It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What is the difference between Scottish Rite and York Rite?

page: 1
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 4 2005 @ 07:58 PM
link   
I was curious as to the differences between the Scottish Rite and York Rite. The final degree in one is 33rd, and the final degree in the other is Knights Templar. And I know one of them has Chrisitan aspects to it. Can anyone clarify this for me?




posted on Jan, 4 2005 @ 08:30 PM
link   
No offence Cheif, but why in the world would you post this question when you already know the answer? OK, maybe you don't know, but I know you have been here long enough to be able to use the search function, and I know that this has been discussed here before.

Are you just going for points or what?

York Rite

Scottish Rite



posted on Jan, 4 2005 @ 08:54 PM
link   
I used the search function, and didn't find a thread with this topic. And there is got to be more two the two rites than what I mentioned. That's all I know about the two rites, one has 33 degrees, the other is different. But there is more than just this.

I don't think the websites you gave me give me the information I'm looking for



posted on Jan, 4 2005 @ 09:09 PM
link   
The York Rite is the oldest Masonic rite, and began in medieval England as a stonemasons guild. Originally it consisted only of two degrees, with the Master Mason degree being added in the early 18th century. Today in the US, the York Rite consists of 4 bodies: Lodge of Master Masons ("Blue Lodge"), Chapter of Royal Arch Masons, Council of Cryptic Masons, and Commandery of Knights Templar.

Scottish Rite was founded in 1801 by merging two French rites: the Rite of Perfection (consisting of 25 degrees) and Philosophical Rite (consisting of 8 degrees). These two Rites were founded in the late 18th century, and were more dedicated to things like philosophy and mysticism than the York Rite, which is based on morality and ethics. The Rite is not Scottish in origin, but received that name because of the title of a degree: Grand Scottish Knight of St. Andrew, which was the 22 in the Rite of Perfection, and is the 29 in the Scottish Rite.

One must be a Christian in order to join the Templars. In England and some other countries, one must be a Christian in order to join Scottish Rite too. However, in the USA, it is only necessary to believe in God in order to join Scottish Rite. In fact, of the Scottish Rite's 11 founders, only 7 were Christians, with the other 4 being Jewish.



posted on Jan, 5 2005 @ 08:18 AM
link   
Now this is what I call investigation

Say why do you all wear funny hats

Are York hats different then Scotts hats

I want one like a shriner Can I buy one
Please tell me where

Yup good meaty mason stuff



posted on Jan, 5 2005 @ 08:27 AM
link   
What is the difference between Scottish Rite and York Rite?

About four and a half pints and a couple of mates.

J/K *runs away*



posted on Jan, 5 2005 @ 01:19 PM
link   
[edit on 5-1-2005 by Masonic Light]



posted on Jan, 5 2005 @ 01:30 PM
link   

Originally posted by chief_counsellor
I used the search function, and didn't find a thread with this topic. And there is got to be more two the two rites than what I mentioned. That's all I know about the two rites, one has 33 degrees, the other is different. But there is more than just this.

I don't think the websites you gave me give me the information I'm looking for


If this site doesn't help I don't know what will...

www.thelodgeroom.com...

It has various side masonic bodies, explanations, etc...
It's one of my favorite sites.



posted on Jan, 5 2005 @ 05:08 PM
link   
masonic light scottish rite is the oldest form of freemasonry. As stated the oldest recorded minutes from a meeting are that of lodge 0. Mother Kilwinning in Scotland this lodge was founded before 1598 and to this day is the oldest working lodge in existance. The united grand lodge of England was founded in 1717, what area of america are you in?



posted on Jan, 5 2005 @ 06:05 PM
link   

Originally posted by orangeman dave
masonic light scottish rite is the oldest form of freemasonry.


The Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite was founded in 1801 in Charleston, South Carolina, USA, by eleven members of the French Rite of Perfection.


As stated the oldest recorded minutes from a meeting are that of lodge 0. Mother Kilwinning in Scotland this lodge was founded before 1598 and to this day is the oldest working lodge in existance. The united grand lodge of England was founded in 1717


The United Grand Lodge of England was formed in the early 1800's, when the Athol Grand Lodge (Antient York Masons) merged with the Premiere Grand Lodge (Free and Accepted Masons). It was the Premiere Grand Lodge that was formed in 1717.

It is true that Mother Kilwinning predates the Grand Lodge; however, there is no evidence that it ever functioned as a Grand Lodge. Furthermore, Lodges in Scotland, as I'm sure you're aware, work only in the Emulation and York Rites. Mother Kilwinning, like all medieval and Renaissance Lodges, were York Rite Lodges.



[edit on 5-1-2005 by Masonic Light]



posted on Jan, 5 2005 @ 06:26 PM
link   
the united grand lodge of England under its present title was formed in 1813 by the union of the Premier Grand Lodge of England, founded in 1717, and the Grand Lodge of England According to the Old Institutions(ancients),founded c.1751



posted on Jan, 5 2005 @ 06:28 PM
link   
The Scottish rite for Scotland, R S Lindsay a book on the Scottish rite



posted on Jan, 5 2005 @ 06:53 PM
link   
As Masonic Light implied I don't think you are quite correct there. I will agree with you that Killwinning is probably one of the oldest Lodges in existence but I doubt that they were doing what would now be called "Scottish Rite" degrees at that time (1598). They were quite possibly not even doing Craft degrees, but more Operative work (ie: actually operating as a guild of stonecutters).


Originally posted by orangeman dave
masonic light scottish rite is the oldest form of freemasonry. As stated the oldest recorded minutes from a meeting are that of lodge 0. Mother Kilwinning in Scotland this lodge was founded before 1598 and to this day is the oldest working lodge in existance. The united grand lodge of England was founded in 1717, what area of america are you in?


Davidg
Scotia Lodge #634
Jerusalem Amity Chptr #8

[edit on 5-1-2005 by davidg]



posted on Jan, 5 2005 @ 10:17 PM
link   
Thank you for the answers to my question on this subject. There does seem to be a little disagreement though.



posted on Jan, 5 2005 @ 10:30 PM
link   
Light guy mustta forgot



posted on Jan, 6 2005 @ 02:29 PM
link   
masonic light sorry you are correct with the york rite. I got my wires crossed i thought because scotland had the oldest lodge it must be us, but after reading the year book i stand corrected apologies.



posted on Jan, 6 2005 @ 07:54 PM
link   
i checked out cotwoms link and while helpful it was a bit confusing. is a mason able to join both the scottish and york rite? and what are the diffrent reasons to join either of the rites?



posted on Jan, 6 2005 @ 09:06 PM
link   
Yes a Mason can join both York and Scottish Rite.
They can also join many other Mason Affiliated groups which there are many.

The reasons are because, the two are very different, and present Masonry from different aspects.

Where I'm at in Oregon, The Scottish Rite is very philosophical and uses various methods and is more common.

The York Rite, is geared more toward Christians, than any other group. To be raised to the last three degrees of York Rite, also called the commandery
one of the requirements is you must believe in the Holy Trinity. So this part of Masonry can be particular with religion. However, as I said Scottish Rite is more popular.

Now just because the York Rite is more Christian than Scottish Rite doesn't mean a Christian must join York. Many Christians join the Scottish Rite. A Christian just might choose York. It's up to you.

Apparently in other parts of the world to join Scottish Rite you must be a Chrisitan, but there's always a loop hole.

Some believe that the Royal Arch Degree of the York Rite is the completion of the Master Mason Degree, because it reveals the Master Masons Word, and without that Word a man cannot truly be a Mason. Scottish Rite has a version of this Degree but doesn't give the Masons Word.

Here's a qoute from the above mentioned link when talking about Craft Masonry (first three degrees)...


Beyond the Craft Degrees are several bodies of Masonry that have been erroneously referred to as higher degrees. The third degree of Masonry, The Master Mason is the highest degree of Masonry, and while the interested Master Mason will greatly benefit from an association with the Scottish Rite and the York Rite, these degrees are additional degrees and not higher degrees.

While this point of view is no doubt at variance with many that will read it allow me to quote from a portion of the 1813 articles of union, which stated:

"It is declared and pronounced that pure Atient (sic) Masonry consists of three degrees, and no more viz: those of the entered apprentice, the Fellowcraft, and the Master Mason, including the Supreme Order of the Holy royal Arch." *

Article II from the 1813 Articles of Union, which formed the U.G.L.E.

*In the United Kingdom the Royal Arch is part of the third degree


Also the Mark Master Degree of the York Rite in some parts of the world used to be side or part of the 2nd Degree of Masonry. For some reason, it was removed and put in York Rite.

So many believe that a Mason hasn't completely become a Master Mason until they have gone through the Royal Arch Degree of the York Rite (also called the Royal Arch Chapter or Capitular Degrees).
When visitning that link really look around and click on the links to each to get more info.

Hope that helps.

BTW: My preference is York Rite because in the Templar Degree, I have an excuse to wear my sword. (It's part of the uniform. )


[edit on 1/6/2005 by cotwom]



posted on Jan, 7 2005 @ 02:05 PM
link   
cotwom, i have had my mark degree, here in scotland its a continuation of the fellow craft. Does this mean Scottish masonry is york rite? By the way yous lads must have some amount of spare time or understanding better halves to be able to attend all those different orders



posted on Jan, 7 2005 @ 02:37 PM
link   
Dave
Honestly I'm not sure if York is more prevalent in Scotland, but no, Scottish Masonry is not York Rite. In the USA, Mark Master WAS part of the Second Degree. For some reason it was removed and incoporated to York Rite.

But as part of the Fellowcraft Degree it should be. This is why many feel that without completing the York Rite Capitular Degrees
*Mark Master
*Past (Virtual) Master
*Most Excellent Master
*Royal Arch Mason

A Mason is not yet a true Master Mason

In fact many Masons complete the first three Blue Lodge degrees,
go through the Royal Arch Degrees of York Rite without going through Royal and Select Master Degrees or Templar Commandery Degrees,
then they go through Scottish Rite.

That's actually VERY common.

As far as having Very understanding better halves...
we keep them busy with Eastern Star.


[edit on 1/7/2005 by cotwom]



new topics




 
0
<<   2 >>

log in

join