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Apollo 13 and the laws of thermodynamics.

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posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 04:47 PM
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Apollo 13 and the laws of thermodynamics.

I know there are a lot of people that think the Apollo moon landings were faked. I do believe they went to the moon but I believe what we saw was fake and the technology used was different from what they disclosed to the public. Maybe there was video footage of ETs or ET bases, "ruins" on the moon that they did not want the public to see. Who knows.

One thing that bugged me was how did they cool their suits in a near perfect insulator(space)while in direct sunlight?

and...

How did they get through the van allen belt alive?




posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 04:50 PM
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Both of these questions were already answered in the other thread where you asked them.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: John_Rodger_Cornman

Not sure about the suit-cooling technology/mechanics but the Van Allen Belt radiation has been debunked:

www.theguardian.com...




Claim: Apollo astronauts could not have travelled to the moon as a giant belt of lethal space radiation would have frazzled them.

Why it's nonsense: These so called Van Allen belts, where the Earth's magnetic field collects solar radiation, would be dangerous only if people were to hang out there for several days. The astronauts whizzed through in a matter of hours, and received a radiation dose similar to an X-ray. "You can pass through quite safely as long as you don't linger too long," Millard says.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: AdmireTheDistance

No.

No one answered how they could cool their suits in a near perfect insulating environment like space.

Much less clearly being directly in the suns radiation.

You would roast in those spacesuits without some medium to transfer the heat to. There is no medium to transfer the heat to because its a vaccuum with no air or gases to transfer heat to.

It would take a REALLY long time(out of the sun's light) for molecular motion to slow down enough to cool down.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 08:44 PM
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a reply to: John_Rodger_Cornman

The cooling system of the PLSS released water from the heat exchanger to the sublimator. Some of the water would immediately vaporize, taking heat with it.
Most would freeze on the fins of the sublimator (due to the drop in pressure which causes cooling). The ice would then sublimate, taking more heat with it.

To simplify it, water carried heat away from the EMU. Quite an elegant solution to the problem, actually.

You can read the details here:
history.nasa.gov...



edit on 11/9/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)

edit on 11/9/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 09:06 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: John_Rodger_Cornman

The cooling system of the PLSS released water from the heat exchanger to the sublimator. Some of the water would immediately vaporize, taking heat with it.
Most would freeze on the fins of the sublimator (due to the drop in pressure which causes cooling). The ice would then sublimate, taking more heat with it.

To simplify it, water carried heat away from the EMU. Quite an elegant solution to the problem, actually.

You can read the details here:
history.nasa.gov...




Such brilliance and ingenuity. When us humans think hard enough, we can do some pretty cool stuff.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 09:26 PM
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originally posted by: strongfp

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: John_Rodger_Cornman

The cooling system of the PLSS released water from the heat exchanger to the sublimator. Some of the water would immediately vaporize, taking heat with it.
Most would freeze on the fins of the sublimator (due to the drop in pressure which causes cooling). The ice would then sublimate, taking more heat with it.

To simplify it, water carried heat away from the EMU. Quite an elegant solution to the problem, actually.

You can read the details here:
history.nasa.gov...




Such brilliance and ingenuity. When us humans think hard enough, we can do some pretty cool stuff.

Truest statement I've read all day.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 10:07 PM
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originally posted by: strongfp

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: John_Rodger_Cornman

The cooling system of the PLSS released water from the heat exchanger to the sublimator. Some of the water would immediately vaporize, taking heat with it.
Most would freeze on the fins of the sublimator (due to the drop in pressure which causes cooling). The ice would then sublimate, taking more heat with it.

To simplify it, water carried heat away from the EMU. Quite an elegant solution to the problem, actually.

You can read the details here:
history.nasa.gov...




Such brilliance and ingenuity. When us humans think hard enough, we can do some pretty cool stuff.


Space is not cold. It has no temperature. The vacuum of space has no temperature.

If I had a hot cup of coffee on the moon away from the sun it would take A LONG time to cool down.

It would continue to cool down(due to its molecular motion slowing down) until it reaches near absolute zero.

NASA explanation contradicts itself.


www.abovetopsecret.com...

"NASA insists the space suits the astronauts supposedly wore on the lunar surface were air conditioned. "An air conditioner cannot, and will not work without a heat exchanger. A heat exchanger simply takes heat gathered in a medium such as freon from one place and transfers it to another place. This requires a medium of molecules which can absorb and transfer the heat such as an atmosphere or water. An air conditioner will not and cannot work in a vacuum. A space suit surrounded by a vacuum cannot transfer heat from the inside of the suit to any other place. The vacuum, remember, is a perfect insulator. A man would roast in his suit in such a circumstance.

NASA claims the spacesuits were cooled by a water system which was piped around the body, then through a system of coils sheltered from the sun in the backpack. NASA claims that water was sprayed on the coils causing a coating of ice to form. The ice then supposedly absorbed the tremendous heat collected in the water and evaporated into space. There are two problems with this that cannot be explained away. 1) The amount of water needed to be carried by the astronauts in order to make this work for even a very small length of time in the direct 55 degrees over the boiling point of water (210 degrees F at sea level on Earth) heat of the sun could not have possibly been carried by the astronauts. 2) NASA has since claimed that they found ice in moon craters. NASA claims that ice sheltered from the direct rays of the sun will NOT evaporate destroying their own bogus "air conditioning" explanation. - William Cooper

Like I said there isn't enough water coolers to exchange all that heat away so fast while in direct sun light without the protection of an atmosphere.

Its like saying an air conditioner can transfer heat out of your house without air outside. It won't there's nothing to transfer the heat to.

Air in your home---->freon heat pump----->air outside

Spacesuit--->water cooler--->nothing (the vacuum of space is not cold or hot)

You would have kept heating up in direct sunlight.

This is the reason why I believe they where using technology that was classified to cool the suits and shield themselves in the van allen belt and in direct sun light.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 10:09 PM
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The sublimator removed METABOLIC and electronics power generated heat, the heating effect of sunlight was minor.

Black body temperature at 1 AU from the sun is thermodynamically surprisingly low, somewhere around -15 C, well below freezing. It's why it was so cold on Apollo-13, or why Salyut-7 froze up in 1985 when its power system failed.

It's why Earth itself needs a greenhouse effect to be habitable.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 10:12 PM
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a reply to: John_Rodger_Cornman

The space shuttle and the ISS are passively cooled [to dump their power-usage heat] via the radiator panels you can see in photographs, the heat is radiated into space, it doesn't need a conducting medium.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 10:15 PM
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a reply to: John_Rodger_Cornman


Cooper is parroting Kaysig, who also had no idea what he was talking about.



Like I said there isn't enough water coolers to exchange all that heat away so fast while in direct sun light without the protection of an atmosphere.
Can you show us your math to support that statement?
edit on 11/9/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 10:27 PM
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a reply to: John_Rodger_Cornman

If you had a cup of coffee out in space, it would boil away rather quickly as the lack of air pressure would make it go away.

And when it does that? It takes the heat with it.

You can verify this quite easily using just a high school lab.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 10:53 PM
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a reply to: TerminalVelocity
I did the calcs a while back when the same claim arose. If I'm not mistaken, it amounts to something over 500 calories per gram to turn ice (from the sublimator fins) into water vapor. Phase changes use a lot of energy.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 11:00 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 11:06 PM
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a reply to: JimOberg
It should be noted as well, that only one side of the ISS is exposed to sunlight at any given time. And at that, only half of the time.

The side that is shadowed, radiates while on the dayside of Earth. The whole thing radiates on the nightside.

edit on 11/9/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 11:48 PM
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Op i think even Van allen believed we went to the moon as well.



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 03:04 AM
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originally posted by: John_Rodger_Cornman
If I had a hot cup of coffee on the moon away from the sun it would take A LONG time to cool down.

It would continue to cool down(due to its molecular motion slowing down) until it reaches near absolute zero.

NASA explanation contradicts itself.


You are quite wrong. Heat will radiate away from the cup according to the fourth power of the temperature difference between the coffee and the background temperature of the universe.

You seem to be oblivious to the basic fact that hot objects radiate their heat away as EM. The hot glow you feel from a fire is not due to convection or conduction. How do you think the Sun heats objects in space?



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 03:15 AM
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a reply to: John_Rodger_Cornman

The silver suits also reflect sunlight and do not "absorb" heat like a black colored suit would. The cooling system would also gain less of a work load from the choice of suit material.



posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 09:02 PM
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So, OP asked 2 questions. One which has been answered countless times before,. He doesnt acknowledge that, or that he asked a question that has been answered...just ignore it and maybe people will forget you asked it eh?

Basically, you cant think of anything to argue with regards to the Van Allen belt so you just drop it, never to be mentioned again.

This is 100% what i come to expect from people who believe in in things like this. You see it all the time in the chemtrail forum.

Carry on OP. I have nothing else to add with regards to the cooling as people have already answered better than i could have. Thanks for the info guys.



posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 05:56 AM
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If I had a hot cup of coffee on the moon away from the sun it would take A LONG time to cool down.


If you had a 'cup of coffee on the Moon' it would vaporize (boiling then turning to ice crystals) instantly in the vacuum of space...regardless of where it was.



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