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Egypt detects ‘impressive’ anomaly in Giza pyramids

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posted on Nov, 11 2015 @ 08:39 PM
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originally posted by: Cheddarhead
Could there be just a slight difference in the composition of those particular rocks, making them retain heat differently than the surrounding blocks? Looking at the daylight picture, they seem to be just a slightly different shade than the others.

If the shafts vent outside, could they build up and retain heat longer in certain spots than others?

Of course, the smart@ss in me wonders if the leftover grain in the pyramid either fermented or is holding heat like a rice filled heating pad.


It's a recess in the rock. Notice that the cracks are noticeably COOLER than the rock... in fact, they're the same temperature as the other rocks. I have two speculations that may fold together to provide an answer:
* those rocks are slightly less eroded than the others around them (they're more sheltered from the elements)... hence their properties are SLIGHTLY different than the other stones around them.
* (by the way, those temperature differences look impressive in color but are very slight (a degree or so)
* The rocks are also in contact with interior rocks, which are not cooling and heating as fast as the outer rocks.




posted on Nov, 12 2015 @ 04:02 PM
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originally posted by: truthseeker84

originally posted by: stosh64
It seems there are people in power who do all in their power to prevent any further exploration of these archeological sites. I don't understand why unless I go to the more conspiracy oriented parts of my brain.


Long story short, is there a chance that further SUBSTANCIAL, well controlled and professionally monitored archeological excavations will ever be allowed to happen?

ETA: Thank you for the thread purplemer
, Stuff like this is why I still come to ATS. S&F for you


Great points.

The Chinese Emperor Qin's Tomb is the exact same situation.

Sometimes, it just makes people wonder, why on earth, would these government officials not allow something so important, so vital to our understand of our own history.

You're both full of it.

Truthseeker, do you have any idea of the number of archaeological investigations that have occurred (and are still occurring) in Egypt over the last decade or two?

Do you deny the impact on archaeology that the "Arab Spring" and subsequent upheavals have had?

After two high-visibility investigations into the shafts, do you really think the time is ripe to claim "THEY" are hiding something from us?

Stoshi,

Nobody is interfering with the excavation that has been ongoing for Decades at Emperor Qin's Tomb.


A lot of the site has remained untouched, including the burial place of Qin himself, but there are reasons for that:

The answers to a number of historical mysteries may lie buried inside that tomb, but whether modern people will ever see inside this mausoleum depends not just on the Chinese government, but on science.

"The big hill, where the emperor is buried — nobody's been in there," said archaeologist Kristin Romey, curatorial consultant for the Terracotta Warrior exhibition at New York City’s Discovery Times Square. "Partly it's out of respect for the elders, but they also realize that nobody in the world right now has the technology to properly go in and excavate it."

Source

Nobody is hiding any archaeological evidence, and nobody is discouraging any legitimate archaeological investigation, except for regional political and ethnic grudges. Arabs aren't going to let you dig in certain spots because it might interfere with their current stance on Israel and the Jewish presence in the Levant, for example.

Harte



posted on Nov, 12 2015 @ 06:09 PM
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You're both full of it.


How so?


Truthseeker, do you have any idea of the number of archaeological investigations that have occurred (and are still occurring) in Egypt over the last decade or two?


I certainly do not and I believe I never made the claim that I do.

However, how does this change the fact that there are still limitation as of today, in terms of what Archaeologists are allowed and not allowed to do in Egypt.

There are many different hidden entrances, corridors or areas of the place are still off limits. Are you denying this? Are you making such claim as "We have 100% access to all Pyramid sites, all areas of Egypt, with 0 limitations and 0 rules." Is that what you're stating?

The point I was trying to drive across, is that this is a Conspiracy on it's own. It makes 0 sense to me that we are living in the 21st century and somehow are still so superstitious that we cannot allow ourselves to discover our own past.


Do you deny the impact on archaeology that the "Arab Spring" and subsequent upheavals have had?


I can neither deny nor confirm something that I am not well versed on. So I really fail to see the connection. There shouldn't be anything that impacts archaeology in the 21st century.

This isn't like the era of the Boxer Rebellion, you don't have the British, Americans, whoever there to jack your #... Come on people... do you still believe in these political crap?

What's next guys? If some superstitious culture worships Mars as their holy land, are we no longer allowed to "Excavate" up there? You see where I'm going with this?

Limiting what we're allowed to dig and not allowed to dig in the 21st century, is absurd and to me, a Conspiracy itself.


After two high-visibility investigations into the shafts, do you really think the time is ripe to claim "THEY" are hiding something from us?


What? I'm just utterly lost at this point...

What shaft are you talking about? There are more than 1 secret passage way if we're talking about the same Pyramid. Are we talking about what's under the Sphinx?

Regardless, there's really only two outcomes to this topic of discussion:

A. We have 100% access to all Egyptian archaeological sites.

B. We don't have 100% access to all Egyptian archaeological sites.

A is what I'm trying to drive across, which just a big Conspiracy Theory to me. It makes no sense to me that some of the greatest historical sites related to human history is basically "Off Limits" because "The People" or "The Government" don't want it excavated.

Are you implying that A is incorrect while B is correct?


Nobody is interfering with the excavation that has been ongoing for Decades at Emperor Qin's Tomb.


Now, you are being "Full of It".

They were excavating things outside of it, around it, near it, NEVER directly IN IT! The emperor's tomb itself, is NOT ALLOWED by the Chinese Government to be excavated!


"The big hill, where the emperor is buried — nobody's been in there," said archaeologist Kristin Romey, curatorial consultant for the Terracotta Warrior exhibition at New York City’s Discovery Times Square. "Partly it's out of respect for the elders, but they also realize that nobody in the world right now has the technology to properly go in and excavate it."


Misleading article written poorly almost 4 to 5 years ago.

1st: It is almost entirely out of respect for the elders. Ask any Chinese person, they will tell you the same. The Chinese consider that site to be the site of their greatest Ancestor, so out of superstitious respect, they will not touch the main tomb.

Chinese Government will not allow an excavation at this tomb, period.

2nd: Why it's misleading? Because it is utter horse # that we lack the technology to "GO IN" and "Excavate" it. We have super advanced robotics that disarms bombs and traps. We have optical equipment that can be mounted on insects. We have the technology to zap images from a planet that's not in our galaxy. You mean to tell me, that we lack the technological know how to enter a dirt rock with traps made thousands of years ago?

If that is true, then we should spend even more resources and time to get in there. As it is evident that the Qin Dynasty was much superior and much more advanced compared to humans of the 21st century. They can create intricate traps and tombs where modern technology cannot access?

It's simply an incorrect interpretation on your end.

The problem they're trying to describe, is that NO ONE, has the technology to go into the site, excavate whatever the hell we want, without touching or breaking or disturbing or changing ANYTHING inside.

Do you even understand what that means?

No one, will ever be able to create a technology where they can enter and exit a tomb leaving 0 traces of it's presence. Let alone not disturb anything of importance.

It's not technology limitation, it's simply a roadblock that was meant to be there and never meant to be overcome. So why? What's so important down there that cannot be disturbed?

They're certainly not as old or as precious as Dinosaurs fossils, so what gives? Why the need to hide? What is there to hide?

In my own opinion, knowledge and history that contradicts all modern scholarly findings. That's what you'll find in there and if Knowledge = Power, then of course, the less commoners know the better.

Did you know, that the Horse Chariot discovered at the Qin Emperor's tomb, those that are marked down in sizes, about 50% of the real life sizes, there's something unique about those chariots models.

It's very interesting, if anyone's interested, can research into that as well. Something about how difficult it is, at that time period, to make an exact replica of the horses, chariot, battle cart, everything in such detail but only 1/3 or 1/2 the size. Something about the machinery or ingenuity of it, is like literally out of that time era. Something modern humans marvel on.

There's also rumors of armor, weapon forging techniques that existed 2,300 years ago, where they were massively produced using crude molding equipment. This is simply insane in terms of technological accomplishments.

They discovered this, because parts of the warring chariots or war vehicles, weapons and/or tools, had components and parts in there that are "interchangeable". Meaning, that if one screw or wheel or something fell off of a machine, you can take another machine's parts and put it in this one to use it.

Imagine yourself building things by hand, there's simply no way you can achieve that kind of precision where components are interchangeable. The only way for that to work, is to have knowledge in areas of injection and molding equipment.

Anyway, much of the mystery in these places will never be discovered. If you are so gullible and naive to believe that it's cultural superstition that's keeping the archaeologists away, then I really can't convince you otherwise now can I?



posted on Nov, 12 2015 @ 06:15 PM
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originally posted by: truthseeker84

They discovered this, because parts of the warring chariots or war vehicles, weapons and/or tools, had components and parts in there that are "interchangeable". Meaning, that if one screw or wheel or something fell off of a machine, you can take another machine's parts and put it in this one to use it.

Imagine yourself building things by hand, there's simply no way you can achieve that kind of precision where components are interchangeable. The only way for that to work, is to have knowledge in areas of injection and molding equipment.


en.wikipedia.org...



Evidence of the use of interchangeable parts can be traced back over two thousand years to Carthage in the First Punic War. Carthaginian ships had standardized, interchangeable parts that even came with assembly instructions akin to "tab a into slot b" marked on them.[3]


edit on 12-11-2015 by Marduk because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2015 @ 07:36 PM
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originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: truthseeker84

They discovered this, because parts of the warring chariots or war vehicles, weapons and/or tools, had components and parts in there that are "interchangeable". Meaning, that if one screw or wheel or something fell off of a machine, you can take another machine's parts and put it in this one to use it.

Imagine yourself building things by hand, there's simply no way you can achieve that kind of precision where components are interchangeable. The only way for that to work, is to have knowledge in areas of injection and molding equipment.


en.wikipedia.org...



Evidence of the use of interchangeable parts can be traced back over two thousand years to Carthage in the First Punic War. Carthaginian ships had standardized, interchangeable parts that even came with assembly instructions akin to "tab a into slot b" marked on them.[3]



Not too sure what you're getting at, but if you are saying that the technology existed 2000 years ago, then yes, that's exactly what I said, it's fascinating.

However, the scale of it and how to achieve it, is the interesting part.

During the First Punic War, perhaps there was interchangeable parts for ships (large parts), but on what kind of scale are we talking about here and what precision in making these parts?

Did you notice a keyword when it described the Qin Dynasty? The bronze bow locking mechanism and trigger were "MASS-PRODUCED". The ship parts in the First Punic War, was not MASS PRODUCED.

Meaning, there is a huge difference, in making "Interchangeable Parts" by hand, vs producing it in thousands, tens of thousands on a MASSIVE SCALE.

Make 18 wheels, or sail posts, sure... all the same size. Make 1,800 wheels or sail posts by hand, tell me if you can guarantee all 1,800 pieces will be interchangeable, I guarantee you, it's not going to happen by hand.

It's interesting how people only read certain parts of a text but at times omit the most important sections.

What scholars finds "impressive" was not the fact that WHO invented interchangeable parts FIRST, but who did it in a way that was basically unimaginable for people living 2000 years in the past.

In order to MASS PRODUCE something so precise and so small such as locking mechanism or triggers , you need assembly line, machinery, mold, injection methods, cool offs, the entire fabrication process is just mind boggling. This occurred almost 2,300 years ago and it's not only on weapons either.



posted on Nov, 12 2015 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: Marduk

I bet its the room where the Aliens are controlling David Cameron's face from

LMAO



posted on Nov, 12 2015 @ 08:01 PM
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originally posted by: truthseeker84

originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: truthseeker84

They discovered this, because parts of the warring chariots or war vehicles, weapons and/or tools, had components and parts in there that are "interchangeable". Meaning, that if one screw or wheel or something fell off of a machine, you can take another machine's parts and put it in this one to use it.

Imagine yourself building things by hand, there's simply no way you can achieve that kind of precision where components are interchangeable. The only way for that to work, is to have knowledge in areas of injection and molding equipment.


en.wikipedia.org...



Evidence of the use of interchangeable parts can be traced back over two thousand years to Carthage in the First Punic War. Carthaginian ships had standardized, interchangeable parts that even came with assembly instructions akin to "tab a into slot b" marked on them.[3]



Not too sure what you're getting at, but if you are saying that the technology existed 2000 years ago, then yes, that's exactly what I said, it's fascinating.

However, the scale of it and how to achieve it, is the interesting part.

During the First Punic War, perhaps there was interchangeable parts for ships (large parts), but on what kind of scale are we talking about here and what precision in making these parts?

Did you notice a keyword when it described the Qin Dynasty? The bronze bow locking mechanism and trigger were "MASS-PRODUCED". The ship parts in the First Punic War, was not MASS PRODUCED.

Meaning, there is a huge difference, in making "Interchangeable Parts" by hand, vs producing it in thousands, tens of thousands on a MASSIVE SCALE.

Make 18 wheels, or sail posts, sure... all the same size. Make 1,800 wheels or sail posts by hand, tell me if you can guarantee all 1,800 pieces will be interchangeable, I guarantee you, it's not going to happen by hand.

It's interesting how people only read certain parts of a text but at times omit the most important sections.

What scholars finds "impressive" was not the fact that WHO invented interchangeable parts FIRST, but who did it in a way that was basically unimaginable for people living 2000 years in the past.

In order to MASS PRODUCE something so precise and so small such as locking mechanism or triggers , you need assembly line, machinery, mold, injection methods, cool offs, the entire fabrication process is just mind boggling. This occurred almost 2,300 years ago and it's not only on weapons either.


The Sumerians were mass producing bricks from moulds 5000 years ago. They even had a stamp so that the name of the king could be impressed on them
Spear tips were made from moulds in the bronze age. This is well known and accepted by scholars. no need for incredulity.


edit on 12-11-2015 by Marduk because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2015 @ 08:40 PM
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originally posted by: truthseeker84

You're both full of it.


How so?


Already answered.


do you have any idea of the number of archaeological investigations that have occurred (and are still occurring) in Egypt over the last decade or two?


originally posted by: truthseeker84
I certainly do not and I believe I never made the claim that I do.

Yet you claim to somehow know it's not been enough, don't you?


originally posted by: truthseeker84However, how does this change the fact that there are still limitation as of today, in terms of what Archaeologists are allowed and not allowed to do in Egypt.

There are limitations on what Archaeologists allowed or not allowed to do pretty much everywhere.

But how many of these other places have had their culture stripped away and put on display for Europeans?


originally posted by: truthseeker84There are many different hidden entrances, corridors or areas of the place are still off limits. Are you denying this? Are you making such claim as "We have 100% access to all Pyramid sites, all areas of Egypt, with 0 limitations and 0 rules." Is that what you're stating?

Depends what you mean by "we," but yes, no site is "forbidden" to legitimate archaeological investigation.


Do you deny the impact on archaeology that the "Arab Spring" and subsequent upheavals have had?


originally posted by: truthseeker84I can neither deny nor confirm something that I am not well versed on. So I really fail to see the connection. There shouldn't be anything that impacts archaeology in the 21st century.

Other than a bullet in the head, you mean?


After two high-visibility investigations into the shafts, do you really think the time is ripe to claim "THEY" are hiding something from us?



originally posted by: truthseeker84What? I'm just utterly lost at this point...

What shaft are you talking about?

The shafts in Stoshi's post - you know, you referred to it as a "good point."



originally posted by: truthseeker84
A. We have 100% access to all Egyptian archaeological sites.

B. We don't have 100% access to all Egyptian archaeological sites.

A is what I'm trying to drive across, which just a big Conspiracy Theory to me. It makes no sense to me that some of the greatest historical sites related to human history is basically "Off Limits" because "The People" or "The Government" don't want it excavated.

Are you implying that A is incorrect while B is correct?

Again, with the qualifying "we," yes, A is correct.

But you'd be an idiot to go into some of those places with just a digging crew and a couple of academics. Unless you had a death wish, that is.


Nobody is interfering with the excavation that has been ongoing for Decades at Emperor Qin's Tomb.



originally posted by: truthseeker84Now, you are being "Full of It".

They were excavating things outside of it, around it, near it, NEVER directly IN IT! The emperor's tomb itself, is NOT ALLOWED by the Chinese Government to be excavated!

I quoted to you - and linked you to - exactly why this was. You'd rather take a shovel or, what, a bulldozer to it?


"The big hill, where the emperor is buried — nobody's been in there," said archaeologist Kristin Romey, curatorial consultant for the Terracotta Warrior exhibition at New York City’s Discovery Times Square. "Partly it's out of respect for the elders, but they also realize that nobody in the world right now has the technology to properly go in and excavate it."



originally posted by: truthseeker84Misleading article written poorly almost 4 to 5 years ago.

1st: It is almost entirely out of respect for the elders. Ask any Chinese person, they will tell you the same. The Chinese consider that site to be the site of their greatest Ancestor, so out of superstitious respect, they will not touch the main tomb.

Chinese Government will not allow an excavation at this tomb, period.

2nd: Why it's misleading? Because it is utter horse # that we lack the technology to "GO IN" and "Excavate" it. We have super advanced robotics that disarms bombs and traps. We have optical equipment that can be mounted on insects. We have the technology to zap images from a planet that's not in our galaxy. You mean to tell me, that we lack the technological know how to enter a dirt rock with traps made thousands of years ago?

If that is true, then we should spend even more resources and time to get in there. As it is evident that the Qin Dynasty was much superior and much more advanced compared to humans of the 21st century. They can create intricate traps and tombs where modern technology cannot access?

It's simply an incorrect interpretation on your end.


You also called it "poorly written." Got any woo explanations for that statement?

The point of excavating is preserving what you're excavating. It seems to me that it is you with the incorrect interpretation here.

You're mention of "rumors" of this and that was humorous, at least.

Harte
edit on 11/12/2015 by Harte because: I said so



posted on Nov, 12 2015 @ 09:40 PM
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originally posted by: truthseeker84
However, how does this change the fact that there are still limitation as of today, in terms of what Archaeologists are allowed and not allowed to do in Egypt.


In fact, they're pretty much the same limitations as on archaeologists digging on important sites in government owned areas in any country of the world. You have to
* get permission to dig
** which may involve competition with others who want to dig the same site (which is true in Egypt)
* prove that you're a scholar/legitimate researcher
** prove that you know how to do archaeological research
* prove that you have the funding to do so
* show that you've managed teams and projects before (so generally the newcomer is either affiliated with a museum or university)
* sign agreements that show you understand the laws of the country and acknowledge who owns what.

On a highly traveled site (I visited several in Egypt), you will also have to show a conservation plan.

All of these documents are findable if you know where to look for them.

As for secrecy, each dig will employ 20-50 people, including various grad students and undergrad students who rotate through the project (you have to compete for a slot. Generally you will be allowed to do ONE field school of 4-6 weeks ... but not more unless you get a particular position on the crew.) So every one of those Giza digs has seen hundreds of people come through and work and examine the material... thousands of people have worked on the site in the past 30 years.

If you want to look for hidden things, you'll have to talk to the students who dug there.

I suspect you'll be disappointed if you look for conspiracies but you'll hear some fascinating tales.



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 02:17 PM
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originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: truthseeker84

originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: truthseeker84

They discovered this, because parts of the warring chariots or war vehicles, weapons and/or tools, had components and parts in there that are "interchangeable". Meaning, that if one screw or wheel or something fell off of a machine, you can take another machine's parts and put it in this one to use it.

Imagine yourself building things by hand, there's simply no way you can achieve that kind of precision where components are interchangeable. The only way for that to work, is to have knowledge in areas of injection and molding equipment.


en.wikipedia.org...



Evidence of the use of interchangeable parts can be traced back over two thousand years to Carthage in the First Punic War. Carthaginian ships had standardized, interchangeable parts that even came with assembly instructions akin to "tab a into slot b" marked on them.[3]



Not too sure what you're getting at, but if you are saying that the technology existed 2000 years ago, then yes, that's exactly what I said, it's fascinating.

However, the scale of it and how to achieve it, is the interesting part.

During the First Punic War, perhaps there was interchangeable parts for ships (large parts), but on what kind of scale are we talking about here and what precision in making these parts?

Did you notice a keyword when it described the Qin Dynasty? The bronze bow locking mechanism and trigger were "MASS-PRODUCED". The ship parts in the First Punic War, was not MASS PRODUCED.

Meaning, there is a huge difference, in making "Interchangeable Parts" by hand, vs producing it in thousands, tens of thousands on a MASSIVE SCALE.

Make 18 wheels, or sail posts, sure... all the same size. Make 1,800 wheels or sail posts by hand, tell me if you can guarantee all 1,800 pieces will be interchangeable, I guarantee you, it's not going to happen by hand.

It's interesting how people only read certain parts of a text but at times omit the most important sections.

What scholars finds "impressive" was not the fact that WHO invented interchangeable parts FIRST, but who did it in a way that was basically unimaginable for people living 2000 years in the past.

In order to MASS PRODUCE something so precise and so small such as locking mechanism or triggers , you need assembly line, machinery, mold, injection methods, cool offs, the entire fabrication process is just mind boggling. This occurred almost 2,300 years ago and it's not only on weapons either.


The Sumerians were mass producing bricks from moulds 5000 years ago. They even had a stamp so that the name of the king could be impressed on them
Spear tips were made from moulds in the bronze age. This is well known and accepted by scholars. no need for incredulity.



I'm not trying to exaggerate. You cannot just overlook these technological achievements and scoff away.

Also, I'm not certain what point you're trying to get across. As you continue to compare CRUDE things vs. INTRICATE things. Which really doesn't make much sense to me.

Like, as if you're telling me: "Hey... my horse chariot can run as fast as your Ford Mustang at 40mph. Which is great and all, but a horse chariot is a horse chariot, a Ford Mustang is a Ford Mustang. You can't compare them like that. Molding large objects vs. molding/assembling tiny smaller objects with high precision, such as triggers and locking mechanisms, armor, tools, is just not the same.

Spear tips are made from molds during the Bronze Age? Perhaps.. but did you know..:

The earliest Chinese bronzes were made by the method known as piece-mold casting


The earliest Chinese bronzes were made by the method known as piece-mold casting—as opposed to the lost-wax method, which was used in all other Bronze Age cultures. In piece-mold casting, a model is made of the object to be cast, and a clay mold taken of the model. The mold is then cut in sections to release the model, and the sections are reassembled after firing to form the mold for casting. If the object to be cast is a vessel, a core has to be placed inside the mold to provide the vessel's cavity. The piece-mold method was most likely the only one used in China until at least the end of the Shang dynasty. An advantage of this rather cumbersome way of casting bronze was that the decorative patterns could be carved or stamped directly on the inner surface of the mold before it was fired. This technique enabled the bronzeworker to achieve a high degree of sharpness and definition in even the most intricate designs.


So, still worth a mention.

And don't even get me started with I-Ching, as no other culture can compare to that.



posted on Nov, 14 2015 @ 10:02 PM
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I think it’s interesting that Flir’s company logo is nearly the same shape as the entrance to the Great Pyramid of Giza. Flir’s company logo is a mirror of a single gabled roof whereas the entrance to the pyramid is a dual gabled roof.

The company logo is shown with the recent “impressive” thermal scan anomaly at the base of the Great Pyramid, which is facing east.



Flir company logo



Here is an 1808 drawing of the entrance to the pyramid with a person to show the scale.


Here is a modern photo of the entrance.


I wonder if something will really become of this new finding with the recent thermal scan. Flir’s brand statement is The World’s Sixth Sense. The sixth sense is usually associated with an eye on one’s forehead. This eye on the forehead has been also associated with the eye of Ra.



posted on Nov, 14 2015 @ 10:11 PM
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a reply to: bananashooter

It is viral. Anyone want to open a cesspit that has been fermented for over 3000 years?
edit on 14/11/2015 by NJE777 because: Voice ap



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 07:24 PM
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originally posted by: truthseeker84

I'm not trying to exaggerate. You cannot just overlook these technological achievements and scoff away.


Well, maybe you should consider that all the things you are attempting to discuss here are not only fully understood by science, but they are also off topic.

Feel free to start your own thread where you can tell everyone how amazed you are that our ancestors weren't idiots. Most people are already aware of that though


p.s. the I Ching blows goats.



posted on Nov, 15 2015 @ 07:27 PM
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originally posted by: NJE777
a reply to: bananashooter

It is viral. Anyone want to open a cesspit that has been fermented for over 3000 years?

I think archaeologists are actually quite interested in cesspits. Lot to learn about how people lived at the time.



posted on Nov, 16 2015 @ 06:18 PM
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originally posted by: Phage

originally posted by: NJE777
a reply to: bananashooter

It is viral. Anyone want to open a cesspit that has been fermented for over 3000 years?

I think archaeologists are actually quite interested in cesspits. Lot to learn about how people lived at the time.


That's because



even ancient aliens.

Harte



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 04:00 PM
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a reply to: Harte

Its nice to see you have a sense of humor



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 05:03 PM
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a reply to: Triton1128
Either my humor is really, really bad or you haven't been reading my posts much.

I prefer to think the latter.

Harte



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 05:33 PM
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originally posted by: Harte
a reply to: Triton1128
Either my humor is really, really bad or you haven't been reading my posts much.

I prefer to think the latter.

Harte



Well you do have that nasty handicap of being an American



posted on Nov, 17 2015 @ 05:48 PM
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originally posted by: Marduk

originally posted by: Harte
a reply to: Triton1128
Either my humor is really, really bad or you haven't been reading my posts much.

I prefer to think the latter.

Harte



Well you do have that nasty handicap of being an American


Made you lol more than once.

Harte



posted on Nov, 30 2015 @ 07:25 AM
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originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: Cheddarhead
Could there be just a slight difference in the composition of those particular rocks, making them retain heat differently than the surrounding blocks? Looking at the daylight picture, they seem to be just a slightly different shade than the others.

If the shafts vent outside, could they build up and retain heat longer in certain spots than others?

Of course, the smart@ss in me wonders if the leftover grain in the pyramid either fermented or is holding heat like a rice filled heating pad.


It's a recess in the rock. Notice that the cracks are noticeably COOLER than the rock... in fact, they're the same temperature as the other rocks. I have two speculations that may fold together to provide an answer:
* those rocks are slightly less eroded than the others around them (they're more sheltered from the elements)... hence their properties are SLIGHTLY different than the other stones around them.
* (by the way, those temperature differences look impressive in color but are very slight (a degree or so)
* The rocks are also in contact with interior rocks, which are not cooling and heating as fast as the outer rocks.



i gotta say, this is a good point. if its a one degree difference in temperature thats not ebough for me to tear apart a priceless pyramid.. how many degrees cooler is this tech really picking up?



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