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Dalai Lama on Paris attacks: 'Work for peace, and don't expect help from God and governments'

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posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 08:26 PM
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I find it strange writing this post. I am an atheist, perhaps mostly in my conclusion that there is no supreme being and for the most part religion is used as a tool of control.

However, I will admit that science does not yet have the answer to the question of human consciousness. While I do not see any direct benefit to prayer, perhaps to the faithful it can serve as a tool to focus ones thoughts on the subject.

The Dalai Lama's statement on the Paris terror attacks struck a chord in me and I thought I would share it with the members of ATS in an effort to help cool down the heated thoughts/words that our community seems to be facing over the last few days.




People want to lead a peaceful lives. The terrorists are short-sighted, and this is one of the causes of rampant suicide bombings. We cannot solve this problem only through prayers. I am a Buddhist and I believe in praying. But humans have created this problem, and now we are asking God to solve it. It is illogical. God would say, solve it yourself because you created it in the first place. We need a systematic approach to foster humanistic values, of oneness and harmony. If we start doing it now, there is hope that this century will be different from the previous one. It is in everybody's interest. So let us work for peace within our families and society, and not expect help from God, Buddha or the governments.


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edit on 17-11-2015 by Dreamwatcher because: Clarity




posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 08:28 PM
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a reply to: Dreamwatcher

this struck a chord with me as well - thanks for sharing OP



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 08:35 PM
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a reply to: Dreamwatcher


But humans have created this problem, and now we are asking God to solve it. It is illogical. God would say, solve it yourself because you created it in the first place.

I liked his response when asked about the Israel / Palestine problem, too.

They should get together and have a picnic. Practice breaking bread instead of each other. (paraphrased, sorry no link)



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 09:07 PM
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a reply to: Dreamwatcher

We shouldn't need Jesus to descend from the sky to live peacefully.

We just need to want peace and elect peaceful leaders.



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 09:55 PM
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a reply to: Dreamwatcher

Athiesm/agnosticism and Buddhism are curious bedfellows. Often having equivalent intuition and parrellel conclusions but found by different paths


I haven't found a more synchronized 'dance' from two opposites like these.

Ghost
edit on 17-11-2015 by ghostrager because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: Dreamwatcher

Actually the Dalai Lama's, as a Buddhist, is also an atheist as Buddhism doesn't believe in a God


Well at least not the sky God of Western religion



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 10:07 PM
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Well, he isn't wrong. Humans made the mess, so crying about it to the sky dude doesn't make any sense. Like I have to tell my kids when it comes to cleaning up their room, "You made this mess, now you get to clean it up. Nobody else is going to do it for you." I don't believe in god, but if there is one, no god is going to fix what we broke just because people prayed for him/her/it to do so. My kids can cry, beg, protest & come up with excuses all they want, they're still cleaning up their room themselves.



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 10:37 PM
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The best thing I've read all week, maybe all year.

Star and Flag



posted on Nov, 18 2015 @ 05:56 PM
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a reply to: ghostrager

Looking back at my life, your point is reflected.

I was raised Catholic, including private Catholic schools up until high school. Though I do not remember the reasons why, after all this was over 25 years ago, I asked my parents to send me to public high school and they agreed.

In my early 20's I met a co-worker, later became a close friend, who was a long practicing Zen Buddhist. He opened my mind to many things and during our friendship I came to view existence quite differently. At a certain point I had moved out of state and we lost touch. Eventually I became atheist, though much of what he taught me remains part of my world view.

Strange bedfellows indeed!




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