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I don't comprehend the strategic value of IS attacking outside their boarders.

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posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 01:38 PM
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I don't comprehend the strategic value of IS attacking outside their boarders.


Their goal is to bring about the downfall of our liberal societies. They believe the many large Muslim enclaves dotted around Europe and Britain gives them access to acolytes who will join in the jihad, bringing about death and destruction and turmoil onto the streets.

Self-martyrdom is seen as a honourable act when it is used to kill so-called infidels, and there can be no greater honour than to kill them in the heart of their own cities as you suicide yourself for your God.

The problem is, IS is not physical, it is an idea, and although you can kill the carrier of the idea, to truly defeat IS, you have to kill it as an idea. This is where Muslims who do not accept IS have to play a part, because they carry the idea of Islam as a religion of peace, not one of militancy and death. With IS, Muslims are at war with themselves and the West is caught up in it through our foreign policies, our meddling, and our agendas.




posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 01:41 PM
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a reply to: FlyingFox


You want to know why ISIS is so self destructive

Maybe their created zombies used by the West for sinister geopolitical reasons

Just ask yourself this: amazing how 30 thousand ISIS fighters have brought the Western world to a state of siege?

A relatively small band of criminal religious gangsters…

And you’re telling me that this is not by design

Not another Operation Gladio in operation
www.truthmove.org...
jV6ThumhLyc


Look at the number of troops all these countries have in their armies, probably comes to millions of men, and this is all not just some kind of massive black operation

This is not some kind of GLADIATOR SHOW

Some sadistic NWO sacrifice ritual of mass murder and mayhem the PTB are letting happen, for whatever sick reason.

When are we going to wake up and demand these depraved “leaders” do the right thing?



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 01:44 PM
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One objective of terrorism is to force the larger power into repressive actions which will ultimately further the cause of the combatants by bringing more and more people to their side.



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 08:00 PM
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See, I believe IS had reached a critical mass of proto-statehood. This makes many of the actions out of the terrorist playbook are counter-productive. Shouldn't it be a recruiting tool itself, that they have established a Caliphate?

But yes, black is white, up is down, good is evil. They hate us for our freedom.
edit on 15-11-2015 by FlyingFox because: freedom



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 08:15 PM
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a reply to: FlyingFox

Shouldn't it be a recruiting tool itself, that they have established a Caliphate?
Have they though? What is a Caliphate? While they do control a few (scattered) locations through armed might, and they do have an economy (if you consider thievery to be the base of an economy), what is that? Do they have a government of any sort?



They hate us for our freedom.
Among other things.



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 08:27 PM
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The reason for launching attacks away from the area has actual value on several levels. When one goes off to fight a war, unless you are sitting there in the general area, most of the time it is always in a faraway part of the world. Many of the civilian population never sees the horror or the devastation that is wrought in a conflict. And there are rules to any conflict, one being that the population has to support said actions. So as a means to stop such, and to demoralize the enemy you either harass them on the field, or you strike where it is going to put more pressure on the actual soldier and the government in their home land.

By striking at civilian targets, one starts to cause fear and panic in that homeland, kind of makes a government think twice about striking at another. It is a gambit, and a statement, one that says we can inflict damage on you, even where you sleep. Think about it, you are a soldier, or a government official, thinking you are safe, and then there is one coordinated attack, how shaken would you be? It causes more problems than help. Combine that with a large number of refugees and people passing through and now you accomplish with one action, what none could, pure terror on the local population. Now that government official is forced to decide on a military strike, while having to fend off political attacks.

Make no mistake, this was a message, and it was sent not only to France, but all of Europe, that now ISIS can strike anytime anywhere, even in their own homelands. So now here is the downside and the saddest part of all. They will have to decide on 2 things, if they are going to join in the fray and try to take out ISIS, what to do with the refugee’s and if they will continue to take more refugee’s from that area. And politically and on the world stage, they are in a precarious position, cause any way they move could back fire on them.



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 08:30 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
Have they though? What is a Caliphate?


they have to their own satisfaction, and it is an immensely powerful recruitment tool.

www.theatlantic.com...


While they do control a few (scattered) locations through armed might,


if by a few scattered locations, you mean a territory roughly the size of the u.k., then yes.


and they do have an economy (if you consider thievery to be the base of an economy), what is that?


somebody's buying the oil...


Do they have a government of any sort?


they do, or did anyway, complete with courts and regulating bodies.

www.cnn.com...




posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 08:33 PM
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a reply to: ATODASO

they have to their own satisfaction, and it is an immensely powerful recruitment tool.
Self proclaimed. A legend in their own mind?



if by a few scattered locations, you mean a territory roughly the size of the u.k., then yes.
No. They don't control the region. They control cities within the region.


somebody's buying the oil...
In all likelihood, you are. Mine though, comes from elsewhere. Not that it's relevant.



they do, or did anyway, complete with courts and regulating bodies.
Well, ok then.


edit on 11/15/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 08:38 PM
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Wars have a funny way of slipping out of borders. Not sure what else I can tell you. We are at war. And war and what's been happening in Africa and the ME is A-okay with most people until the war comes knocking on their front door. This is not a hard concept, people. Calling it terrorism when it escapes some preordained border is intellectually dishonest, isn't it?
edit on 11/15/2015 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 08:49 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: ATODASO
Self proclaimed. A legend in their own mind?


it only has to be effective with the target audience.


Tens of thousands of foreign Muslims are thought to have immigrated to the Islamic State. Recruits hail from France, the United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, Holland, Australia, Indonesia, the United States, and many other places. Many have come to fight, and many intend to die.

Peter R. Neumann, a professor at King’s College London, told me that online voices have been essential to spreading propaganda and ensuring that newcomers know what to believe. Online recruitment has also widened the demographics of the jihadist community, by allowing conservative Muslim women—physically isolated in their homes—to reach out to recruiters, radicalize, and arrange passage to Syria. Through its appeals to both genders, the Islamic State hopes to build a complete society.

www.theatlantic.com...




No. They don't control the region. They control cities within the region.


and move freely between the cities, and receive cooperation/lack of resistance from the rural population. so, yeah, "control" is the mot juste.




In all likelihood, you are. Mine though, comes from elsewhere. Not that it's relevant.





edit on 15-11-2015 by ATODASO because: is that better, bud?



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 09:09 PM
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originally posted by: ManBehindTheMask
You have to remember one of the main goals is to bring about the coming of the 12th imam, that can only be done if there is "Armageddon" that requires them to pull off of the major powers into conflict , and draw them into combat at their designated arena

That's a huge influence on the why


Isn't that more a Shia thing? It does seem Daeesh is pretty apocalyptic just not in the 12th Iman style.

They do seem to want to take on everyone a the same time. I give them props for pouring gasoline on the fire, even if its ultimately suicidal. Two big questions I have are:

1. Why hasn't anyone taken out their revenue generating ability? That would be their oil and Gulf money.

2. Where is Daeesh getting their arms? You have to assume we and Russia and the Kurda are taking out a good chunk of hardware. Where are they replacing it and who is doing it? On a simpler matter, where are they just even getting their munitions and small arms? We are talking a significant force at a minimum 15,000 probably double that, thats a lot of weapons and logistics.



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 09:10 PM
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They are thinking that by attacking inside the countries bombing them..............they will force the governments to flee ME and stop bombing them.

When a suicide bomber blew his truck in Lebanon in early 1980s killing 200+ American soldiers, then Ronald Reagan immediately withdrew all the US troops.

ISIS is thinking on same lines. They want outsiders to go away and left will be impotent Iraqis and civil war exhausted Syrians. That is why they bombed Russian plane and also issued threat to attacks inside Russia.

Fanatic Morons forgot that 1980s was more than 35 years ago. Technologies have come far more advanced than the "donkey riders" wielding AKs and shouting religious nonsense.



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 09:18 PM
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originally posted by: pavil


1. Why hasn't anyone taken out their revenue generating ability? That would be their oil and Gulf money.
.


The pentagon has just announced that U.S. airstikes have significantly degraded their oil producing capacity. One article said 75 percent out of commission.
edit on 15-11-2015 by DelMarvel because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: ATODASO

Fair enough...all.

Except for that last picture. I don't like it.

What I meant was, my gasoline and oil don't come from the Middle East.



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 09:40 PM
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a reply to: DelMarvel

The reports I just read talk about oil fields in Syria. Isn't Mosul the Iraq oil center in the north? Have they gone after that as well? Why did it take a year to do that? We could have done that in a day if we really wanted to. The obvious conclusion is that we really didn't want to cripple their income initially. Shame on us for that.



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 09:58 PM
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originally posted by: DelMarvel

originally posted by: pavil


1. Why hasn't anyone taken out their revenue generating ability? That would be their oil and Gulf money.
.


The pentagon has just announced that U.S. airstikes have significantly degraded their oil producing capacity. One article said 75 percent out of commission.


I asked the same question around a week ago and answer was these were Iraqi refineries so cannot be bombed. Now after Paris, everyone is bombing them.

Why not cutoff all lines of entry and exit to Raqqaa where ISIS is in a strong hold. That alone will choke their supply lines and then involve them in "out of range" firefight and that will use up their weapons and ammo. I bet very soon there will be a mini civil war inside that city between those who want to surrender and those who want to meet 70 virgins.



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 10:09 PM
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a reply to: pavil




2. Where is Daeesh getting their arms? You have to assume we and Russia and the Kurda are taking out a good chunk of hardware. Where are they replacing it and who is doing it? On a simpler matter, where are they just even getting their munitions and small arms? We are talking a significant force at a minimum 15,000 probably double that, thats a lot of weapons and logistics.


Funded by Saudi, UAE, Qatar and funneled through Turkey...........both weapons and fighters. This is mainly Shia vrs Sunni fight with US wanting Assad out to weaken Russian foothold in ME and then export Sunni Jihad in Southern Russia.



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 11:27 PM
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originally posted by: FlyingFox
See, I believe IS had reached a critical mass of proto-statehood. This makes many of the actions out of the terrorist playbook are counter-productive. Shouldn't it be a recruiting tool itself, that they have established a Caliphate?

But yes, black is white, up is down, good is evil. They hate us for our freedom.


Don't buy too much into the "Caliphate" angle. That's just their marketing approach. Kind of like how a new sports beverage will advertise itself as "the best", "the greatest", "far tastier", "way better than the others", etc (and yeah, I said "far tastier" lol. i can't imagine a company saying that about a drink but you get the point).

It's also better to think of them more as a gang with "turf" instead of as a "state with borders". Most of the civilians living in their turf are more like hostages than "citizens". And there are plenty of accounts online about people who go to join their "state", only to be giving a gun and immediately sent to the front lines to kill or be killed.



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 01:40 AM
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I guess we can say the intent is to provoke a reaction, as well as to give aggressor states a taste of their own medicine.

I still feel the alternative strategy of IS, to focus on internal issues, would better suit their long term interests.



posted on Nov, 19 2015 @ 01:45 AM
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a reply to: FlyingFox




I still feel the alternative strategy of IS, to focus on internal issues, would better suit their long term interests.

That's sort of the problem it would seem. Their long term interests. Right now it seems to be conquest of the middle east. Internal issues generally take a back seat in that situation.



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