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It's official: Mars' atmosphere was stripped away by solar winds

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posted on Nov, 5 2015 @ 08:44 PM
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So, I saw that the magnetic fields became weaker on Mars Approximately 4.2 billion years ago. With the atmosphere lost around 4.2 to 3.7 years ago.

That's an extremely long time for "things" to crumble and return to "nature"?

Perhaps faint squares, tracks and supposed foundations are exactly that. A lot of weathering can happen over a 4.2 billion year period?

Just saying.




posted on Nov, 5 2015 @ 08:46 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn

You dont think your attitude is "deliberately bias"? You believe whatever youre told by NASA and nothing that contradicts that. Thats the definition of bias. Im not sticking up for wild speculation. Im merely pointing out that we MIGHT not be privy to all that is known about space. If you want to insist that we are, knock yourself out.



posted on Nov, 5 2015 @ 10:11 PM
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A question from the fringes of accepted science... could a large enough nuclear explosion, or two, do away with a whole planet's magnetic field?

And Earth losing it's field is less immediately scary than, say, losing the microorganisms that create our O2 due to the rising acidity in our oceans, for example.

Anyway, cool... in a gained knowledge sense, anyway. It rather indicates the fragility of planets and the constant fight life has to wage to keep it's...er "eponymous-ness."
edit on 11/5/2015 by Baddogma because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 03:45 AM
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originally posted by: Urantia1111
a reply to: projectvxn

You dont think your attitude is "deliberately bias"? You believe whatever youre told by NASA and nothing that contradicts that.

What about things told by ESA, Soviet/Russian space agency, Indian space agency, and many institutes, universities, and other kinds of organisations that contribute to, and even directly operate, various scientific instruments aboard the spacecraft or rovers and landers? If there is data that contradicts what they say, then I'd like to see it, presented in a well-substantiated and scientific form.


Im not sticking up for wild speculation. Im merely pointing out that we MIGHT not be privy to all that is known about space. If you want to insist that we are, knock yourself out.

No one's insisting that we know all about space there is to know; scientists certainly aren't (insisting). But at least those organisations do science properly and professionally, unlike the "armchair experts" and crank Youtube video authors. If such a person believes he found the truth, let them publish their findings in a science paper and have it for analysis and peer-review. If someone finds Nibiru, let them post its celestial coordinates and photometry, and let the countless amateur astronomers confirm its existence.

There's a strict and well-established method of finding out about the universe and how it works, it's called scientific method. Waving it all off by saying that "scientists are always wrong" smacks of ignorance and disrespect. That we achieved those space missions, alone provea that science (as far as we have learned of it) works; otherwise we'd never be able to get a rocket off the ground, get it into orbit, or to another planet/moon/comet/asteroid.

I rest my case.
edit on 6-11-2015 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 03:47 AM
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originally posted by: Baddogma
A question from the fringes of accepted science... could a large enough nuclear explosion, or two, do away with a whole planet's magnetic field?

Hardly, as a global magnetic field is produced at the planet's core. You'd probably have to blow up the whole planet to make it lose its magnetic field.



posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 03:54 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Thanks... just checking.



posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 07:10 AM
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edit on 6-11-2015 by FamCore because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 08:19 AM
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a reply to: raedar

My gut feeling says this is BS.. Why did Mars have a atmosphere to begin with..?




posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 09:01 AM
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how did Mars lose its magnetic field in the first place?



posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: Urantia1111




You dont think your attitude is "deliberately bias"? You believe whatever youre told by NASA and nothing that contradicts that.


I follow the data, much of which is open for public review for free on the internet.




Thats the definition of bias.


No it isn't:

"prejudice in favor of or against one thing, person, or group compared with another, usually in a way considered to be unfair."

I find your inclination to be accusatory toward myself and NASA to be bias..Because it is.




Im not sticking up for wild speculation. Im merely pointing out that we MIGHT not be privy to all that is known about space.


It takes time to gather data. You're just angry at the exploration process because it hasn't discovered a race of super beings to confirm everything you believe.




If you want to insist that we are, knock yourself out.


I will, thanks.



posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 10:57 AM
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originally posted by: n00bUK
Our earth is changing dramatically from climate change. Does this prove that it's not due to humans or does it prove that Mars had a population that caused the same change that we're going through now?



It is NOT changing dramatically. Please stop believing the propaganda. Good lord.



posted on Nov, 6 2015 @ 05:30 PM
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originally posted by: zatara
a reply to: raedar

My gut feeling says this is BS.. Why did Mars have a atmosphere to begin with..?


Why do Earth and Venus have an atmosphere? Why does Saturn's moon Titan have an atmosphere?

Just because you don't understand something, doesn't give the reason to call it BS.



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 01:04 AM
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originally posted by: n00bUK
Our earth is changing dramatically from climate change. Does this prove that it's not due to humans or does it prove that Mars had a population that caused the same change that we're going through now?



Neither would be the correct answer to your question.



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 01:05 AM
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originally posted by: the owlbear

originally posted by: nonjudgementalist
This is very significant news because our own magnetic field is getting weaker.


I honestly think that magnetism is something that needs to be studied deeply. The same with gravity. We can observe and reproduce the effects on a small scale, but still have little clue as to what these forces are.


It is, has been, and will continue to be. Interesting opinion.



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 01:23 AM
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"It is, has been, and will continue to be" is about all we know about gravity. Gravity is one of the biggest wildcards out there. No one... and I mean no one, can substantially make a case that they have any idea what it is at a quantum level. We only understand gravity's end result it a general frame work... but the deeper we dig, the stranger it gets.



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 10:39 AM
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a reply to: NewzNose



They (NASA) have failed too many times recently in advising of apperance of and incoming meteors, asteroids, etc. Because...they didn't see them coming. Russia and Iran both have experienced damage from unannounced, incoming meteors.


Thousands of meteors enter our atmosphere every year and many of them go unnoticed. So do earthquakes- go to USGS and check the real time map- There are dozens of earthquakes that happen every day that are benign. Lightning strikes are recorded hundreds of times a day yet we don't worry about getting hit by lightning.

The odds are a million to one in our favor but we will always worry about the one.



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 10:57 AM
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a reply to: stormcell

Imagine if he left the "know how" on notes?



posted on Nov, 7 2015 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: NewzNose



They (NASA) have failed too many times recently in advising of apperance of and incoming meteors, asteroids, etc. Because...they didn't see them coming. Russia and Iran both have experienced damage from unannounced, incoming meteors.

Why on earth do you think that NASA should be responsible for detecting and anouncing every meteor strike? They are just one country's (USA's) space agency, mostly occupied with their country's space missions. The task of looking out for any new or potentially dangerous asteroids is better left up to the "army" of amateur astronomers (who are unrestricted by timelines/targets/budgets) all around the world to keep their eyes on the skies. And even they can't see every meteoroid/asteroid that impacts our atmosphere.

Stop getting so hung up on NASA, and learn about how astronomy works.



posted on Nov, 8 2015 @ 03:32 PM
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a reply to: raedar

Well this is tragically sad then, because we now know that Mars probably at one time had life, until... Later... We have got to get humans on that planet and do some fossil hunting.



posted on Nov, 8 2015 @ 03:36 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

Mars still does have a "thin" atmosphere... Look at the pictures from the surface of the planet, do you see black space and stars? You see them from the surface of the moon, because the moon has zero atmosphere, but Mars still has a thin one. Mars atmosphere is too thin to support life as we know it and water as we know it, but it does have one.

Basically like Venus, Mars went south after it's formation.



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