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Amazing photographs of the only surviving Horten 229 V3

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posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 01:56 PM
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she must have been something to see when new...

*sigh* miss working the flight line...




posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 02:05 PM
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a reply to: Sammamishman
Cheers, thanks for the answer.



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 02:21 PM
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originally posted by: paraphi
I think the Brits were developing flying wings at the same time as the Germans.

There's a strange tendency to over-egg Nazi aircraft design. The Horton design was just one of a number of failed Nazi prototypes or models that were developed haphazardly in an frantic attempt to die slower. That is to say, had the Nazi's properly invested, then they may have produced a design that worked and extended the pain by a day, or two. Too little too late.




According to an American TV program on the flying wing, the Horton flew twice, but crashed on the second landing...



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 02:40 PM
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Jack Northrop flew the Avion 1, which was a twin boom, semi flying wing design (it didn't have a conventional fuselage) in 1929. His N-1, the first true tailless flying wing flew in 1940. His designs go back to the early to mid 20s.

The Horton brothers flew their H.1 glider in 1933, with the H.II and finally the H.III motorglider. Their first fully powered design was the H.Va which crashed on its only flight in 1937.

At the same time designers in the Soviet Union were working on their own design as early as 1921. They flew a design in 1926 as a glider initially.

So while Germany has the most recognized, and people like to claim how far ahead they were, at least five countries were working on the same design at about the same time.



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 02:42 PM
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a reply to: stuthealien

Which doesn't change the fact that he wasn't the only one working on it, and others had proposed it as far as 30 years before he brought it up originally. That doesn't make Germany 60 years ahead by any stretch.



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 02:46 PM
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All of the pure wing designs were a bit ahead of their time.
Not many produced before the B-2, were there?
Controlling them is tough, and most proved to be dangerous to fly.



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 02:49 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

None operationally. There were quite a few different designs flown though.



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 03:03 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: butcherguy

None operationally. There were quite a few different designs flown though.

The successful one came after computer generated stability controls were available.



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 03:16 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

The YB-35/49 were actually quite stable and remarkable designs. They fell pray to possible sabotage and the fact that they were too radically different to gain acceptance.



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 03:49 PM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

That is one of my favorite planes to ogle when I'm at the Udvar-Hazy center. It's just a really cool concept that could have possibly changed the tide of the war, had the Hitler regime had more time, and resources.



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 05:19 PM
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Does anyone know what happened to the brothers?



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: Spader

One remained in Germany one went to Argentina. They both died in the 90s.



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 06:52 PM
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Not to take anything away from the Horten, but the Me163 is considered a flying wing...and that one actually flew. Also, the jet engine was invented in Briton, who also had some flying wings on paper.



posted on Nov, 21 2015 @ 07:42 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: butcherguy

The YB-35/49 were actually quite stable and remarkable designs. They fell pray to possible sabotage and the fact that they were too radically different to gain acceptance.

There will always be differences in opinion on it.
I would like to interview Glen Edwards to get his firsthand opinion on the YB-49, but I don't trust mediums.



posted on Nov, 21 2015 @ 07:50 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

That crash appeared to be structurally related, not related to stability issues. It's possible that the outer wing panels suffered an over G situation during stall recovery testing.



posted on Nov, 21 2015 @ 08:07 AM
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How come German psychic channelers get awesome
aircraft schematics from their hosts and the rest of the world
gets doe eyed nuts talking about Pleadians ?



posted on Nov, 21 2015 @ 08:12 AM
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originally posted by: Tuned Agent
Also, the jet engine was invented in Briton...

The first ever gas turbine, yes...jet engine, no.

The first 'gas turbine' was patented in England in 1791. No working model was ever produced.

The first ever self sustaining 'gas turbine' occurred in Norway, in 1903.

The first ever patent of a 'jet-engine' (a gas turbine powering an aircraft) occurred in France in 1921. England followed shortly after, with a patent filed in 1930.

First ever 'jet-engine' to fly occurred in Germany, in 1939.

As much as we like to pretend that an individual genius made jet powered flight possible, it is highly unlikely that the first flight ever takes place if many of the preceding steps do not occur.



posted on Nov, 21 2015 @ 08:14 AM
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a reply to: peck420

You can watch as the jet engine, the flying wing, and a number of other advances occurred in multiple countries all at about the same time. It's amazing how it happened.



posted on Nov, 21 2015 @ 08:17 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
You can watch as the jet engine, the flying wing, and a number of other advances occurred in multiple countries all at about the same time. It's amazing how it happened.

It almost makes me think that large portions of the scientific community cares not for politics. Good ideas seem to get around regardless of extenuating factors.



posted on Nov, 21 2015 @ 08:57 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: peck420

You can watch as the jet engine, the flying wing, and a number of other advances occurred in multiple countries all at about the same time. It's amazing how it happened.


yes, but only German engineers develop those inventions to a practical use.




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