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Super Bacteria Coming to Kill Us Is Imminent

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posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 03:45 PM
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a reply to: Vroomfondel

So in short, you fear that the proposal (shipping to Asia and back from there) could be motivated by a rather sinister agenda, since it makes no sense financially.

In which case I feel your fear is not unfounded.




posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 04:28 PM
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originally posted by: Misterlondon
Probably the same as swine flu, bird flu and mad cow disease...
What happened to those?


Mad Cow disease was caused by a certain British governments deciding to cut the "red tape of bureaucracy" and abandoning traditional farm practices of not feeding cattle foodstocks made from cattle brains and spinal tissue. The other interesting part was that at this time, the Americans had just discovered that it could be theoretically possible that certain types of proteins in the brain could actually modify the shape of each other and replicate ie prions

Swine flu comes from bird flu, and that comes from natural mutations in huge populations.

There was some theories that the human flu variants were man-made since genetic analysis revealed that the flu virus came from three different genotypes that had been spliced together. There were a couple of French researchers in London who were killed in their apartment.



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 05:52 PM
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a reply to: DJMSN

"...as of 2011...".

Any idea the stats not 4 years old?



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: NewzNose

My guess is that's the latest "census" available. There may well be more up to date stats available,those were the first I grabbed but they have not declined only grown larger. If there is a depopulation plan, they suck at it.



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 07:07 PM
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originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: Vroomfondel

So in short, you fear that the proposal (shipping to Asia and back from there) could be motivated by a rather sinister agenda, since it makes no sense financially.

In which case I feel your fear is not unfounded.


Exactly.



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 07:31 PM
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originally posted by: Vroomfondel

I really wanted to put this in the NWO forum. I believe this is yet another step in the systematic reduction of the population. I find it very suspicious that within months of the discovery of this super-resistant bacteria that so many food producers in the US feel it is "financially preferable" to send food from the US to China to be processed, then shipped back to the US for sale. All that shipping is somehow preferable and financially more attractive to keeping it here in the US? I find that very hard to believe.

This is a disaster of truly epidemic proportions waiting to happen...



I think you might be onto something there, it just so happened the it's now OK to consume Genetically Modified - Food Stuff in the US.

Modified to include Super bacteria...dun, dun. duuunnnn

edit on 19-11-2015 by InnerPeace2012 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 07:37 PM
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Quick! Buy stock in Cellceutix!



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: Vroomfondel This is a disaster of truly epidemic proportions waiting to happen...


indeed. the repercussions down the line may be catastrophic.



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 10:05 PM
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Ahhh. Don't worry, just make friends with the bacteria if it enters your body, tell it to try to fit in with the other microbes and you can all live in harmony. I bet they would listen more than the leaders of many world governments do.



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 07:13 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Ahhh. Don't worry, just make friends with the bacteria if it enters your body, tell it to try to fit in with the other microbes and you can all live in harmony. I bet they would listen more than the leaders of many world governments do.


Well, that is one way to do it...

I am not sure the bacteria will assimilate well. Its not in their nature to do so. History has shown they invade, turn native cells over or destroy them if they fail to comply. They are very single-minded creatures. For such vast numbers, a single mind is not a lot to work with for the individual. I am afraid that making friends and seeking harmony may appear to be working at first, but with infections the symptoms do not usually become evident until the host is no longer able to keep the invading cells at bay. The battle began long before the first symptom appeared. Our first becoming aware of the condition is not the moment when the condition began, but rather the moment when the host began losing the battle. From there it is always an uphill fight. Momentum and numbers are on their side.

If the infection is severe enough, it is sometimes necessary to amputate the affected area to save body. Bacteria are depressingly stupid. They destroy their hosts to the point they are no longer able to survive, forcing them to find a new host or become extinct. You would think hosts who pay attention would know that and be wary of it yet there always seems to be a willing supply of hosts ready to step up and take the risk. For some unknown reason they feel immune to effects of the bacteria, most likely because they led sheltered lives that did not afford them access to the kind of first hand knowledge and experience they need to deal with such things. In some cases, slow limited exposure to the bacteria can increase the hosts ability to fend off future attacks. In other cases however, slow steady exposure leads the host into a false sense of security rendering them helpless when the infection finally takes hold. It prompts a severe auto-immune reaction, often so severe it turns on its on cells as much or more than the invading cells. The real problem is the invading cells know this and depend on it. They gain a foothold, weaken your defenses over time, then attack when you are most susceptible and end up using you to unwittingly further their cause. You become the motive force behind he spread of the infection. That is not a very good "You are welcome" for the efforts at helping them assimilate, but reality is often filled with harsh responses to acts of kindness. No good deed goes unpunished.



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 07:17 AM
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Even if there is a bacteria that is completely immune to all known antibiotics, it still couldn't kill off humanity. The fact is that all diseases have infection rates and no infection rate is 100% (because of evolution and genetic drift).

Also, keep in mind, the higher the infection rate, the harder it is to control as a weapon. It is too easy to infect your own people.



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 09:57 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
Even if there is a bacteria that is completely immune to all known antibiotics, it still couldn't kill off humanity. The fact is that all diseases have infection rates and no infection rate is 100% (because of evolution and genetic drift).

Also, keep in mind, the higher the infection rate, the harder it is to control as a weapon. It is too easy to infect your own people.


I don't believe it is a weapon, as in something created to be used in such manner. I believe that its discovery is being seen by people with such an agenda as an opportunity they can pursue with plausible denial.



posted on Nov, 21 2015 @ 02:10 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
Even if there is a bacteria that is completely immune to all known antibiotics, it still couldn't kill off humanity. The fact is that all diseases have infection rates and no infection rate is 100% (because of evolution and genetic drift).

Also, keep in mind, the higher the infection rate, the harder it is to control as a weapon. It is too easy to infect your own people.


You must also take into consideration the very high rate of mutation for this bacteria. That makes it more likely to infect more people with more severe consequences. Once a bacterial infection reaches your bloodstream, you are in for a very bumpy ride that could end very prematurely. I have been on IV antibiotics three times and was hospitalized twice for it. Three times in the last two years I could have died from a highly resistant strain. I am very cautious regarding this subject.



posted on Nov, 21 2015 @ 08:47 PM
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There is yet another aspect to this that bothers me and has me suspicious.

It made the news recently that the FDA has declared that bacon and processed meat are as dangerous as second hand smoke. A lot of people are going to be getting very sick and now the FDA has conveniently provided a neat little pre-packaged excuse.



posted on Nov, 23 2015 @ 06:50 AM
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a reply to: Vroomfondel

No infection has mutated enough to stay above the kill rate. The thing is that if you want a truly devestating disease. You need to balance incubation rate with how quickly it kills someone. If you are relying on mutations to keep this thing deadly, those mutations are surely going to screw up that balance. If the incubation rate drops to low then it will just hospitalize someone too fast for them to infect more people. If it kills people too quickly then even when hospitalized, there would be limited ways for it to infect someone treating that person because they'd die too quickly. Plus a fast incubation period alerts authorities to who is infected for quarantine that much easier.

Then despite all of this, no disease has a 100% infection rate. Even with mutations keeping it a step above antibiotics. So, unless the disease mutated intelligently (and there has been no disease to ever do this), it could never stay a step above our antibiotics forever.
edit on 23-11-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 11:10 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Vroomfondel

No infection has mutated enough to stay above the kill rate. The thing is that if you want a truly devestating disease. You need to balance incubation rate with how quickly it kills someone. If you are relying on mutations to keep this thing deadly, those mutations are surely going to screw up that balance. If the incubation rate drops to low then it will just hospitalize someone too fast for them to infect more people. If it kills people too quickly then even when hospitalized, there would be limited ways for it to infect someone treating that person because they'd die too quickly. Plus a fast incubation period alerts authorities to who is infected for quarantine that much easier.

Then despite all of this, no disease has a 100% infection rate. Even with mutations keeping it a step above antibiotics. So, unless the disease mutated intelligently (and there has been no disease to ever do this), it could never stay a step above our antibiotics forever.


You are largely correct in your assessment of the length of incubation vs. the potential for infection. However, you are looking at the mutation as linear. It is not. One bug can creates millions of offspring, each with its own path of mutation. You could, and probably do, literally have millions of mutations diverging at various points along the path. Some will mutate to become more effective killers, some less. Some will mutate to infect faster, some slower. And so on. Eventually you end up with one that has survived the longest by combining the best traits, or worst depending on your point of view, and becomes the dominant strain. Anywhere along the way there could be disastrous consequences of this evolution.

Also you must consider that we are on the last round of viable antibiotics. There are no more. Every variation possible has been used, overused, and is becoming less and less likely to be effective. We already have numerous strains of bacteria that could kill us off quickly were it not for the last few variations of antibiotics that still work. The bugs are getting more resistant and there are no more variations to fall back on.

Unless a completely new kind of antibiotic is developed, and soon, we could be in a lot of trouble.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 11:17 AM
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If you enjoys yourself #less. Then the fact that a lot of viruses are now becoming resistant to antibiotics, meaning any invaisive surgery will possibly come with much higher risks and things like E. coli and chest infections will be fatal. It's got nothing to do with the NWO. It's basically a result of industrialised farming and feeding animals antibiotics.

You'll die of some curable disease more than likely.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: Vroomfondel

Sigh. Listen, everything is trying to kill you. That's what being alive is. No, a super-bug isn't going to kill everyone. The thing it's resistant to is a "last line of defense"--meaning that there are other lines of defense preceding it. That's what that means.



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: Vroomfondel

I mean I know how evolution works, but mutations don't happen as quickly as you are describing. Name ONE epidemic that attacked humanity where the disease mutated while it was still effective, thus preventing a treatment from working.


Also you must consider that we are on the last round of viable antibiotics. There are no more. Every variation possible has been used, overused, and is becoming less and less likely to be effective. We already have numerous strains of bacteria that could kill us off quickly were it not for the last few variations of antibiotics that still work. The bugs are getting more resistant and there are no more variations to fall back on.


I am already well aware of the problems around the pharmaceutical industry running out of viable compounds to release as new medicines. I work for a pharmaceutical manufacturing company after all. You aren't entirely correct here though. We haven't actually ran out of chemical compounds yet, but we are getting close.

The pharmaceutical industry is actually already well aware of this problem too. Many pharmaceutical companies are moving into biotechnology and other cutting edge medical fields to try to get around this problem before it actually takes a toll on our society. Naturally money is the motivator here since pharmaceutical companies make most of their profits off of drugs on patents, so if we run out of new medical compounds, then the pharmaceutical industry will tank shortly afterwards. This is actually one of the few times that profits and better society are actually aligning naturally.
edit on 24-11-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2015 @ 12:20 PM
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The pharmaceutical industry has not created new stuff in a long time dealing with bacterial infections since there just is no money to be made unlike other drugs, but as China gets hit hard that will most likely change. Everyone knew this was coming since it is the nature of bacteria, but even they are limited and these super strains are many times weak again other bacteria that can be cured.




edit on 24-11-2015 by Xtrozero because: (no reason given)



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