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Boeing's CMCA could be more relevant today than ever before.

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posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 02:39 PM
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a reply to: mbkennel

Over 200,000 pounds of weight difference to play with, more room for C3 systems, more weapons per platform, which requires fewer platforms....




posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 02:47 PM
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I thought this was the plan all along? Have stealthy drones go in first, jam/disable radar and then send F-35's and F-22's in to blow immediate threats up and relay sensor data back to the big, unstealthy plane with the missiles?

The big unstealthy plane is way outside enemy reach, and only the fighter planes carry any risk. They're feeding data and helping the big plane target and strike inside enemy airspace...?

I swear I've seen videos and power point slides for exactly this.



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 05:41 PM
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Another avenue that this type of idea might hold traction is if the bomber build goes the same way as the B-2. Only a small number of bombers being built and not enough of them to carry all the precision long range weapons that are needed to deal with the threats. These would take the place of bombers over the target area and replace the older B-52/B-1 fleet as they were retired.
An aircraft of this type could also be the swarm UAV carrier. Stuff it full of your semi-expendable swarm UAV's, keep it at stand-off range and release them to do the bidding of any F-35's, LRSB's, ground combat units, ect. that are in the combat arena.



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 05:49 PM
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It will be a new way of conducting warfare on an old idea and it will work if the trials are successful and the money poured into it are cost effective.



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 10:54 PM
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With 747-8 production potentially ending sometime around the end of the decade (2020-ish), a decision to pursue this project would have to be made in relatively short order.

I don't know enough about either airplanes or DOD procurement to speculate on either of these questions, but does anyone have insight into (1) whether it would be practical to modify existing aircraft into CMCAs or (2) if Boeing would be in a position to offer an attractive price on new aircraft as a means of keeping the line open for a few more years?



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 11:36 PM
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a reply to: PhloydPhan

Yes to both, although it would be easiest to do it with a new build aircraft.



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