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Does anyone know why following the death of a close family member...

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posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 12:45 AM
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...A huge amount of people find that they are no longer able to clearly picture the face of the person who had died?

This is something which I have often wondered about and have spoken to many friends who have all reported the same.

It seems to resolve over time but in the first few days it is very prevalent.

Is it simply a part of the normal grieving process and if so why do so many experience it?




posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 01:05 AM
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a reply to: Jc333

Interesting, I've never heard of that before, is there a name for such a condition? My guess would be its some sort of psychological safeguard mechanism, similar to how we block out traumatic memories. Recalling the face of the deceased will trigger other memories of that person and stir up strong emotions, so perhaps the subconscious mind prevents you from recalling their face, and might even cause you to forget other things about the deceased. I'm guessing that in extreme cases the person will forget that the deceased ever existed.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 01:32 AM
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My guess would be the brain is dealing with the loss of the person and is blocking images in order to cope / start the mental healing process. As time goes on the person is better able to detail with.

Just a guess..
edit on 2-11-2015 by Xcathdra because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 01:45 AM
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a reply to: Jc333

Opposite for me. I see the face clearly and it fades over time.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 02:31 AM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
Opposite for me. I see the face clearly and it fades over time.


Agree. With time, all images fade, but some fade quicker than others. Besides, I find that my photos tend to refresh memory.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 03:09 AM
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originally posted by: ChaoticOrder
a reply to: Jc333

Interesting, I've never heard of that before, is there a name for such a condition? My guess would be its some sort of psychological safeguard mechanism, similar to how we block out traumatic memories. Recalling the face of the deceased will trigger other memories of that person and stir up strong emotions, so perhaps the subconscious mind prevents you from recalling their face, and might even cause you to forget other things about the deceased. I'm guessing that in extreme cases the person will forget that the deceased ever existed.


Iv'e no idea, which is why I asked. But what you say seems very plausible.I doubt that you would ever erase a loved ones memory from your mind for ever though.
I know that when my Mother died I found it hard to remember what she looked like with absolute clarity for a couple of days after she passed. She was my Mother but I couldn't seem to get her face in focus and I felt so guilty about it.

My friends have all said similar things and I'm surprised that no-one else has experienced this.
Maybe we are all just daft as brushes... :-)



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 03:11 AM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra
My guess would be the brain is dealing with the loss of the person and is blocking images in order to cope / start the mental healing process. As time goes on the person is better able to detail with.

Just a guess..


I have also thought that this is the best explanation. I just wondered if it was a known condition or syndrome.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 04:12 AM
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I'm not a psychologist, but let me hazard a guess.

The image of the person's face is not any less clear than it ever was. While the person is alive, it's not necessary to keep a clear mental image. After the person has died, you become more focused on that mental image because it suddenly becomes more important to remember what they look like. You gradually fill in the details and the image becomes more clear over time.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 04:35 AM
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a reply to: N3k9Ni

Thanks, I get what you're saying. But for me it was my Mother.
I knew exactly what she looked like, right up until they took her away. Then I could never get her face to focus in my mind.
It was really weird and I thought that it was just me until another friend said the same and then the floodgates opened.

It's more interesting now to me that no-one else seems to have experienced this.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 06:46 AM
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I wonder if it is because you have a catalogue of images dating back many years and in many poses and expressions, so it is hard to pick one and focus on it. I think of my father and I can picture him clearly now, but not 10 years ago (he died 13 years ago). I think it is because I have settled on which image I think of when I think of him.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 08:59 AM
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a reply to: Cinrad

When I think of my father who died about 15 years ago, usually it is of a specific time / memory. I don't really think about him in a generic sense. I've never forgotten how any of my close relatives who passed looked. Yes, their faces may be a little fuzzy, but I think it is just because I'm relying on past memories.

The same happens even with people / friends that I haven't seen in a long time. I have a mental image in memory of what they look like. However, once I see them after an extended period, that mental image gets updated - people age, gain / lose weight, hair changes color, etc.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 09:46 AM
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I would think it is Hundreth Monkey related. As they are no longer connected to the "grid". I have read about people going invisible at parties and stuff and I feel it is along the same lines. It usually has a precursor event like the only friend they were with saw them go into the bathroom and the next person in line did not witness them leave, so everyone on Earth at the time that is focused on the vanished assumes they are in the bath room. Some how they slip between deminsions or something because their connection to the " grid" is dependant on the observer as much as themselves. These people talk about screaming in their friends face and no one responds as if they are even there. The whole I can go invisible only when no one is watching trick.

Kids going missing, "I turned around for just a second looked back and he was gone.

The Observer is so important to the Quantum World, it has to have major effects on our reality. Has to.

I've also wondered about the whole they die in threes thing. If you have ever worked around the a Nursing home you have likely witnessed this phenomena many times yourself.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: Jc333

I think Tom Hank's character in Saving Private Ryan explained it well. He basically said that its tough to remember what someone looks like just by trying to picture their face. You need to recall their face in context of a memory of something that happened. Sitting across from them at dinner or something like that.



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 11:09 AM
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a reply to: Jc333

Try thinking of that person's 'energy'.. There will ALWAYS be a connection.

The most fundamental conditioning is that of "I am," the basic sense of self-centeredness. This is the sense that there is a thinker who thinks thoughts and who somehow lives in our bodies. This is the illusion that we have location.
Quantum physicists agree that in the subatomic universe objects exist in quantum nonseparability. Quantum objects are not located, they are not separate. Once having acted on another object, the objects continue to be connected. This connectedness is unaffected by distance, because the connecting force does not move through space. Close and far are the same in this regard.
...

namaste



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 02:36 PM
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originally posted by: eluryh22
a reply to: Jc333

I think Tom Hank's character in Saving Private Ryan explained it well. He basically said that its tough to remember what someone looks like just by trying to picture their face. You need to recall their face in context of a memory of something that happened. Sitting across from them at dinner or something like that.

The underlying (unconscious) need purpose of one taking photographs of those dear to each other. Before this, drawings or paintings illustrating that likeness.
edit on 2-11-2015 by vethumanbeing because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2015 @ 08:45 PM
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originally posted by: vethumanbeing

originally posted by: eluryh22
a reply to: Jc333

I think Tom Hank's character in Saving Private Ryan explained it well. He basically said that its tough to remember what someone looks like just by trying to picture their face. You need to recall their face in context of a memory of something that happened. Sitting across from them at dinner or something like that.

The underlying (unconscious) need purpose of one taking photographs of those dear to each other. Before this, drawings or paintings illustrating that likeness.
I'm not sure I understand what you are saying.....



posted on Nov, 4 2015 @ 06:07 PM
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originally posted by: eluryh22

originally posted by: vethumanbeing

originally posted by: eluryh22
a reply to: Jc333

I think Tom Hank's character in Saving Private Ryan explained it well. He basically said that its tough to remember what someone looks like just by trying to picture their face. You need to recall their face in context of a memory of something that happened. Sitting across from them at dinner or something like that.

The underlying (unconscious) need purpose of one taking photographs of those dear to each other. Before this, drawings or paintings illustrating that likeness.
I'm not sure I understand what you are saying.....

Why the reason for capturing the likeness of a loved one (differing points in time); so that you will have the 2-d image you will not remember in future years. You subconciously do it knowing you will not remember. Why the proliferation of taking 'selfies'; (the documentation of your own existence) others may not have any interest in doing as are busy documenting their own. Its interesting as seems fear based.
edit on 4-11-2015 by vethumanbeing because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2015 @ 06:13 PM
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I've lost family, and close friends, and I remember all of them clearly. Even the friend or two that died in High School...

Looks. Their personalities. Maybe faded a bit, after thirty some years. But my mother? Clear as the day when she went to the hospital.

I suspect that it's a coping mechanism. Some will have it, others, like myself, don't. It's neither a good thing, nor a bad.







 
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