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31 Long-Forgotten Native American Medicinal Cures

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posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 07:12 AM
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I figured many on this forum would be interested in some of these American Indian cures that were used before pills started costing a fortune.
www.realfarmacy.com...


1. Alfalfa: Relieves digestion and is used to aid blood clotting. Contemporary uses included treatment of arthritis, bladder and kidney conditions and bone strength. Enhances the immune system.

2. Aloe: A cactus-like plant. The thick leaves can be squeezed to extrude a thick sap that can be used to treat burns, insect bites and wounds.

3. Aspen: The inner bark or xylem is used in a tea to treat fever, coughs and pain. It contains salicin, which also is found in willow trees and is the foundation ingredient for aspirin.

4. Bee pollen: When mixed with food it can boost energy, aid digestion and enhance the immune system. If you’re allergic to bee stings you will most likely be allergic to bee pollen.

5. Beeswax: Used as a salve for burns and insect bites, including bee stings. Intended to only be used externally.

6. Blackberry: The root, bark and leaves when crushed and infused in a tea are used to treat diarrhea, reduce inflammation and stimulate the metabolism. As a gargle it treats sore throats, mouth ulcers and inflammation of the gums.

7. Black Raspberry: The roots of this plant are crushed and used as a tea or boiled and chewed to relieve coughs, diarrhea and general intestinal distress.

8. Buckwheat: The seeds are used in soups and as porridge to lower blood pressure, help with blood clotting and relieve diarrhea.

9. Cayenne: The pods are used as a pain reliever when taken with food or drunk in a tea. Also used to threat arthritis and digestive distress. It is sometimes applied to wounds as a powder to increase blood flow and act as an antiseptic and anesthetic to numb the pain.

10. Chamomile: The leaves and flowers are used as a tea to treat intestinal problems and nausea.


See above link for other cures used




posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 07:23 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

I have used many of the items on that list.

I despise taking pills.



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 07:26 AM
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My native friend said that when camphor or eucalyptus isnt available you can use a skunk to cure pneumonia. I just shook my head and said "humm good to know".



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 07:32 AM
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I use Cayenne powder for arthritis. Use 1/8 tsp in 1 1/2 cups of warm water - You Do Not Want To Make It Strong - then rub on your hands, or use a cloth to dab on whatever joint is sore.
Wash your hands before you go to the bathroom!!!!!



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 07:39 AM
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Interesting timing for this thread, a friend and I have been making some of our own "medicines". I have to question why this list does not contain plantain though. Very much used by Native Americans. Wonderful healing for minor cuts, bruising and the like. You can make a lotion of it, or even chew up the leaves and apply directly.

Thanks for the link though!



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 07:53 AM
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a reply to: chiefsmom

When talking about "plantain" you should probably let'em know you mean this -



Not this -




posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 08:30 AM
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Honey for birth control. Squeezed up yonder with a buffalo bladder. The pope wouldn't promote the practice.



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 08:40 AM
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Its shocking how many antibiotic weeds just grow in the weed patch. I counted all of these medicinals in the matter of a few minutes.
As an herbalist Ive been more interested in learning the local native weeds because it doesnt do any good in an emergency if you cant find herbs that are shipped here from China. Most of the people I give herbs too, can not afford to go buy the herbs. So, is a great resource when you learn to identify what is available around you. This is a list of the wild herbs in my field:

Chickweed, Cleavers, (those little velcro balls), mullien. astragalus, curlydock, wild chamomile (looks like tiny pineapples) chickory, horsetail grass, devils bit, dandilion, eyebright, purslane, manzanita, st johns wort, scarlet pimpernal, self-heal, violets, yarrow, and a bunch more I cant remember.

These are super common herbal medicinals used by the natives. Its a really good Idea to look them up and learn to identify them. When I camp with my grandkids, part of our walk includes me pointing out the many herbs, what they are used for and what ever interesting lore associated with it to make it amusing to the little ones.

Many of these herbs are common all over the world. Its a really good idea to know what is available in the wild around your house. Ive heard many times that the Irish famine would never have happened if the people would not have forgotten the foods and meds their ancestors had eaten. They starved while being surrounded by foragable foods.



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

I came from a homeopathic home and was given many of these. I recall my Grandmother going on about bruising the alfalfa! I was given whiskey and cayenne pepper to clear out bronchitis and bring down fever. I always passed out afterwards...lol... I would get toothpaste on a sting, spirits of violets on cold sores. Used tea bags will also help to stop swelling.

We are not native american by heritage.



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: misskat1

If anyone is interested, Ive been saving herbal information on a little blog. Its just for friends and family who are wanting to identify wild herbs, there are a few recipes too. Keep in mind its a work in progress and Im a little embarrassed to share, but I think learning the local medicinals might save some lives one day.

geoglyphs.wordpress.com...

edit on 17-11-2015 by misskat1 because: fixed link



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: misskat1

misskat1 - you add so much to the threads you take part in. Just wanted you to know. Sorry for going off topic everyone.



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Awesome post! THANK YOU!!! We need to get back to the basics.



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 10:44 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Alfalfa is also a great cleanser with vitamin c content.

Viburnum or high bush cranberry is cramp bark, and it works great.

Raspberry leaves that have changed into their fall colors and dry on the plant are especially helpful for women's issues.

The plantain is great as a field remedy since it's so common. Smoosh them up and apply directly to any kind of bug bite for relief. I actually make a salve with the beeswax and used plantain fireweed and wild chamomile this season instead of store bought essential oils. It works a little better than previous batches, it just doesn't smell as good.

Wild violets leaves are super high in vitamin c content, they rival rosehips.

Thanks for this!! Nature provides us with what we need if only we know where to look!



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: DAVID64
LOL yeah, but here in MI we don't have those growing in my yard.

@ misskat, don't be embarrassed! Great information! Thank you.



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 11:02 AM
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For all the good information out there remember there is also bad info along with many people who simply copy things they find on other websites.

The Peterson's Field Guide To Wild Medicinal plants is a great resource to have on hand just to make sure you not only have the right plant but are using the right part in the right manner.

Green Dean of Eat the Weeds is probably the best authority on the web.
However it never hurts to double check before using any plant you aren't familiar with.



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 11:21 AM
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Replying to save. Thank you.
But how do you access threads that you have saved from say a year ago. I seem to only be able to find thread that I have contributed to or subscribe for a while and then poof gone.



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 12:37 PM
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When I went up to Maine they drank this thing called fire cider. People swore by it for its uses. It contained apple cider vinegar, ginger, garlic, cayenne pepper, turmeric, Ect. It tastes horrible taking shots every day and I has to tell people( myself living in Nola) that they should cook with these herbs and spices, makes food taste great and is good for you. The problem is most people don't cook for themselves or know these useful herbs



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Many of those are used in modern medicine, they just call it different names.

Not all medicine is synthetic, far from...

Here is Aloe vera.

SOURCE

Bee pollen.

SOURCE 2
edit on 17-11-2015 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 01:19 PM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
Honey for birth control. Squeezed up yonder with a buffalo bladder. The pope wouldn't promote the practice.


...dang.



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 01:34 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

My grandmother and mother were both herbalists and they used these as well as many more natural treatments and cures for almost anything that ails a person.

One of my favorites was a "preparation" which they had for internal paracites. It involved corn liquer and black walnut hulls. The hulls gave the liquer a good "earthy" flavour.

Of course, grandpa claimed to have worms for a very long time.




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