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Scientists have captured the first images of a new planet forming

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posted on Nov, 18 2015 @ 05:57 PM
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Other worlds found in the making. I just hope they turn out to be a better place than our current rock.

IT IS being hailed as a major breakthrough, a world-first and proof of a long-held theory.

Scientists in Australia and the US have captured the first-ever images of a planet in the making — and they’re a little excited.

None of the nearly 1900 planets previously discovered and confirmed outside our Solar System (called exoplanets) are in the process of formation.
Using the most sophisticated and largest telescopes in the world, the teams were able to observe the process by which a planet forms and grows.



The telltale signs, according to the research findings published in the journal Nature today, were the accumulation of dust and gas particles on the said star known as LkCa 15.

Artists impression below:


This new planet is located 450 light years away from Earth.
www.news.com.au... 22898978b8026a183271




posted on Nov, 18 2015 @ 06:45 PM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno

Impressive!

fixed link



posted on Nov, 18 2015 @ 07:20 PM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian
a reply to: CaptainBeno

Impressive!

fixed link


Good work there, the original link nearly bugjiggered me.

Anyway I get the picture now, it's the red that's the forming planet around the star. So, what's all the grey stuff way out on the periphery that has white highlights, more planet forming material?

I don't get that as yet!



posted on Nov, 18 2015 @ 08:00 PM
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is anybody keeping track of how many days it takes?

...sorry, i had to.



posted on Nov, 18 2015 @ 08:08 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

Cheers!



posted on Nov, 18 2015 @ 08:09 PM
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a reply to: TzarChasm

Seven according to the big man............Pffft!



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 03:08 AM
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Here's the article from the "horse's mouth", Stanford University: news.stanford.edu...

A couple of things I find notable:

1. The researchers designed their own imaging instrument to look for a characteristic planet formation signature.

2. The two main researchers are graduate students. If anything, this discovery should grant them their PhDs.

And of course it's great to see that this was an international collaboration.



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 06:27 AM
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This new planet is located 450 light years away from Earth.
Let's push people, further away, from the "creation" theory.

How can a camera capture an object that's 450 light years away from Earth? Even if the camera was 1 light year closer, (which it's not) it still wouldn't "capture an object."

At some point, we're going to have to do more than just "wake up".



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: JuJuBee
Lmao. That ignorance cheered me up.
Just seen your a smoker. Your letting the rest of us down.

edit on 19-11-2015 by rossacus because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 09:26 AM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno

Actually, just one...then he added stuff to it later



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 12:32 PM
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a reply to: JuJuBee



How can a camera capture an object that's 450 light years away from Earth?


It can't. If they could, then surely they could take a really good image of the nearest star to us at around 4 LY, but they can't even do that. To take a picture of the nearest star would require a lens or mirror 625 kilometres in diameter. Astronomy now is done by mathemagics.



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 05:09 PM
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originally posted by: GaryN
a reply to: JuJuBee



How can a camera capture an object that's 450 light years away from Earth?


It can't. If they could, then surely they could take a really good image of the nearest star to us at around 4 LY, but they can't even do that. To take a picture of the nearest star would require a lens or mirror 625 kilometres in diameter. Astronomy now is done by mathemagics.

There's a difference between resolving an object, and simply detecting it.

Besides, the most cutting-edge adaptive optics can actually resolve some stars into discs. www.gizmag.com...



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 08:51 AM
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I just find it amazing how we can theorize these things on our planet, but are then able to verify that it actually exists.



posted on Nov, 20 2015 @ 01:46 PM
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duhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
we all know that! lil over couple days.....u know, uww holidays soon too right, there you go, the mood is set for a week off...
a reply to: TzarChasm




posted on Nov, 21 2015 @ 08:23 AM
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LOL, everyone knows it takes 7 days, then God will need a rest. At least that's what happened here on earth.



posted on Nov, 22 2015 @ 02:09 PM
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I can't really make up my opinion on this, is it real or fake? As I was reading through the comments of this thread I noticed that some people have been saying that you would need a massive lense, which is one of the things we don't have, so how is this real?



posted on Nov, 22 2015 @ 03:41 PM
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a reply to: Foxxer




The findings, which was led by University of Arizona graduates Steph Sallum and Kate Follette, were only possible because of very specialised equipment.
These included the Large Binocular Telescope, or LBT– the world’s largest telescope, located on Arizona’s Mount Graham, and the University of Arizona’s Magellan Telescope and its Adaptive Optics System, MagAO, located in Chile.
Being able to crack the mystery was only possible because of the Large Binocular Telescope was purpose-built, using a novel imaging technique to sharpen the images, the paper says.



posted on Nov, 22 2015 @ 05:59 PM
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And yet we can't see the elusive PlanetX/Nibiru.

With that said...Nice find OP it is amazing what technology is allowing us to see.



posted on Nov, 22 2015 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: tsurfer2000h

.......or not. Well, what "they" tell us at least.

I'm sure they keep a hell of a lot secret.

But, any thank buddy
Cheers!



posted on Nov, 22 2015 @ 10:57 PM
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originally posted by: CaptainBeno
a reply to: tsurfer2000h

.......or not. Well, what "they" tell us at least.

I'm sure they keep a hell of a lot secret.

Graduate students keeping astronomy findings secret? Someone needs to have a word with them, tsk tsk tsk...




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