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Replacement for garlic/ginger?

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posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 11:56 AM
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I love too cook, especially Asian style dishes. I have one problem...my partner has a pancreas that cannot handle garlic or ginger.

I get pretty creative about leaving it out of a lot of dishes, replacing garlic with onions, a bit more pepper and a splash of cider vinegar; but a lot of Asian dishes just don't taste the same without that garlic & ginger combo.

Do any creative cooks in the forums have any suggestions? He absolutely loves Asian food, but it's to the point where going to an Asian restaurant just is not an option for him with the gut pain it can cause.

Any help appreciated!




posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 11:58 AM
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Ginger and lime remind me of each other. You should taste them and see if you think so.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: Iamthatbish

I will definitely try upping the lime juice in some recipes.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:06 PM
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I served in the mission field in Asia and Ginger is a great spice. Some countries use garlic and ginger in the same dish.

Ground up fine it is called in some places Salabat. It is used as a drink. calms stomachs, helps with sinus problem, been known to help with the ladies monthly visitor by calming cramping. ginger is also linked to longevity of life and over all helps promote good health.

the full benefits of ginger have not been revealed by modern science yet.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Ginger is definitely a wonder food. I love it for calming nausea, or making tea.
Unfortunately, it's a pain on the mans pancreas. Garlic too; also, overly fatty foods, hard liquors and wine, and extremely spicy foods.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:19 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Oh! That's too bad! I love ginger AND garlic! It would be awful to give either up... I would try allspice.



Substitutes for Ginger

For 1 teaspoon fresh or ground ginger, substitute 1 teaspoon ground allspice, ground cinnamon, ground mace, or ground nutmeg.
Source



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:20 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct
it like other spices or natural-pathic medication should not be over used.

Over use will always cause harm.

IN the East they put the ginger in a rice wine and drink the wine. Before the ginger is uncovered by the wine and air hits it you refill the bottle with more rice wine. this keeps the ginger good and the benefits going for a long time I once drank some wine that had ginger in it. the Chinese man said it was over 100 years in the family. It still taste like rice wine, vile very vile.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:27 PM
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Oh big stink bums they are such vital ingrediants. You could try and I can't spell it properly but it starts with the letter A. It's a powder that is used in some Indian food to replace onions and garlic as supposedly onions and garlic stimulate the sexual organs which is a big NO no in some religion in India not Hindu. Try uncle Google. It's a yellow powder that smelks like onions.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:28 PM
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Sorry not sure about ginger replacement.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:29 PM
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a reply to: Cloudbuster

could it be Anise?



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:30 PM
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Sorry tried to edit but wouldn't work but I think Hari Krishna use the powder I was talking about.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:31 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Not anise. Some thing like asotifida.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:36 PM
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originally posted by: Benevolent Heretic
a reply to: Atsbhct

Oh! That's too bad! I love ginger AND garlic! It would be awful to give either up... I would try allspice.



Substitutes for Ginger

For 1 teaspoon fresh or ground ginger, substitute 1 teaspoon ground allspice, ground cinnamon, ground mace, or ground nutmeg.
Source



This reminds me of chai!!! Hmmm chai!



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: Cloudbuster

yes Asafoetida



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: ChesterJohn

Intensely aromatic - related to Truffle and Garlic



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: Cloudbuster



asafoetida replacement for garlic



It is very popular as a spice in Indian cuisine as well as soups and stews, due to the onion/garlic/leek taste (as well as a truffle flavour) that it can bring to a dish.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:44 PM
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You could try substituting wild garlic leaves or garlic chives into the Asian dishes, would give a hint of garlic flavour but may not cause a reaction as it's the leaf rather than the bulb. The chives are really easy to grow, you'd need to be lucky to have a seasonal wild garlic supply.

The ginger is a lit trickier as its so unique, asofoetida has been suggested which would give some balance. For Indian food it may be worth trying tamarind which is quite lemony. Galangal may be worth trying as quite similar although it's a rhizome too so may cause the same problem. Hate to suggest it but have you tried dried ginger?

Hope that helps



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 01:14 PM
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Fresh raw turmeric is a bit similar to ginger. The powder form does not compare and the raw root is hard to find, but has a nice little kick. It has a plethora of health benefits, if interested here is a link,
www.healthdiaries.com...
Here is another link that details a bit more on who should not use turmeric (side effects, interactions with meds)
www.healthguidance.org...
As for garlic? A bit of cumin and white pepper?
As posted above a bit of lime seems like a good idea.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 01:23 PM
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originally posted by: Benevolent Heretic
a reply to: Cloudbuster



asafoetida replacement for garlic



It is very popular as a spice in Indian cuisine as well as soups and stews, due to the onion/garlic/leek taste (as well as a truffle flavour) that it can bring to a dish.


It is fantastic as a base ingreidient for indian dishes although needs carefull moderation.

If I rember correctly it is often used in ayurvedic diest where onions and garlic are prohibited.

As mentioned earlier it can have unpleasant gastric effects for some so use with caution



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 01:35 PM
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a reply to: DrBobH


I believe we actually grow garlic chives at the end of a row in the garden....and I literally have never picked them, they just grow wild there. We may have inherited them from the previous gardener.



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