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Really sad how Veterinarians have become Sales people

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posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 03:54 AM
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We recently changed vets because of the change in attitude at the office we'd used for over 20 years. Our vet retired and although we tried to stay with that practice the two young ladies who took over were very much sales people.
We've always had cats. Our cats typically live well into their teen years and in all that time we've never had to have their teeth cleaned. They eat a mix of dry food and whatever they catch in their outdoor time.
But when we took the male in for his first "senior" visit, we were urged to get his teeth cleaned. Minimum charge was $700 if only cleaning was required.
Both of these women were afraid of that big boy and never really examined his teeth.
I took him to another vet for a second opinion and he now has a new vet. She's not afraid of him and he likes her. She also doesn't push vaccines, takes a more holistic approach.
I hope you find a better with a new vet.




posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 04:17 AM
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a reply to: muse7

You need a new vet. My vet gives a discount for services for rescue pets, uses her knowledge to diagnose rather then rely on expensive tests whenever possible. and volunteers her time to work with and rescue strays on Native Reserves.

Not all vets are bad.


edit on 9-11-2015 by Leonidas because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 05:01 AM
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a reply to: muse7

It's not surprising many vets are sales people first, vet second, with so many vet colleges sponsored by pet food companies breeding people who plug their products.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 05:43 AM
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a reply to: Mandroid7

Puppy shots are very important..however after 5 or 6 years your dog probably has built up immunity against the diseases the vaccines are designed to prevent...over vaccination in my opinion can be as dangerous as not vaccinating your puppy at all..there's this thing called a Titer test which can tell you if your dog has built up immunity against certain canine diseases...the rabies shot is mandatory so I don't skip that one...thankfully it's only every 3 years now.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 05:48 AM
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a reply to: Domo1

Yep they were pushing the 4 you listed...he has been vaccinated for those diseases countless of times in his 14 years now..he probably has built up immunity, I will take him in to have a Titer test done in a few weeks to verify that.

So in that appointment they wanted to vaccinate him 4 times, give him an insecticide for fleas, and also give him another vaccine for heartworm

so yeah

5 vaccines, a flea insecticide in pill form in one day for a 14 year old, 16 pound Rat Terrier-Chihuahua mix

No way in hell was I going to put him through that.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 06:31 AM
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I wish you lived near me, I could introduce you to the best Vet on the planet. She doesn't push drugs or products and actually cares about my pets. 2 cancer surgeries on my ferret, including all antibiotics, pain meds, x rays, anesthetic [ and she even took him home with her to keep an eye on him!! ] ..... $432

I have an older dog and my vet just tells me to give her glucosamine for her joints. It does wonders and you don't have to pay $1000 a bottle at Vet prices, just go to any store. Give dosage according to your dogs weight.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 08:09 AM
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a reply to: muse7

Interesting...my local vet also pushes Science Diet. I can't recall the website but after some research I discovered that food brand was rated as one of the poorest.

I've heard good things about Orijen. I think you've made a good choice there.

As far as the vet himself goes, I firmly believe that the vaccinations are fine but it also depends on what environment your dog lives in. If your dog is at dog parks with random strange dogs, or kennels/doggy "day care", or has any regular interaction with wildlife (chasing local rabbits or squirrels, etc) I would reconsider the shots. If you and your dog aren't generally exposed to those situations you're probably fine without the shots.

Also, with fleas and ticks, I agree with the poster before me. Treating your lawn and yard isn't very effective.

My advice...get a second opinion from a completely unrelated vet and ask questions. If they push a product or service ask why. There are plenty of good, honest vets out there. My experience is that the cheaper vets are the ones that push more services for the extra fees, which makes them more expensive on the back end. Shop around, find a good vet, and consider paying a small premium for the best advice. You'll find it cheaper in the long run.

GL to you and your dog.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 08:28 AM
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a reply to: muse7

I've learned that I am as responsible for my pets health, as I am for my own. My doctor wants to do the same thing. Anytime I have an issue, he wants me to try some drug or other. It's so sick!

Give them knuckle bones for their teeth!

There are some times when Western Medicine is just the ticket, like a broken leg, but MANY times, there are better, safer treatment than you're going to get at the vet or the doctor!



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 08:31 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
That much money to clean teeth? Who would pay to have their dogs teeth cleaned?

I never saw a dog inspecting his teeth in the mirror. I bet they would rather have some dog bones than go get their teeth cleaned.


If you are not regularly brushing your pets teeth they will eventually require a dental. Periodontal disease can lead to a whole host of other more serious conditions.





edit on 9-11-2015 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer so I am ging to harvest his liver



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

I agree with this, but I know a great alternative. I don't know the brand, but my local higher end pet store sells green or reddish-brown "treats" that are shaped like a big cartoonish toothbrush, or hedgehogs, or alligators. They come in different sizes. They're great for dental maintenance, but you still need to check from time to time.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 09:46 AM
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a reply to: stolencar18

Are you referring to Greenies?



If so, you should still brush your pet's teeth to help prevent periodontal disease. We use a chicken-flavor toothpaste that both dogs like. They start drooling when they see the toothbrushes.





edit on 9-11-2015 by AugustusMasonicus because: Never go in against a Sicilian when death is on the line



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

My dogs love those, but Jumbo is as big as they make them. I give them 2 each, because they don't make a "Oh My God That's A Dog??!!!" size.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 12:19 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Yes those! But there are other shapes/sizes too. And colours (flavours?).

I don't think I'm familiar enough with periodontal disease in dogs to comment much more. I just know that my dogs teeth and gums look great and she's never had a problem at the vet with them. Like I said, these are great for maintenance, but perhaps not more intense things.

My English Bulldog absolutely devours them.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: stolencar18

As long as your dog's teeth and gums look healthy that is a good start. You should still try to brush them regularly and get check ups with your vet. Periodontal diesease can lead to many more serious health issues. Preventative care with our pets spares them the difficulty of needless and possibly painful procedures down the line.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 09:09 PM
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a reply to: muse7

Sad to say, my experience agrees with yours. When my Rottie tore open her leg jumping a fence - the vet (mine old one had retired) hardly paid attention to the wound for all the 'tests' we had to do first and surgery fees and boarding. Took her to my daughter's vet 30 miles away and they stiched up the wound without any hassle - there are a few good vets left.... but I've not found one closer then 30 miles.



posted on Nov, 9 2015 @ 09:11 PM
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originally posted by: FyreByrd
a reply to: muse7

Sad to say, my experience agrees with yours. When my Rottie tore open her leg jumping a fence - the vet (mine old one had retired) hardly paid attention to the wound for all the 'tests' we had to do first and surgery fees and boarding. Took her to my daughter's vet 30 miles away and they stiched up the wound without any hassle - there are a few good vets left.... but I've not found one closer then 30 miles.

BTW - try Tumeric - I put it in my Rottie's food as she got older (started with a little bit and built up as she got accustomed to the taste) and it worked like a champ. It takes a while to build up in the system, but it fights inflamation of all types. I take it moring and night for my 'miseries'.




posted on Nov, 10 2015 @ 08:12 AM
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I've had the same vet for 20 years, and I have trusted him immensely. BUT in the last maybe two or three years, every time I leave there I feel like my bill has been padded. I never leave the vet's now without a 4 or 500. bill it seems. Everything everybody else said. Injections, pills, special foods,

He's getting older now, and I've wondered if he's thinking about retiring, and wants to get the bank account in good shape before he does. He also employs a ton of people.

I'd think about leaving too, but I still like and trust him otherwise, and apparently they are all doing this now anyway.



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