, is going to END job mobility of any kind for the lower and middle classes; even for those whom have met the typical required higher education and work experience standards. Its a superstar only job market now, with no room for middle of road folks.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 01:20 PM
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The future is entrepreneurship, plain and simple. That does require some skill, research, mentor ship, apprenticeship, much reading, Free online classes, books from thrift stores, online business plans that you can copy etc. It's all there and anyone can do it. It's not blind luck, but it does require hard work.

I'm not that intelligent, never finished my college degrees, have lost it all and started from scratch....and now I'm a landlord, I own my own business and I'm working on starting several other businesses. With my skill set I'll always have a job, income, no matter what, even if we sink into a recession, I'll leverage my skillset for trade/barter whatever. But I worked hard to get here and I'm still working hard. My children see this hard work and the long hours I work and the things I do. Just my two cents, but I thought it was relevant.

I think younger millenials are tapping into this and us "older' folks dont' understand the world of Uber and airnb whatever and fiver etc. but young millenials do and they're going to get what they want. They are creating the new economy.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 01:24 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs

Then your daughter was lucky, there will always be people that buck the trend because statistics aren't absolute, they only show the bigger picture. Even when everyone is earning less there will be a few who earn more.

I have my situation which I've repeated often enough but then I can look at my two step sisters as well, one finally got a paid position for $10/hour at a company, after working for them for 4 years as an unpaid intern. The other has been working the same job as a tour guide for 10 years now and hasn't seen a raise or a single day in vacation time. I can point to my friends who have engineering degrees that are working in pizza shops and another who went to college with me that spent 1.5 years post graduation working as a sometimes paid sometimes unpaid temp (the whole time for the same company), finally got a permanent position, and now has to quit because he's not paid enough to afford health insurance but makes too much to be covered by Medicaid.

The lack of mobility is very real.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 01:28 PM
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originally posted by: amazing
The future is entrepreneurship, plain and simple. That does require some skill, research, mentor ship, apprenticeship, much reading, Free online classes, books from thrift stores, online business plans that you can copy etc. It's all there and anyone can do it. It's not blind luck, but it does require hard work.


That's my solution, but it's not that easy. In my case it means being a 1 person software/game company which means I need to know how to do a lot. I don't want to be a person who just manages others but has no real skills of my own.

Just recently I went to a game developer conference and sat in on a business management panel. The entire panel was given by people who run companies that put out games, yet every time I asked them a question it was "I can't code, I hire people for that", "I can't draw, I hire people for art", "I don't know how to do sound composition, I hire people". That's precisely the opposite of the type of person I want to be. Managers who don't have the skill to do every job in their company are just leeches who can only get by through using others talents.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 01:32 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs

I had to use the military to pay for college. My parents weren't well off (decently middle class), but we were kind of struggling through the 2000's and the crash in 2008 pretty much made it so I can't ever borrow money from my parents. They make less than I do now. Combined. Plus it tore their relationship apart. So now they are getting a divorce. So they'll have even less money.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 01:45 PM
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originally posted by: amazing
The future is entrepreneurship, plain and simple. That does require some skill, research, mentor ship, apprenticeship, much reading, Free online classes, books from thrift stores, online business plans that you can copy etc. It's all there and anyone can do it. It's not blind luck, but it does require hard work.

I'm not that intelligent, never finished my college degrees, have lost it all and started from scratch....and now I'm a landlord, I own my own business and I'm working on starting several other businesses. With my skill set I'll always have a job, income, no matter what, even if we sink into a recession, I'll leverage my skillset for trade/barter whatever. But I worked hard to get here and I'm still working hard. My children see this hard work and the long hours I work and the things I do. Just my two cents, but I thought it was relevant.

I think younger millenials are tapping into this and us "older' folks dont' understand the world of Uber and airnb whatever and fiver etc. but young millenials do and they're going to get what they want. They are creating the new economy.


Its not "all there", Millenials are not creating a new economy. However, by openly accepting the idea of Uberization in business, they are encouraging a new form of Indentured Servitude, coupled with a western style caste system.

Also note, LUCK, ABSOLUTELY had something to do with your "entrepreneurial" success. Just because you want to lie to yourself, doesn't change the reality of how the current economy is structured.

Did you work hard? Most likely, YES.

Did LUCK have a role in your current windfall, as well? ABSOLUTELY.

Rich people (the TRUE Owners of Capital) can put you out of business ANY TIME they want to. I've heard your kind of story before and not many of them have happy endings, 10+ years later. Yes, its working for you now and you certainly needed to do SOMETHING to keep money coming in, but, in the grand scheme of things, you are, in a way, lying to yourself. Count your blessings and realize that you have lucked into a short term gain, that is currently giving you a comfortable life. The same gains, coupled with lucky moves, can be accomplished with stock investments, thoroughbred yhandicapping or even having a food truck in the right location, at the right time of day, during the right time of year.

Times have changed this isn't the 1970's anymore and the current economy is NOT for small time entrepreneurs as you suggest. Perhaps a perma-1099 workforce, but that's not entrepreneurship, not by a long shot.

Ever heard of the "Killdozer"? He was a "bootsrapping entrepreneur" too, but eventually learned that he really had no control over his financial destiny, especially if someone wealthier wanted to crush his business, for their own gain. Note, what he experienced was not "capitalism" it was plain old FASCISM!

Marvin Heemeyer of Granby, Colorado was a profoundly frustrated muffler repair man. In the late 1990s—after years of protests, petitions, and town meetings—it became obvious to the 52-year-old that he was entwined in a gross miscarriage of justice. His business was ruined by some shady zoning changes, and Heemeyer contended that mayor and city council were corrupt.
edit on 24-11-2015 by boohoo because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

I'm sorry to hear that.

My husband had to use the military, as well....to pay for college (in the IT field). His mom/grandma balked every step of the way.....after all! -- he was supposed to stay home and run the "farm"!!.....the youngest.....

They never ever, except once, came to greet him at the airport... The one time they did, they said to him , "The fence needs fixed."

(rather than 'welcome home and thanks for your service')



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs

Well I was wrapped up in the uber patriotism of 2003, as was my family. We weren't as hardcore as some people, but we definitely repeated the "Support our Troops" mantra. So it wasn't all bad. I was able to get a bunch of seat upgrades at when flying on civilian airlines though. So that was awesome.

Though I couldn't STAND the atmosphere in the military. All ass kissing, office politics, and my way or the highway types. All the tolerable people get out within a few years, while all the assholes make a career out of it. That was my perception I got about it. I'm sure some other military people would angrily disagree with me here, but I am making the caveat that this is my anecdote and it also only applies to the Army. I can't speak for the culture in the other branches.
edit on 24-11-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: boohoo

You seem to be saying that the only reason I'm making money is Luck and that I'll be out of business soon unless some random act/luck happens?

I have to disagree with you. Hard work always pays off. Also the harder you work, the more luck you have. Also what one man can do another can do. Those three sayings guide my life. Then I add two more... persistence is the key and it's not how many times you get knocked down, but how many times you get back up.

The only reason I'm successful is my attitude (failing is not an option and I can and will have anything I want) and the hard work I put into it and my laser focus on helping other people and doing whatever I can to help my customers. (Going above and beyond)

My business is wildly successful. The economy is good but not great, maybe even a little less than good. I get many people interested that can't afford what I offer. If the economy was better I'd be twice as successful. But I work hard everyday and in my off time I read success, business, sales and personal development books and plan how to increase my existing business, diversify and start complimentary businesses.

Anyone can do what I've done and if you want to know how I'll tell you. I can mentor anyone and give you my steps.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 04:01 PM
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originally posted by: amazing
a reply to: boohoo

You seem to be saying that the only reason I'm making money is Luck and that I'll be out of business soon unless some random act/luck happens?

I have to disagree with you. Hard work always pays off. Also the harder you work, the more luck you have. Also what one man can do another can do. Those three sayings guide my life. Then I add two more... persistence is the key and it's not how many times you get knocked down, but how many times you get back up.

The only reason I'm successful is my attitude (failing is not an option and I can and will have anything I want) and the hard work I put into it and my laser focus on helping other people and doing whatever I can to help my customers. (Going above and beyond)

My business is wildly successful. The economy is good but not great, maybe even a little less than good. I get many people interested that can't afford what I offer. If the economy was better I'd be twice as successful. But I work hard everyday and in my off time I read success, business, sales and personal development books and plan how to increase my existing business, diversify and start complimentary businesses.

Anyone can do what I've done and if you want to know how I'll tell you. I can mentor anyone and give you my steps.


I never suggested that people should not work hard.

I also never said, that you, personally, didn't "work hard". But right place, right time, makes up FAR more of when and why success happens, TODAY, when compared to the past (pre-1990's). Back then "luck" and "pedigree" didn't matter nearly as much because of the way the economy was structured.

So, YES, I do mean, that "luck" got you where you are and "luck" will eventually take you away from that place.

Although we won't keep in touch, when that day finally arrives, I hope that you will remember this thread, when you are holding a "bad hand" and all the "hard work" in the world won't change your fate.

The current economy is designed, from top to bottom, to serve the offspring of the wealthy. As I have personally seen before, all it takes is for a couple of laws to change and suddenly you are out of business, through no fault of your own.

So, you say you are in real estate. Here is a small example of a code change that will put many small owners our of business, including both building owners and tenants:

Under the law, property owners will have seven years to fix wood apartments and 25 years to fix concrete buildings. The city has already identified about 13,500 apartment complexes that officials suspect need repairs. A Times investigation in 2013 found more than 1,000 older concrete structures — including landmark buildings in downtown, Hollywood and Westwood — that require close scrutiny for retrofitting. Owners will be required to find a way to pay for the work, which can range from $60,000 to $130,000 for wood apartments and millions of dollars for large concrete towers.

These kinds of ordinances are ALWAYS putting the "little guys" at a disadvantage. Make no mistake, these code changes are DESIGNED to do this. Once passed the banks and other well heeled owners will start buying up property for cheap, while the original owners are forced to sell, due to foreclosure, lawsuits or heavy fines for violating the construction deadlines.

It seems you didn't clearly understand the example I posted, referencing the Killdozer story. You may not go crazy and destroy a town like the Killdozer did, but I GUARANTEE that you WILL eventually face ordinance challenges, like he did, as a property owner, and when they happen, YOU WILL LOSE.

Don't forget when local government passes code changes like these, they were DESIGNED that way, ON PURPOSE, so banks and other well heeled owners can have the opportunity buy up property for cheap, all from people that can't afford to get their properties up to the new code (also don't forget, eminent domain has the same effect as well).
edit on 24-11-2015 by boohoo because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 04:41 PM
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originally posted by: boohoo

originally posted by: amazing
a reply to: boohoo

You seem to be saying that the only reason I'm making money is Luck and that I'll be out of business soon unless some random act/luck happens?

I have to disagree with you. Hard work always pays off. Also the harder you work, the more luck you have. Also what one man can do another can do. Those three sayings guide my life. Then I add two more... persistence is the key and it's not how many times you get knocked down, but how many times you get back up.

The only reason I'm successful is my attitude (failing is not an option and I can and will have anything I want) and the hard work I put into it and my laser focus on helping other people and doing whatever I can to help my customers. (Going above and beyond)

My business is wildly successful. The economy is good but not great, maybe even a little less than good. I get many people interested that can't afford what I offer. If the economy was better I'd be twice as successful. But I work hard everyday and in my off time I read success, business, sales and personal development books and plan how to increase my existing business, diversify and start complimentary businesses.

Anyone can do what I've done and if you want to know how I'll tell you. I can mentor anyone and give you my steps.


I never suggested that people should not work hard.

I also never said, that you, personally, didn't "work hard". But right place, right time, makes up FAR more of when and why success happens, TODAY, when compared to the past (pre-1990's). Back then "luck" and "pedigree" didn't matter nearly as much because of the way the economy was structured.

So, YES, I do mean, that "luck" got you where you are and "luck" will eventually take you away from that place.

Although we won't keep in touch, when that day finally arrives, I hope that you will remember this thread, when you are holding a "bad hand" and all the "hard work" in the world won't change your fate.

The current economy is designed, from top to bottom, to serve the offspring of the wealthy. As I have personally seen before, all it takes is for a couple of laws to change and suddenly you are out of business, through no fault of your own.

So, you say you are in real estate. Here is a small example of a code change that will put many small owners our of business, including both building owners and tenants:

Under the law, property owners will have seven years to fix wood apartments and 25 years to fix concrete buildings. The city has already identified about 13,500 apartment complexes that officials suspect need repairs. A Times investigation in 2013 found more than 1,000 older concrete structures — including landmark buildings in downtown, Hollywood and Westwood — that require close scrutiny for retrofitting. Owners will be required to find a way to pay for the work, which can range from $60,000 to $130,000 for wood apartments and millions of dollars for large concrete towers.

These kinds of ordinances are ALWAYS putting the "little guys" at a disadvantage. Make no mistake, these code changes are DESIGNED to do this. Once passed the banks and other well heeled owners will start buying up property for cheap, while the original owners are forced to sell, due to foreclosure, lawsuits or heavy fines for violating the construction deadlines.

It seems you didn't clearly understand the example I posted, referencing the Killdozer story. You may not go crazy and destroy a town like the Killdozer did, but I GUARANTEE that you WILL eventually face ordinance challenges, like he did, as a property owner, and when they happen, YOU WILL LOSE.

Don't forget when local government passes code changes like these, they were DESIGNED that way, ON PURPOSE, so banks and other well heeled owners can have the opportunity buy up property for cheap, all from people that can't afford to get their properties up to the new code (also don't forget, eminent domain has the same effect as well).


I see what you're saying but I think you are fundamentally wrong.

Yes there is luck. Yes the law the government the game, it's all set up to favor the rich guy or the guy that's already well connected.

However, hard work, the amount of books out there and the internet have given all of us an equal playing field if we only use it.

My landlord stuff is just a side project from having an extra house, that I paid for with hard work, saving money and filling out copious amounts of paperwork and working on my credit score over a period of years.

I'm not sure how to go about our conversation here except to say the following.

If a man was homeless, no college degree, no special skills or special physical attributes. If this man had an average or below average intellect and memory and he had no family support or friends and no special family name and lived in a place with limited job growth and above average amount of poverty. If this man was depressed and lonely and unmarried and had bad teeth and drank too much and had no direction in life and had no idea what he wanted to do with his life.

If I had that man. I could turn him into a success by telling him to follow my footsteps and do all the things that I did. If that man was willing to listen to me and really, really wanted to change his life. That man could own his own business and be as succesful as me. That man could have my mindset and even if a hurricane destroyed his house and business. Even if he got cancer. Even if his wife died. Even if he got sued. Even if the IRS closed his business down. Even if that business failed and he had to declare bankrutpcy and he was left at zero again. That man could rise again and be successful again because he would have the mindset to succeed and keep on succeeding over and over again despite anything this life threw at him.

Luck would have nothing to do with it. He would be a success because he would follow what I tell him to do and his mind would change.

Your mind would change, and you would see that all things are possible if ye but work hard enough and are willing to do what other men have done before you.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: amazing
I see what you're saying but I think you are fundamentally wrong.

Yes there is luck. Yes the law the government the game, it's all set up to favor the rich guy or the guy that's already well connected.

However, hard work, the amount of books out there and the internet have given all of us an equal playing field if we only use it.

My landlord stuff is just a side project from having an extra house, that I paid for with hard work, saving money and filling out copious amounts of paperwork and working on my credit score over a period of years.

I'm not sure how to go about our conversation here except to say the following.

If a man was homeless, no college degree, no special skills or special physical attributes. If this man had an average or below average intellect and memory and he had no family support or friends and no special family name and lived in a place with limited job growth and above average amount of poverty. If this man was depressed and lonely and unmarried and had bad teeth and drank too much and had no direction in life and had no idea what he wanted to do with his life.

If I had that man. I could turn him into a success by telling him to follow my footsteps and do all the things that I did. If that man was willing to listen to me and really, really wanted to change his life. That man could own his own business and be as succesful as me. That man could have my mindset and even if a hurricane destroyed his house and business. Even if he got cancer. Even if his wife died. Even if he got sued. Even if the IRS closed his business down. Even if that business failed and he had to declare bankrutpcy and he was left at zero again. That man could rise again and be successful again because he would have the mindset to succeed and keep on succeeding over and over again despite anything this life threw at him.

Luck would have nothing to do with it. He would be a success because he would follow what I tell him to do and his mind would change.

Your mind would change, and you would see that all things are possible if ye but work hard enough and are willing to do what other men have done before you.


How many years ago, did you make this miraculous transformation, going from broke to wealthy landowner?

Pending on the date, I would be willing to bet my LIFE SAVINGS that you could not merely teach someone to repeat your success formula, without FIRST giving them a significant amount of "seed money".
edit on 24-11-2015 by boohoo because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 04:57 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

they are? where is your proof?



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 05:08 PM
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originally posted by: boohoo

originally posted by: amazing
I see what you're saying but I think you are fundamentally wrong.

Yes there is luck. Yes the law the government the game, it's all set up to favor the rich guy or the guy that's already well connected.

However, hard work, the amount of books out there and the internet have given all of us an equal playing field if we only use it.

My landlord stuff is just a side project from having an extra house, that I paid for with hard work, saving money and filling out copious amounts of paperwork and working on my credit score over a period of years.

I'm not sure how to go about our conversation here except to say the following.

If a man was homeless, no college degree, no special skills or special physical attributes. If this man had an average or below average intellect and memory and he had no family support or friends and no special family name and lived in a place with limited job growth and above average amount of poverty. If this man was depressed and lonely and unmarried and had bad teeth and drank too much and had no direction in life and had no idea what he wanted to do with his life.

If I had that man. I could turn him into a success by telling him to follow my footsteps and do all the things that I did. If that man was willing to listen to me and really, really wanted to change his life. That man could own his own business and be as succesful as me. That man could have my mindset and even if a hurricane destroyed his house and business. Even if he got cancer. Even if his wife died. Even if he got sued. Even if the IRS closed his business down. Even if that business failed and he had to declare bankrutpcy and he was left at zero again. That man could rise again and be successful again because he would have the mindset to succeed and keep on succeeding over and over again despite anything this life threw at him.

Luck would have nothing to do with it. He would be a success because he would follow what I tell him to do and his mind would change.

Your mind would change, and you would see that all things are possible if ye but work hard enough and are willing to do what other men have done before you.


How many years ago, did you make this miraculous transformation, going from broke to wealthy landowner?

Pending on the date, I would be willing to bet my LIFE SAVINGS that you could not merely teach someone to repeat your success formula, without FIRST giving them a significant amount of "seed money".


It's been a slow process. No seed money is required and I'm not really a wealthy land owner. LOL

I got an investor for this business and I did it the old fashioned way. I took 6 months researching and writing a business plan. That required downloading some pre-made business templates and going to the library and borrowing a dozen business plan books, going through all of them and working and changing and rewriting my business plan over and over again until it was good with spreadsheets etc. I had to research my business and especially similar businesses that were successful and all the start up costs associated with it. All this while working a full time job. Then I shopped it around to people I knew and asked them to show it to other people until I got an investor. Who didn't invest in pity but because my plan made financial sense.

Then after that it got rough. I had to look for spots to put my business in and research demographics and find time to meet with landlords and leasing agents all while working full time.

Then I taught myself how to negotiate a lease and get a business license and a tax id number and state sales tax paperwork and everything and then I opened without one single customer and taught myself how to find and get them signed up.

Then I taught myself how to market and create retention plans and everything.

No luck no seed money no wealthy donor. Hard work and persistence. But even before this I studied a few specific skills for years and years and honed them and continue to hone them. Then I read business, sales, personal development, self improvement, self help, leadership, management, success, financial books and still do to this day.


edit on 24-11-2015 by amazing because: (no reason given)




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