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Burn Cheap CPU's at Home Using BluRay Burning Technology. TWO DOLLARS for 35 CPU's!

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posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 06:27 PM
link   
Using modern CD-ROM-based Glass Master Stamping Technology and
pin-point accurate BluRay Disc Burning techniques, the AT-HOME
creation of cheap polycarbonate plastic discs containing arrays
of custom Intel Core i7 CPU or AMD/NVIDIA-equivalent GPU/DSP chips
running at over 7-GHZ is NOW POSSIBLE!

Using techniques borrowed from programmable logic manufacturing,
and home-based DVD/BluRay burning software, we can connect pre-built
electrical components embedded into multi-layer plastic discs to form
entire real-number and integer-processing logic blocks that can form
virtual CPU's equivalent in horsepower to a high-powered
Intel i7 CPU or an AMD/NVIDIA GPU.

Cheap glass masters can stamp nanometre-sized wells or pits that contain
pre-doped P-N Junctions that are connected together via pre-stamped
microwires on the horizontal axis and connected together in the vertical axis
on layers separated by non-conductive polycarbonate up to 10 layers deep!

The glass masters are created at the factory which STAMP the pre-arranged
P-N Junction wells/pits into plastic discs which are sold by the millions
to end users much like DVD-RW discs are today. It is the END-USER software
and BluRay writer which will BURN in the final pathways and connections
which create the final plastic CPU's and can take less than one hour to burn.

Those pre-stamped plastic discs can be sold to home users in bundles
of ten, 50 or 100 discs for a price not much more than TWO DOLLARS
a disc where end-users can then use logic burning software apps
that take pre-built CPU/GPU/DSP logic that gets combined
and then BURNED onto the plastic disc using a device similar
in function, size and price of a home BluRay burner (i.e. less than $300!).

When Blue Light Lasers (360 to 480 nanometres wavelength) and advanced
focusing mechanisms focus upon a specific pre-stamped P-N junction well
or pit in any given disc layer, the beam can be pulsed to blow apart any
given connection between the next or previous P-N junction well/pit,
or conversely, the laser can be set to pass over said well or pit thus keeping
any connection intact allowing the formation of a circuit pathway which
can then be arrayed in series to form adders, multipliers, boolean
logic and entire CPU/GPU/DSP logic blocks such as a floating point
or integer-processing or pixel-processing unit.

And since each P-N Junction can have their separator barrier
and/or charge carrier be made blue-light sensitive, it means
the individual junction can be forward or backwards biased by
the blue laser pulse so that electrical current flows in a
specific direction to form arrays of transistors which can
then form even more complex microcircuits if those P-N Junctions
are connected in series.

Since in-between layers can also contain arrays of electrical
charge storage wells, they can form cpu caches, cpu registers
or general purpose internal memory storage systems ... AND ...
in-between layers can contain pre-stamped microchannel-based
liquid cooling or air-cooling channels to allow fast heat transfer
and dissipation to allow much faster clock speeds as high
as 10 GHZ !!!

Current multi-layer BluRay disc beam technology allows
focusing of a laser between individual disc layers up to
10 layers deep at current 2015-era BluRay manufacturing
areal density of 25 billion individual P-N junction wells/pits
per layer or a grand total of 250 billion junctions over a
ten-layer disc. Using disc burning software, the various
combinations of electrical current directionality and
organization of individual memory cells into groups
on a 3D-XYZ stacked layering system can be set by the
end-user to allow the complexity of CPU circuits to approach
over 50 Billion transistors! It is NOW POSSIBLE to put the
equivalent of 35 Intel i7 Processors and Ten+ Gigabytes
of memory on ONE ten-layer CPU-disc!

If I stack those discs 100 high in ten stacks (a 2 x 4 foot box)
I could have the equivalent of 35,000 Intel i7 CPU’s and Terabytes+
of RAM memory on those disc stacks. And with the size of the circuits
being larger on an areal basis than today's silicon-substrates, I could
EMBED liquid-filled or air-based heat dissipation channels BETWEEN
each layer to allow MUCH faster cooling of circuitry through the
polycarbonate layers to allow a higher clock on the order of
between 7 to 10 Gigahertz!

Total cost of each disc using modern BluRay-based glass
master stamping and thin film vapor deposition of aluminum
microwire techniques and the mass-production growing of pre-doped
silicon crystals could allow manufacturing costs of BluRay-based
CPU discs to fall as low as $2 per 10-layer disc!

That means for less than $25, I could have up
to 350 of Intel i7 equivalent CPU's in a stack
only 10 Blu-ray discs high!

Since each 3.4 GHZ Intel i7 has about 120 Gigaflops
(i.e. 120 BILLION 64-bit Floating Point Operations Per Second)
worth of CPU horsepower, for ONLY $200,000 I could have a
massively parallel 7 GHZ, 700,000 CPU supercomputer that has
168,000 TERAFLOPS or 168 PETAFLOPS !!!! that’s five times
FASTER than today's fastest 34 petaflop Tianhe-2 supercomputer
which costs way over $100 MILLION+ !!!!!!

AND....if users wish to create single-purpose GPU (graphics processing units)
or DSP circuits (Digital Signal Processing), a hardware description language
(i.e. VHDL) can burn those specific logic circuit types using an easy-to-use
application similar to today’s DVD/BluRay burning software. Just assemble
pre-built virtual CPU cores and custom user-designed or app store-bought
CPU/GPU/DSP logic to create custom plastic circuits.

It would BLOW THE DOORS OFF today’s fastest supercomputers
all in a box not much more in size than a beer fridge!

These are the links to description of technologies that
support the creation of high-powered CPU/GPU/DSP's on
CHEAP Plastic CPU/GPU/DSP Substrates:


Explanation Graphic Page 1 of 2:





Explanation Graphic Page 2 of 2:




World's First CPU on Plastic Substrate:
phys.org...

Company that can make Flexible CPU/RFCPU Etched on Plastic:
www.sel.co.jp...

Flexible and tunable silicon photonic circuits on plastic substrates:
www.nature.com...

Compact Disc Manufacturing:
en.wikipedia.org...

Blue Laser Technology:
en.wikipedia.org...

Blue-Ray Disc technology:
en.wikipedia.org...

Programmable Logic:
en.wikipedia.org...

Field Programmable Gate Array:
en.wikipedia.org...

Logic Gates:
en.wikipedia.org...

VHDL (Virtual Hardware Description Language)
en.wikipedia.org...

Open Source RISC CPU:
en.wikipedia.org...

Open Source Hardware plans:
en.wikipedia.org...

Digital Signal Processing:
en.wikipedia.org...

GPU-oriented Stream Processing:
en.wikipedia.org...

Definition of FLOPS (Floating Point Operations Per Second)
which is a measure of available CPU horsepower:
en.wikipedia.org...

Fastest Supercomputer in World:
en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 2015/11/9 by StargateSG7 because: Spell Fixes

edit on 2015/11/9 by StargateSG7 because: Spell Fixes

edit on 2015/11/9 by StargateSG7 because: grammar fixes




posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 06:31 PM
link   
Wow, I need to learn more about this tech.

Thanks!



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 06:32 PM
link   
a reply to: StargateSG7

My take away.

Glass Masters for cheap lol.

Till when?

Snicker.




posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 06:46 PM
link   
Glass master stamping is initially done at the disc manufacturing factory!

The user just gets the final sold-by-the-bucket-load box
of END-USER BURNABLE plastic BluRay writeable
CPU/GPU/DSP discs!

It's very similar to the way DVD-R discs are created today!
CPU logic pre-built on plastic substrates that then use a
BluRay writer to burn-in a permanent connection between
arrays of pre-built P-N junctions to form virtual CPU's!

Similar silicon FPGA's (Field Programmable Gate Array)
can be over $1000.00 EACH !!!! This type of technology
can bring it down to TWO DOLLARS OR LESS !!!!! for
WAAAAAAY MORE CPU/GPU/DSP horsepower!
edit on 2015/11/9 by StargateSG7 because: sp

edit on 2015/11/9 by StargateSG7 because: Spell Fixes



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 07:13 PM
link   
sounds good.

have you ever ran a live operating system? from a cd or dvd? PAINFULLY SLOW. as these will be. cool none the less.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 07:30 PM
link   

originally posted by: benwyatt
sounds good.

have you ever ran a live operating system? from a cd or dvd? PAINFULLY SLOW. as these will be. cool none the less.


These discs don't spin --- They are JUST BURNED THAT WAY !!!!

When completed and hooked up via edge connectors to
an external display, they will be running at 10 GHZ !!!
That's three times faster than many Intel i7 CPU's !!!

Stack the discs a hundred high and you have a massively parallel
supercomputer that waaaaaay more powerful than today's
100 million dollar supers!

The spinning BluRay technology is merely used to BURN-IN
the final connections and soft-logic of a virtual CPU design.
Once completed you can run at FULL SPEED -- 10 GHZ!!!!!



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 07:46 PM
link   

originally posted by: StargateSG7

originally posted by: benwyatt
sounds good.

have you ever ran a live operating system? from a cd or dvd? PAINFULLY SLOW. as these will be. cool none the less.


These discs don't spin --- They are JUST BURNED THAT WAY !!!!

When completed and hooked up via edge connectors to
an external display, they will be running at 10 GHZ !!!
That's three times faster than many Intel i7 CPU's !!!

Stack the discs a hundred high and you have a massively parallel
supercomputer that waaaaaay more powerful than today's
100 million dollar supers!

The spinning BluRay technology is merely used to BURN-IN
the final connections and soft-logic of a virtual CPU design.
Once completed you can run at FULL SPEED -- 10 GHZ!!!!!


How thoroughly have these been tested? CPUs generate a lot of heat.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 07:48 PM
link   
This thread is a total farce and i will explain why.

Current intel cpu's are 14 nm 3d Finfet designs.
You are talking about blu-ray which is 360 - 480nm

en.wikipedia.org...

AMD K6 8,800,000 transistors 1997 AMD 0.35 µm This is 350nm. Built in 1997. Also that same size is....
Pentium II Klamath 7,500,000 transistors 1997 Intel 0.35 µm 195 mm²


Intel Haswell-E 8 Core 22nm 2.6 Billion transistors 356 mm2

Transistors turning on and off cause heat as electricity runs through them and some energy is lost.
You wont be getting a blu-ray disk worth of Core i7's. You will be getting pentium 2's and let me tell you... They run damn hot.

I don't know where you are getting your numbers from.

This is all jargonal bullshiot.

I have no doubt that maybe the technology you are talking about could definitely work, and it would be cheap, but you will not be creating a powerhouse of computing.

You should probably read this article to look at performance differences between intel cpu's from 10 years ago compared to intels cpu's two generations ago. 1997 cpu's would be much worse haha.

www.techspot.com...[editb y]edit on 9-11-2015 by DaRAGE because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-11-2015 by DaRAGE because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 08:01 PM
link   
Some of these articles are old... Why isn't this huge already?



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 08:01 PM
link   
a reply to: StargateSG7


When completed and hooked up via edge connectors to
an external display, they will be running at 10 GHZ !!!

So you would need a special type of CPU socket? Has this been done already?



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 08:07 PM
link   

originally posted by: ChaoticOrder
a reply to: StargateSG7


When completed and hooked up via edge connectors to
an external display, they will be running at 10 GHZ !!!

So you would need a special type of CPU socket? Has this been done already?


My bet would be a cpu of this type would melt quickly. It may work as a novelty, but I have my doubts.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 08:25 PM
link   

originally posted by: DaRAGE
This thread is a total farce and i will explain why.

Current intel cpu's are 14 nm 3d Finfet designs.
You are talking about blu-ray which is 360 - 480nm

AMD K6 8,800,000 transistors 1997 AMD 0.35 µm This is 350nm. Built in 1997. Also that same size is....
Pentium II Klamath 7,500,000 transistors 1997 Intel 0.35 µm 195 mm²


Intel Haswell-E 8 Core 22nm 2.6 Billion transistors 356 mm2

Transistors turning on and off cause heat as electricity runs through them and some energy is lost.
You wont be getting a blu-ray disk worth of Core i7's. You will be getting pentium 2's and let me tell you... They run damn hot.

I don't know where you are getting your numbers from.

This is all jargonal bullshiot.

I have no doubt that maybe the technology you are talking about could definitely work, and it would be cheap, but you will not be creating a powerhouse of computing.

You should probably read this article to look at performance differences between intel cpu's from 10 years ago compared to intels cpu's two generations ago. 1997 cpu's would be much worse haha.




---

Your math is quite correct for silicon substrates but
since we are dealing with STACKED 3D-XYZ layering
on polycarbonate substrate the thermal efficiency
of said plastic substrate can be MUCH IMPROVED
by embedding microchannel-based cooling between
layers. It's a technique pioneered at the University
of Alberta for microchannel-based Battery production.

Tested systems have been run at 10 GHZ (DARPA)
and the University of California has done Patentable
research:

See patent:
www.google.ca...

on cooling plastic substrates using a variety of technqiues.

Liquid filled microchannels is the best method
so far to make plastic substrate chips workable.

The individual P-N junction count per layer
is 25,000,000 at 380 nanometres and at 4 to
16 P-N junctions per diode/bipolar transistor
that is spread out over 10 layers you can get
50 BILLION transistor counts on a reasonable basis.

The deposition of Mass-produced silicon crystals
and doping thereof of the blue-light sensitive
charge carrier/barrier portion of the P-N junction
WILL fit into the pit/wells of current BluRay disc
technology.

In fact, the areal density of BluRay disc is actually
quite a bit WORSE than that of any modern Intel i7 CPU
...BUT...to get the multi-cores you just spread the transistor
counts out over the multiple layers of a single plastic disc.
(up to 10 layers deep as of 2015 and up to 30 LAYERS by 2018!)

It's the multi-layering and LARGER size pathways,
that allows embedding of cooling microchannels,
which allows for MUCH HIGHER higher clock speeds
(i.e. 10 GHZ!) at a REASONABLE running temperature.
Current calculations, estimates and final tests are in
the 90 watt range (900 watts over 10 discs) total dissipation
at 10 GHZ which REALLY ISN'T ALL THAT BAD especially if you
use edge connectors to connect the micro-channel cooling
channels to external cooling fins.

The higher thermal resistance of aluminum microwiring and
the thermal expansion issues of polycarbonate have been
problematic in the past but modern thermo-resistant
plastics are robust enough for this type of application.
It's just that using aluminum and polycarbonate is CHEAP
and EASY to make and used easy-to-manufacture BLURAY
technology so it's a HECK OF A LOT CHEAPER TO CREATE
A PLASTIC CPU/GPU/DSP than a silicon one !!!!

I understand your skepticism, but your OWN math is
quite consistent with showing the viability of this
type of plastic CPU substrate technology.
edit on 2015/11/9 by StargateSG7 because: spelling fixes



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 08:40 PM
link   

originally posted by: ChaoticOrder
a reply to: StargateSG7


When completed and hooked up via edge connectors to
an external display, they will be running at 10 GHZ !!!

So you would need a special type of CPU socket? Has this been done already?


---

To connect to external devices - pre-stamped edge connector pathways
are put on the outer edge of the discs to allow connection to an external
display, a power source and network communications peripherals.

YES this has already been done.

Current heat dissipation is as per the following:

en.wikipedia.org...

using a Thermal conductivity (k) at 23 °C of 0.19–0.22 W/(m·K) (wikipedia)

and the Polycarbonate Thermal diffusity is 0.15 per Square Millimetre/s with
a heat capacity spread out over 109.4 square cm on a Blue-Ray disc over
10 layers with in-between microchannel cooling, allows more than
100 watts to be dissipated IF appropriate cooling measures are taken.

The thermal dissipation numbers JUST WORK OUT JUST GOOD ENOUGH
to work AT A HIGH SPEED of 10 GHZ !!!!! ...IF... enough of a temperatue
differential between plastic disc layers is kept via fluid-based microchannel
cooling so that FAST thermal transfer from the circuitry to the
outside world is maintained thus keeping temperatures below
the 150 Degrees Celcius melting point of polycarbonate!

edit on 2015/11/9 by StargateSG7 because: sp

edit on 2015/11/9 by StargateSG7 because: s



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 08:58 PM
link   
I've had a couple drinks but...

35 core i7s? The latest manufacturing process for Intel chips is 14nm. The interconnect pitch is 54nm which is about a third the minimum pit size on a blu-ray (150nm). Blu-rays and other optical discs are burned/read as a spiral track of pits and the track pitch of a blu-ray disc is 320nm.

Explain the manufacturing process of the discs and how you arrived at $2. What is the substrate? How will it diffract the beam? What are the wires made of? We're talking a unique set of properties there: a laser would have to be able to break the connection without melting everything in its proximity and it would simultaneously need to of course be suitable for building the circuits.

As a concept, I think it's a neat idea and I've been wondering about how we might evolve 3D printers in the near future to print microelectronics. In some regards, I think this sounds like an interesting concept but not with blu-ray. I can see the appeal in using established technology but I suspect it's not doable and if it were, not at anything approaching the the efficiency you're imagining.

EDIT:

As was pointed out above with Haswell (22nm process):

Intel Haswell-E 8 Core has 2.6 Billion transistors in an area of 356 mm2. What's the usable surface area of a blu-ray disk? 900mm2 or there about. There's no way you could pack transistors as tightly given the geometrical constraints of the disc form factor and that's assuming there's a manufacturing process that even with the most efficient layout can reach the same densities as the chip makers on silicon.




edit on 2015-11-9 by theantediluvian because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 09:05 PM
link   
Well something has to replace silicon next decade. I've always been curious about crystals, maybe an early superman impression that stuck around, but plastic burning using lasers doesn't seem too far off. I'm also curious about using fiber at the nano level. If you could map out the human mind and assemble it with nano optical fiber strands that would be hardcore awesome. Find a synthetic equivalent for axons, dendrites, glia, etc... and go wild with a thousand variations until home sapiens are irrelevant. Oh maybe I went too far again, but year fun tech on the horizon.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 09:36 PM
link   
a reply to: pl3bscheese

Certain technologys do not make it to the public, why?

Profit and technology control are the main factors, remember the 1980's development of three dimensional optical storage crystals, Grundig was one of the partners and I think philips was another.

Too much data could be stored on them which would have meant that sales of floppys and there successors CD and now Blue Ray would have had no chance at competing.

The data was stored similar to a CD but in three dimensions with focused read and write lasers used for data transfer, basically a sugar cube sized crystal could have held your entire collection of CD's and Blue Rays (especially with the more advanced and finer laser technology of today) with room to spare but it would have meant all those lovely shiny CD frizbee's would have been obsolete before they hit the market.

Nice how suppression of that tech may have come back to bite them hard on there butt's.

edit on 9-11-2015 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 09:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: theantediluvian
I've had a couple drinks but...

35 core i7s? The latest manufacturing process for Intel chips is 14nm. The interconnect pitch is 54nm which is about a third the minimum pit size on a blu-ray (150nm). Blu-rays and other optical discs are burned/read as a spiral track of pits and the track pitch of a blu-ray disc is 320nm.

Explain the manufacturing process of the discs and how you arrived at $2. What is the substrate? How will it diffract the beam? What are the wires made of? We're talking a unique set of properties there: a laser would have to be able to break the connection without melting everything in its proximity and it would simultaneously need to of course be suitable for building the circuits.

As a concept, I think it's a neat idea and I've been wondering about how we might evolve 3D printers in the near future to print microelectronics. In some regards, I think this sounds like an interesting concept but not with blu-ray. I can see the appeal in using established technology but I suspect it's not doable and if it were, not at anything approaching the the efficiency you're imagining.


---

Each polycarbonate layer is stamped using a inverted glass master
that contains a 2D-XY array of pits or wells from 150 nm to 480 nm
in size depending upon the wavelength of the lasers ( now is blue
but in the future could be ultraviolet lasers!).

Each stamped well or pit have sharp edged walls that are
U-NOTCHED on each face on the flat plane containing a
thin-film vapor deposit of aluminum film that at the
root of the U-NOTCH forms a pathway between
another well or pit.

At the boot of each well or pit is a doped P and N silicon crystal
containing a blue light sensitive charge carrier or separator that
when actived by a pulse from a blue laser pulse at a specific
power level will POP the charge carrier thus performing
one of three actions:

1) Create a Forward bias P-N junction.

2) Create a Backward bias P-N junction.

3) Create an electrical charge storage well
forming the basis of an ON/OFF bit-based
memory storage unit.

Separating each layer is another layer of microtubules containing
a single vertical microwire (created by charge-based deposition)
that passes immediately to the above or below P-N Junction
well or pit. This allows electrical circuit pathways to be
constructed on a 3D stacked basis by using ANOTHER pulsed
beam to break or keep intact the vertical electrical connection
between vertically-stacked layers of P-N junctions.

The first laser pulse keeps or breaks the charge carrier
between deposited mass-produced P-N silicon crystals
via an amplitude-specific blue light-sensitive reactant
which affects the doping in the charge carrier.
Another power level of the pulsed laser can
create a charge-holding well to form a bit-based
storage unit by literally melting the entire P-N junction.

Then on the SAME LAYER, the blue laser can focus
and explode the U-NOTCH on any sidewall to break
a 2D-XY connection to another neighboring pit or
well. Only the connection to the desired neighbouring
P-N junction or charge storage well is kept.

For the connections BETWEEN each 2D-XY layer of
P-N junctions, the laser can focus on the vertical
microtubule that are installed between each 2D-XY
layer of P-N junctions and keep or break the connection
between the junction immediate below (or above)
the current layer by using amplitude-specific pulses
to burst the vertically oriented microwire (i.e. break a fuse)

Each layer of 2D-XY P-N junctions and layer of vertical
microwires are combined to form a stack array of junctions
that can be connected and disconnected to form a 3D-XYZ
structure similar in function to a field programmable gate array
(FPGA) but on a write-once basis.

A VHDL script at the END-USER stage tells a bluRay disc writer
to pop or keep intact connections between P-N junctions which
can form sequences that are diodes, transistors, larger logic
circuits and then soft-CPU cores using instructions that can
be loaded and run from a text-file based VHDL script which
can be either user-designed or bought as a file from an
online app-store as a Soft-CPU/GPU/DSP design.

Since Polycarbonate is stable up to 150 Celcius,
you can pre-dope the polycarbonate itself in a
flat planar or cubic array to form areas suspectible
to popping at specific amplitudes from a blue laser
pulse. This can be used to accurately break or keep
electrical connection pathways that are enabled
via thin film aluminum vapor deposition at the
disc manufacturing factory without ruining
the rest of the disc.

For ACTIVE COOLING, the factory can insert a pre-etched
layers of fluid filled microchannels that can dissipate over
100 watts to external fins. Calculate the thermal conductivity
from having spread-out CPU cores interspersed with
in-between layers of fluid filled micro-etched cooling
channels and the large SURFACE AREA of the actual
electrical pathways, and it is VERY DOABLE to run
a single disc at between 7-to-10 GHZ!

Plastic is CHEAP! Mass Produced P-N junctions are also
cheap and depositable into a factory stamped pit or well
using blu-ray disc manufacturing and disc layer alignment
and gluing techniques. The software to BURN the designs
is now mature so COSTS based upon what I have from
mass-market CD-ROM/DVD and Blue Ray manufacturers
themselves have given me a final wholesale price of
$2.00 per final CPU/GPU/DSP disc in blocks of
100,000+ discs! Order a million discs at once and
I get a price quote that is downto $1.50 per disc!

Finally the square area of the program area of
a Blue ray is about 86 square centimeters or
8600 square millimetres ON EACH LAYER
(total of 86,000 square mm on ten layers!)
which is MORE THAN ENOUGH ROOM to
burn the square area of MULTIPLE cores
of a software-burned CPU/GPU/DSP design.

Timewise and depending upon the complexity of the
VHDL script file, disc burning times are in the range
of one to four hours for a ten layer disc containing
an array of 35 equivalent 2012 era 1.6 BILLION transistor count
silicon-based Intel i7 CPU's that would normally be running
at 3.4 GHZ but on-disc would run between 7 GHZ to 10 GHZ!
edit on 2015/11/9 by StargateSG7 because: Spell Fixes

edit on 2015/11/9 by StargateSG7 because: Spell Fixes



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 10:31 PM
link   
I am waaaaaaaaaaayy out of my league on this thread, but it sounds AWESOME!!!! So, who can I start funding here on ATS to make this happen?? Stargate you seem to know what your talking about, whats it gonna cost me to get you started???? I want my 10ghz yesterday!!



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 12:03 AM
link   

originally posted by: StargateSG7

originally posted by: theantediluvian
I've had a couple drinks but...

35 core i7s? The latest manufacturing process for Intel chips is 14nm. The interconnect pitch is 54nm which is about a third the minimum pit size on a blu-ray (150nm). Blu-rays and other optical discs are burned/read as a spiral track of pits and the track pitch of a blu-ray disc is 320nm.

Explain the manufacturing process of the discs and how you arrived at $2. What is the substrate? How will it diffract the beam? What are the wires made of? We're talking a unique set of properties there: a laser would have to be able to break the connection without melting everything in its proximity and it would simultaneously need to of course be suitable for building the circuits.

As a concept, I think it's a neat idea and I've been wondering about how we might evolve 3D printers in the near future to print microelectronics. In some regards, I think this sounds like an interesting concept but not with blu-ray. I can see the appeal in using established technology but I suspect it's not doable and if it were, not at anything approaching the the efficiency you're imagining.


---

Each polycarbonate layer is stamped using a inverted glass master
that contains a 2D-XY array of pits or wells from 150 nm to 480 nm
in size depending upon the wavelength of the lasers ( now is blue
but in the future could be ultraviolet lasers!).

Each stamped well or pit have sharp edged walls that are
U-NOTCHED on each face on the flat plane containing a
thin-film vapor deposit of aluminum film that at the
root of the U-NOTCH forms a pathway between
another well or pit.

At the boot of each well or pit is a doped P and N silicon crystal
containing a blue light sensitive charge carrier or separator that
when actived by a pulse from a blue laser pulse at a specific
power level will POP the charge carrier thus performing
one of three actions:

1) Create a Forward bias P-N junction.

2) Create a Backward bias P-N junction.

3) Create an electrical charge storage well
forming the basis of an ON/OFF bit-based
memory storage unit.

Separating each layer is another layer of microtubules containing
a single vertical microwire (created by charge-based deposition)
that passes immediately to the above or below P-N Junction
well or pit. This allows electrical circuit pathways to be
constructed on a 3D stacked basis by using ANOTHER pulsed
beam to break or keep intact the vertical electrical connection
between vertically-stacked layers of P-N junctions.

The first laser pulse keeps or breaks the charge carrier
between deposited mass-produced P-N silicon crystals
via an amplitude-specific blue light-sensitive reactant
which affects the doping in the charge carrier.
Another power level of the pulsed laser can
create a charge-holding well to form a bit-based
storage unit by literally melting the entire P-N junction.

Then on the SAME LAYER, the blue laser can focus
and explode the U-NOTCH on any sidewall to break
a 2D-XY connection to another neighboring pit or
well. Only the connection to the desired neighbouring
P-N junction or charge storage well is kept.

For the connections BETWEEN each 2D-XY layer of
P-N junctions, the laser can focus on the vertical
microtubule that are installed between each 2D-XY
layer of P-N junctions and keep or break the connection
between the junction immediate below (or above)
the current layer by using amplitude-specific pulses
to burst the vertically oriented microwire (i.e. break a fuse)

Each layer of 2D-XY P-N junctions and layer of vertical
microwires are combined to form a stack array of junctions
that can be connected and disconnected to form a 3D-XYZ
structure similar in function to a field programmable gate array
(FPGA) but on a write-once basis.

A VHDL script at the END-USER stage tells a bluRay disc writer
to pop or keep intact connections between P-N junctions which
can form sequences that are diodes, transistors, larger logic
circuits and then soft-CPU cores using instructions that can
be loaded and run from a text-file based VHDL script which
can be either user-designed or bought as a file from an
online app-store as a Soft-CPU/GPU/DSP design.

Since Polycarbonate is stable up to 150 Celcius,
you can pre-dope the polycarbonate itself in a
flat planar or cubic array to form areas suspectible
to popping at specific amplitudes from a blue laser
pulse. This can be used to accurately break or keep
electrical connection pathways that are enabled
via thin film aluminum vapor deposition at the
disc manufacturing factory without ruining
the rest of the disc.

For ACTIVE COOLING, the factory can insert a pre-etched
layers of fluid filled microchannels that can dissipate over
100 watts to external fins. Calculate the thermal conductivity
from having spread-out CPU cores interspersed with
in-between layers of fluid filled micro-etched cooling
channels and the large SURFACE AREA of the actual
electrical pathways, and it is VERY DOABLE to run
a single disc at between 7-to-10 GHZ!

Plastic is CHEAP! Mass Produced P-N junctions are also
cheap and depositable into a factory stamped pit or well
using blu-ray disc manufacturing and disc layer alignment
and gluing techniques. The software to BURN the designs
is now mature so COSTS based upon what I have from
mass-market CD-ROM/DVD and Blue Ray manufacturers
themselves have given me a final wholesale price of
$2.00 per final CPU/GPU/DSP disc in blocks of
100,000+ discs! Order a million discs at once and
I get a price quote that is downto $1.50 per disc!

Finally the square area of the program area of
a Blue ray is about 86 square centimeters or
8600 square millimetres ON EACH LAYER
(total of 86,000 square mm on ten layers!)
which is MORE THAN ENOUGH ROOM to
burn the square area of MULTIPLE cores
of a software-burned CPU/GPU/DSP design.

Timewise and depending upon the complexity of the
VHDL script file, disc burning times are in the range
of one to four hours for a ten layer disc containing
an array of 35 equivalent 2012 era 1.6 BILLION transistor count
silicon-based Intel i7 CPU's that would normally be running
at 3.4 GHZ but on-disc would run between 7 GHZ to 10 GHZ!


SO this will replace a mother board and processor correct? Will it be able to run add one like ram chips and graphics cards as well?


(post by StargateSG7 removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

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