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Thank you vets! Do you know any?

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posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 06:49 AM
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We may not always like how our government uses our military, and likely that will continue. But that has never dampened my support of the people putting their lives in harms way in the line of duty.

I would like to say thank you for the burdens and sacrifices you have made.


My dad was a Korean War vet serving in country in 1952 till the end in 1953. He saw some bad stuff.
He is also the reason I never joined after high school. He said the family has seen enough death and his sons can skip a generation. Can't say I blame him.

I also had two uncles in Germany during ww2 and one in Vietnam.
All of them came home, guess gramma was a lucky woman.

My father in law was drafted during Vietnam but was stationed in Michigan as a jet engine mechanic on b52's. He got drafted and could drive home on a two day pass, not a bad assignment huh?

Anyways, tell us about your vets...




posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 07:04 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

Many in my family have died for their country. Most all have served. We are not a rich family so we fight in the nations wars disproportionately like many low income families have. I served in the Army Infantry. Every man in my family served just about. Some of our women served as well.



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 07:27 AM
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My paternal grandfather served in WWII, Korea and 2 tours in Vietnam. He never spoke about any of it. My maternal grandfather, who I never met, served in WWII also, not sure which ship he served on, but I have heard that he spoke of the raging fires and watching his fellows burn to death. My father was enlisted in the Army during Vietnam but ended up stationed in Germany, avoiding the conflict. And then there is my high school history teacher, who taught a special course about Vietnam. He made a huge and lasting impression on me, and countless other students. He had others vets speak to us, had us interview and write about a vet, and educated us pretty well about the conflict. The last day of class he would share some personal stories, and I will never forget that.

Thank you to all who have and do serve! Hugs to all!



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 07:44 AM
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Thanks for the thanks...lol
US Army 1987-1993 Combat Engineer



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 08:00 AM
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a reply to: machineintelligence




Many in my family have died for their country.


I dont mean disrespect but can you tell me one war that wasn't about plundering and economic profiteering.

I am tired of people saying "....died for their country", people are sent to wars because they are indoctrinated to think its about self defense or to protect their "way of life", when nothing could be further for the truth.



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 08:01 AM
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Grandfather -WW2 Germany
2 of grandfather's brothers- Germany , 1 in the battle of Bastogne - wounded refused to leave the fight (I have his purple heart )
Friend's father - served with Patton's 3rd army from Sicily to the end
Dad - Korean War 101st Airborne Screamin Eagle (no I did not say Pukin Buzzard)
Nephew - killed in Iraq

Thanks one and all for your service no matter when or how....



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 08:13 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

My family has shed blood in every war America has fought so pick one.



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 08:15 AM
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Gramps, USMC, 1944-1964, WW2, Korea, Vietnam
His brother, USAAC/USAF, 1943-1968, WW2, Korea, Vietnam
Other Gramps, 1941-1946, rode with Patton in Africa, Italy, and Europe
Two cousins, late 80s to early 90s, Gulf War
Me, 01-08, GWOT/OIF



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 08:18 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

I'm tired of people saying "no disrespect" when they really mean "I'm about to say something disrespectful."

Call a spade a spade.



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 08:21 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight


Please keep the politics out of this thread. Not everybody shares your opinion.
Let us honor the people we are proud of without feeling the need to defend their service.
I would be more than happy to discuss your thoughts on the subject but not on this thread.



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 08:28 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

My family fought in the revolutionary war, both sides, the war of 1812 both sides, the Spanish war on the US side, the Barbary pirates on the US side, the civil war on both sides, the first world on the US side, the second world war on the US side, the Korean conflict on the US side and the Vietnam conflict on the US side, the first Iraq war, the second Iraq war the current conflicts, on the US side. You get the picture. If there is a war my family shed their blood in it if the US was involved. We currently have about a dozen active duty.



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 08:50 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

Not everyone shares my opinion fine; what I find amusing is the denial by those that lost loved ones that they were mere pawns in furthering some economic gain - calling it dying for a flag is obfuscation.

The same type of thinking doesnt allow for critical thinking, and more fodder is sent to war. If more people questioned why the waste of human life governments would be left without soldiers to do their bidding. It has to stop sometime - even while we write on these boards millions of others have paid the price of being on the receiving end of some military/corporate incursion on their land.

The term " died for their country " is a political statement-



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 08:54 AM
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a reply to: machineintelligence

Out of all those wars that your family fought in could you enlighten me as to how many people they killed?



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 09:04 AM
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You are welcome



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 09:05 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

We lost 24 I know of. How many they killed is hard to say. Likely it was more than we lost since many of ours were combat arms folks like myself. I have no idea how many I have killed since I was indirect fire infantry.



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 09:07 AM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

Wars are often, perhaps always, fought for political aims and often times those political aims include resources. What an earth shattering revelation.

What I find amusing is when people say that as if it's some kind of mind-blowing piece of information, and then they sit back with a smug look on their face as if they were the first ones to think of it. And they're so self-centered and self-righteous about it they'll bring it up whenever they can, as often as they can, even when nobody asked them.

Much like now.



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

A large percentage of both my natural and "adoptive" families have served in official capacity....as well as a lot of my friends. I would name them all with branches accordingly but we'd be here for a very, very, very long time.

I'd like to thank my Father and Step Dad, in particular....for raising me right and well in accordance with a high degree of personal responsibility and accountability, self reliance and respect towards others in all capacities and walks of life.

I'd also like to thank all Veterans and current enlisted, for being awesome and badass at protecting the innocent and less formidable. You are wonderful people, and may Peace prevail one day that our efforts may not have been for naught.

HAPPY VETERANS DAY!



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

I found your title intriguing and an interesting testament to the DRAFT. Used to be that everyone knew a Vet because the military was made up of, often barely willing, citizen soldiers. Soldiers, other then the officer class, rarely considered this service as a career or profession as they do today, but as a duty, a responsibility of citizenship.

My father served in WWII (silver and bronze stars), Korean and Vietnam as a careerist. He never, never wanted to be lauded or idealized, in fact he hated such empty sentimentality and would say that everyone is required to serve in some capacity. Vote, pay your taxes, serve on committees.... be in action and set an example rather then twitter about what others should do.



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 10:48 AM
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a reply to: FyreByrd


My dad was the same way. He didn't like to talk about his experiences.
I have found that many of the Gung ho types never saw any action.
Just an observation from my dealings with vets.



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 12:30 PM
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I work with a gentleman who was in Iraq (usmc). His legs (terrible scars) were severely injured when a bomb of some sort exploded under or near their vehicle.
My sister and her S.O. were both nurses. My sister was a civilian nurse at Dewitt (I think it was called) and later became Ft. Belvoir. I am pretty sure her first nursing job was there when it opened...maybe around 57 or 58. She is 81 now. She delivered the babies of the enlisted.
Her S.O was an Army nurse. She became a nurse around the end of the Vietnam war.
Both of my brothers have served.
My youngest (57) was a radar tech on the awacs. During the Iran hostage ordeal. I remember there was a "black out" during that time and there was no contact for a while. I remember Mom crying and just fretting...
My older one served on a sub for many many years...he then went on to Idaho and taught for awhile...
I think he was on the sub (off and on you know) for maybe 9 or 10 years! I can't imagine!

Various uncles, cousins, etc. all branches.

I, too, salute their sacrifices!




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