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Burn Cheap CPU's at Home Using BluRay Burning Technology. TWO DOLLARS for 35 CPU's!

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posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 12:45 AM
link   
a reply to: yuppa

This type of write-once circuitry making system
Can have almost any type of digital logic
embedded INCLUDING ram, VIDEO graphics and audio processing, usb and serial communications,
TCP/UDP IP Network coomunications, dsp, etc.

Even high frequency clocks, software defined
radios with built-in antennae...AND...we can even
Add in analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog
converters with some extra work!

An ENTIRE computing system or a smartphone
can be written to a BluRay-like disc! One of my
colleagues even suggested creating and selling
stamped square or rectangular pre-fab plastic slices at common Cpu/gpu/dsp packaging sizes
for maximum Compatibility to current silicon chip
packaging sizes for inclusion into today's
consumer electronics.

With sufficient research it is possible to CHEAPLY
Burn-in flexible high resolution displays into the
Circiut diagram !!!

Think custom home printed smartphone with
35 Intel i7 equivalent CPU chips built-in !!!

With modern BluRay technology now being able
To focus down up to ten layers deep, multi-layer
Electronic circuits can now be be BURNED into
Prefabbed Write-once discs or rectangular slices.

With ultraviolet lasers and newer 30-layer beam
Focusing technology, THOUSANDS of
CPU/GPU/DSP cores could be burned into
Plastic chips using nothing more than laser
Based chip burners and cheap app-store
Or open source Downloaded Chip designs
and home cpu burning software.

One team in Germany burned a 100-core RISC
chip design on a thick credit card sized plastic
substrate needing only 8 layers. It ran at
Only 750 MHZ But the clock speed was
easily scalable.

WOW!!!

Talk about having a supercomputer in your hand!
edit on 2015/11/10 by StargateSG7 because: sp




posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 01:31 AM
link   
a reply to: StargateSG7

...oops a math mistake in an earlier post...

it should be noted that you can fit 25 BILLION
(not my earlier stated measly 25 Million)
P-N junction Wells or pits on a single layer
of an 8600 square Millimetre BluRay CPU disc!
THAT gives you 250 Billion P-N junctions
To work with over ten layers! It can take
Between 4 to 16 junctions to make one
Transistor / logic gate, so 60 BILLION
Transistor count CPU/GPU/DSP designs
are not out of the realm of possibility on
a SINGLE ten-layer burnable CPU disc !!!

So, just to re-iterate, it is NO PROBLEM AT ALL
to fit MULTIPLE 1.6 to 2.5 Billion transistor
Count Intel i7-equivalent CPU designs
on the TOTAL 86,000 Square Millimetre
Available area of a ten layer burnable CPU/GPU/DSP disc.

CAPICHE?!

edit on 2015/11/10 by StargateSG7 because: sp



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 01:58 AM
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What about making a working prototype before getting investors to fork out a few million? Then you could sell the whole thing for a few billion.



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 03:16 AM
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a reply to: StargateSG7

funny thing im watchin stargate right now, about time some1 came up with this.
sf



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 05:24 AM
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a reply to: StargateSG7

Hehehe...



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 06:00 AM
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I'm wondering what the NSA, FBI, and other alphabet agencies are using to store data, something we wont hear about for another 20 years I'll bet...



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 06:47 AM
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OP from your link at phys.org:
Article

Since it is on a plastic substrate, the prototype CPU can be bent. It is powered by +3.3V and has an operating frequency range of 13MHz. The laboratory says the CPU was realized by transcribing onto the plastic substrate a low-temperature p-Si TFT. Read more at: phys.org...


Now just because the prototype runs at 13mhz doesn't mean a more refined, improved version couldn't run faster. But I doubt you could even approach 1ghz with this tech without melting the plastic. That's not a big deal though - if you could get even 100mhz or 200mhz out of it, it would be incredibly valuable for home built systems and education.

Imagine if someone made a software that taught you how to design your own processor and motherboard. Then you had a printer that you fed plastic film into that could print out your design. If you could put memory and storage on it, then you could learn how to build and program your own little computer from the ground up all at home. The educational value and hobbyist value would be priceless.

Again the numbers provided by the OP are greatly exaggerated, and I think it would have trouble running anything more complex than DOS, but I like the concept.



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 06:56 AM
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originally posted by: peskyhumans
OP from your link at phys.org:

Now just because the prototype runs at 13mhz doesn't mean a more refined, improved version couldn't run faster. But I doubt you could even approach 1ghz with this tech without melting the plastic.


They didn't do that with a bluray writer. It was vapor deposited onto the plastic, masked, doped etc like any other transistor, they're just doing it on a plastic substrate.



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 07:02 AM
link   

originally posted by: peskyhumans
Imagine if someone made a software that taught you how to design your own processor and motherboard. Then you had a printer that you fed plastic film into that could print out your design. If you could put memory and storage on it, then you could learn how to build and program your own little computer from the ground up all at home. The educational value and hobbyist value would be priceless.


It's existed for decades. It's called an FPGA. The software won't teach you how to design anything, though, that's up to you to learn. And there's a lot of learning curve, which you generally get with a EE degree.

That said, you can buy all the bits and pieces from places like Digikey, which will happily provide you with very nice little FPGA development kits and free development software. If you're really good with VHDL, you can write your own little ARM CPU, no problems.



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 07:05 AM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam

But I don't see how using Blurays instead of plastic film would improve the functionality at all. You guys seem to think Blurays are made of pixie dust and will improve the functionality of any electronics printed on them by like 1000% for some reason.

They could use anything as the backboard. Fiberglass, plastic, blurays. What matters is the tech used to make the circuits, not the backboard.

IMO Blurays wouldn't be a good choice because they are circles with holes in them. It would be better to use a film that you could feed through a printer which you could sell as a DIY device - sort of like the 3D printer craze.

* Didn't know about FPGA's. They look complicated though. I still think something more user friendly and educational combined with the novelty and affordability of printing out your own boards would be nice.
edit on 11/10/15 by peskyhumans because: edit



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 07:12 AM
link   

originally posted by: peskyhumans
a reply to: Bedlam

But I don't see how using Blurays instead of plastic film would improve the functionality at all.


It wouldn't - the OP's conjecture has more holes than a Swiss cheese. I'm talking about an FPGA, not a blu-ray.

Or for your post where you cited the plastic film device, I was pretty explicit in stating that it was a gimmick, and was fabricated using standard techniques.

You're preaching to the choir.



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 07:20 AM
link   

originally posted by: StargateSG7
This type of write-once circuitry making system
Can have almost any type of digital logic
embedded INCLUDING ram, VIDEO graphics and audio processing, usb and serial communications,
TCP/UDP IP Network coomunications, dsp, etc.

Even high frequency clocks, software defined
radios with built-in antennae...AND...we can even
Add in analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog
converters with some extra work!

An ENTIRE computing system or a smartphone
can be written to a BluRay-like disc! One of my
colleagues even suggested creating and selling
stamped square or rectangular pre-fab plastic slices at common Cpu/gpu/dsp packaging sizes
for maximum Compatibility to current silicon chip
packaging sizes for inclusion into today's
consumer electronics.

With sufficient research it is possible to CHEAPLY
Burn-in flexible high resolution displays into the
Circiut diagram !!!

Think custom home printed smartphone with
35 Intel i7 equivalent CPU chips built-in !!!

With modern BluRay technology now being able
To focus down up to ten layers deep, multi-layer
Electronic circuits can now be be BURNED into
Prefabbed Write-once discs or rectangular slices.

With ultraviolet lasers and newer 30-layer beam
Focusing technology, THOUSANDS of
CPU/GPU/DSP cores could be burned into
Plastic chips using nothing more than laser
Based chip burners and cheap app-store
Or open source Downloaded Chip designs
and home cpu burning software.

One team in Germany burned a 100-core RISC
chip design on a thick credit card sized plastic
substrate needing only 8 layers. It ran at
Only 750 MHZ But the clock speed was
easily scalable.

WOW!!!

Talk about having a supercomputer in your hand!


The science here goes way over my head, assuming what you claim is possible.
If it's that easy to print all those different specs, once you got everything setup, why not make an ultimate all-in-one computer/phone/radio/you-name-it machine at the most fast and powerful setting available?
Then people wouldn't need dozens of different appliances anymore and upgrade it every couple of months, like now with slight increments in hardware only to milk the consumer market.



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 07:21 AM
link   

originally posted by: peskyhumans
They could use anything as the backboard. Fiberglass, plastic, blurays. What matters is the tech used to make the circuits, not the backboard.


Don't confuse the circuitry with the devices. It's not going to be possible to print semiconductors on a tabletop with ANY substrate any time soon.

FPGAs are your best bet for desktop fab of working CPU devices. It IS complex, because CPU design is complex. Semiconductor design is complex. Device design is complex. Printed circuit design and routing is complex. The peripherals are complex. The drivers are complex. It's not like you can Fisher-Price your way to a motherboard that can boot DOS or run Windows.

Most home hobbyists aren't even very good at soldering. It's asking a lot for someone to read a 10 page help file and pop out even something as piss-simple as a Raspberry Pi PCB, much less say "here's a sea of gates, gen yourself up an Nvidia graphics chip, then design the board it goes on, then fabricate it, then assemble it, then write the sw for it".

CSB: we did a lot of consulting work on the BIOS and some of the hardware for Nvidia's first core logic/graphics parts, they DID have the thing implemented in a big sea of horribly expensive top end Xilinx parts on a development system that was so rickety we were having to pull the ROM out while it was powered up, because it took so long to reload if you had to power it down. And it wasn't a given it would start for any reload.
edit on 10-11-2015 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 07:31 AM
link   
a reply to: AmericanRealist

Send me your money instead. Seems like you have more money than sense.



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 07:34 AM
link   
a reply to: Bedlam

Thanks for clearing that up! I gave you some stars for being so patient with me.



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 07:50 AM
link   

originally posted by: peskyhumans
a reply to: Bedlam

Thanks for clearing that up! I gave you some stars for being so patient with me.


It's one of my main work areas. I've thought about doing a long long thread where I do a design from ground zero to board debug, so people see what it entails. If you go all the way back to semi-custom fab and work your way to a board, it's a real butt pain. It would be the thread that never ends.



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 08:04 AM
link   
mmm, considering what's happening with open source 3d printing I'd bet that this would penetrate the market much better than fpgas or arduino, consider the opportunity of selling the blueprints rather than the chips.
So, if this tech is going anywhere






posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 10:55 AM
link   
a reply to: peskyhumans

The substrate used in the physics.org article
Were creating FLEXIBLE electronics which
Requires a softer plastic.

Polycarbonate is quite a bit tougher
And just do the math to get maximum
possible thermal absorption and/or
Permissitivy/diffusion values over
A cubic or planar area.

10 GHZ has ALREADY BEEN DONE !!!

We may have to goto a high heat resistant
Formulation ( some plastics have melting
Points as high as 350 celcius!)

Sooooo, my article is NOT so exaggerated
After al.... !!!!
edit on 2015/11/10 by StargateSG7 because: sp



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 11:04 AM
link   
a reply to: StargateSG7
Thanks for sharing your wisdom!!!!





posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 01:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: peskyhumans
They could use anything as the backboard. Fiberglass, plastic, blurays. What matters is the tech used to make the circuits, not the backboard.


Don't confuse the circuitry with the devices. It's not going to be possible to print semiconductors on a tabletop with ANY substrate any time soon.

FPGAs are your best bet for desktop fab of working CPU devices. It IS complex, because CPU design is complex. Semiconductor design is complex. Device design is complex. Printed circuit design and routing is complex. The peripherals are complex. The drivers are complex. It's not like you can Fisher-Price your way to a motherboard that can boot DOS or run Windows.

Most home hobbyists aren't even very good at soldering. It's asking a lot for someone to read a 10 page help file and pop out even something as piss-simple as a Raspberry Pi PCB, much less say "here's a sea of gates, gen yourself up an Nvidia graphics chip, then design the board it goes on, then fabricate it, then assemble it, then write the sw for it".

CSB: we did a lot of consulting work on the BIOS and some of the hardware for Nvidia's first core logic/graphics parts, they DID have the thing implemented in a big sea of horribly expensive top end Xilinx parts on a development system that was so rickety we were having to pull the ROM out while it was powered up, because it took so long to reload if you had to power it down. And it wasn't a given it would start for any reload.


---

This is why you have Silicon Compilers!

The FPGA-based ones we buy from Mentor Graphics and other are like $500,000 and UP!

but the one our company has designed takes into account substrates,
active microchannel cooling, even giving hints, tips and tricks ...AND...
has pre-built BIOS and driver code templates for Silicon COmpiler hardware
outputed designs. (i.e. automatically created full BIOS and Drivers for a
Tape Out CPU/GPU/DSP design!)

The key is making it as easy as using DVD burning software!

Pick and download your app store-bought or open source
CPU/GPU/DSP hardware design VHDL scripts and have the
Silicon Compiler VHDL scrip Reader output a proper
BIOS and Peripheral driver based upon some tick boxes
and pre-built templates.

With the Silicon Compiler technology that we have (i.e. MidGrid)
combined with flexible plastic substrates that can be written using
BluRay-like burning peripherals I expect a full home-based CPU/GPU/DSP
burning system to be less than $1000 within 5 years!

---

In terms of SPEED, here are some links to GigaHertz+ operation
of electronic circuits on plastic and other flexible substrates:


25 GHZ Circuits on Flexible Plastic

Researchers at the University of Texas fabricate record-breaking
25GHz graphene transistors printed on flexible plastic

21 Aug 2013 | Editor

Professor Deji Akinwande and University of Texas materials
scientist Rodney Ruoff have published, in the journal ACS Nano,
their recent work on fabricating "record-breaking" 25-gigahertz
graphene transistors printed on flexible plastic.

For Bluetooth communications transistor circuits have to be
able to switch on and off billions of times per second—2.4 GHz
to be exact, and about 1 GHz for cellular communications.
However for practical applications, the transistors in these
circuits have to be rated about 10 times faster than that,
says Prof. Deji Akinwande.


www.osadirect.com...

25 GHz Embedded-Gate Graphene Transistors with High-K Dielectrics on Extremely Flexible Plastic Sheets

by

Jongho Lee
Tae-Jun Ha
Huifeng Li
Kristen N. Parrish
Milo Holt
Ananth Dodabalapur
Rodney S. Ruoff
Deji Akinwande

ACS Nano, Article ASAP | DOI: 10.1021/nn403487y | Publication Date (Web): August 13, 2013

----

7.8-GHz flexible thin-film transistors on a low-temperature plastic substrate

by

Hao-Chih Yuan1, George K. Celler2 and Zhenqiang Ma3,a)

scitation.aip.org...

----

High-performance green flexible electronics based on biodegradable cellulose nanofibril paper
(up to 10 GHZ high frequency electronics ON PAPER substrate not just plastic!)

by

Yei Hwan Jung, Tzu-Hsuan Chang,
Huilong Zhang, Chunhua Yao,
Qifeng Zheng, Vina W. Yang,
Hongyi Mi, Munho Kim,
Sang June Cho, Dong-Wook Park,
Hao Jiang, Juhwan Lee,
Yijie Qiu, Weidong Zhou,
Zhiyong Cai, Shaoqin Gong
& Zhenqiang Ma

www.nature.com...

----

APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS 88, 183509 2006

Gigahertz operation in flexible transistors on plastic substrates
by
Yugang Sun, Etienne Menard, and John A. Rogersa,
Department of Materials Science and Engineering and
Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory,
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801
Hoon-Sik Kim, Seiyon Kim, Guang Chen, and Ilesanmi Adesida

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and
Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, University
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801
Ross Dettmer,a,c Rebecca Cortez, and Alan Tewksbury

Sensors Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory,
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433
Received 4 January 2006; accepted 29 March 2006;
published online 5 May 2006

The combined use of GaAs wires with Ohmic contacts
formed from bulk wafers, soft lithographic transfer
printing techniques, and optimized device designs
enables mechanically flexible transistors to be
formed on low-cost plastic substrates, with
individual device speeds in the gigahertz range
and with high degrees of mechanical bendability.
These high-speed devices incorporate materials in
simple layouts that can be fabricated with modest
lithographic patterning resolution and registration.
This letter describes their electrical and mechanical
characteristics. The results have the potential to
be important to certain large-area, “macroelectronic”
systems that can provide for high-speed communication
and processing capabilities.

© 2006 American Institute of Physics.

DOI: 10.1063/1.2198832

---

Faster Plastic Circuits (2005)

A new way to create high-quality silicon
components on plastic could make flexible
computing practical.

www.technologyreview.com...

100 MHZ was able to be done in 2005! Imagine in 2015 and future!

----
Transistor developed at UCLA significantly outperforms existing models
Advance could lead to more powerful wearable electronics and other devices

newsroom.ucla.edu...


----


edit on 2015/11/10 by StargateSG7 because: Spell Fixes




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