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I just tested positive for TB via the skin test.

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posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 05:49 PM
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I just had to take a Tuberculosis skin test and I had a reaction that prompted further testing. They sent me to a blood work lab and pulled about 12 vials of blood out of me. They were testing for Hep B and C and HIV and all the STD panels, why are they testing for all of that too?

I am kinda freaking out! has anyone ever had a false positive from the TB skin test and been clear? I am dreading having to take liver damaging antibiotics for 9 months just to get a TB free statement. Also is treatment free in the USA?

Note: never been out of country or to jail and never had TB vaccination.

I tried googling these questions but failed to find anything but TB fact sheets and symptom lists.

Your input would be greatly appreciated.




posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 06:04 PM
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Hello, my wife is a teacher and tests positive every time with the skin test. After each test, she goes in for chest x-rays and is cleared. She has been told this means that she was exposed to TB but it never developed further than an exposure. With that said though, we are always worried each time testing rolls around. This has been going on for over a decade now without incident. Best of luck.



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 06:10 PM
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a reply to: bananashooter

They always test for everything because it's easier to test for everything all in the one go rather than have you keep coming back for new tests, and it makes ruling out different ailments all the more easier.

Fingers crossed for you.

p.s. I got tested for all that for a urinary tract infection.



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: bananashooter

Hi, I have inactive tb. I test positive but have clear xrays. I also have no idea how I contacted it since I've never been out of the country, I hardly even travel to the mainland. I did the 12 month treatment of a pill a day and it went great. You should be OK. If your TB becomes active you would probably know something is up because you will get really sick. Best of luck!



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: bananashooter

...as Hamlet said it: TB or not TB ... As the other commentary already said it, take a shot of whisky, and then book a spot for deeper check with x-ray and stuff, and hopefully this clear out ok as well.

God speed.



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: bananashooter

My SIL had an allergic reaction to the test.
She freaked out to say the least...

Could it be that?
It seems as if the Dr.s are going to the extreme with all of those vials of blood and STD tests (not sure what THEY and TB have to do with each other but, oh well).

Good luck! Let us know!



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: bananashooter


At least one-third of people living with HIV worldwide in 2014 were infected with TB bacteria. People living with HIV are 20 to 30 times more likely to develop active TB disease than people without HIV.
WHO

Some answers here^as to why they would test for all that other stuff too...
edit on 29-10-2015 by TNMockingbird because: more specific



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 06:33 PM
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Thanks for all the info, I feel a little better.

I got the x-ray today so I should find out soon, and its good they clear you if you are inactive TB, I was wondering if that was the case.



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 06:34 PM
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a reply to: ckhk3

Was your treatment free of charge?



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 06:56 PM
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No sweat no problem as long as you're not symptomatic if your x-ray comes back negative they will probably start you on a six-month course of isoniazide. what this does is just clear or purify your lung fields. it's standard diagnosis and treatment. you'll find that a lot of medical professionals have tested positive. basically moving forward you no longer have to have the skin test and every five years it'll just be a chest x-ray and even that is at your own request.

v/r

Paramedic with same experience



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 06:56 PM
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a reply to: bananashooter

This was about 10 years ago so, I don't remember paying anything if not paying much at all. I did have health insurance so I know I didn't have to pay all out of pocket. Your state or country may have support services for those who test positive for TB.



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 07:24 PM
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a reply to: bananashooter

False positives aren't that rare.

I also had to get tested for this because I work at a hospital (sadly, they also require me to get annual flu shots)

Don't sweat it - I also tested positive, my girlfriend has also tested positive - x-rays should be more revealing. Best of luck bananashooter!!



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 07:51 PM
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a reply to: bananashooter

Hello, I have crohns disease, and to be able to start a drug called Remicade, the doctors needed to be 100% sure that I didn't have latent TB. When they did the test it came back as a non-positive, where they couldn't determine 100% if I i had it or not. The reason why the results were screwed up was due to the amount of steroids and other drugs I was taking and the test couldn't be accurately done. So, long story short, they had to treat me as if I did have TB and I had to go through the drug cycle (that you'll be starting shortly). For me, i was done in 6 months... Quick warning- you CANNOT drink on this medication, your liver will be pushed hard from this drug alone, and no need to risk anything with alcohol. And secondly, try to see if your drug treatment can end after 6 months. That's when I stopped, but I requested it once I found out that the drug was "properly treated to medical standards" but I didn't prefer to do a few extra months "just to be safe" knowing how tough this pill was on my liver, and the likelihood that I didn't even have TB in the first place.

If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to ask. I'm pretty familiar with what you're about to experience and I'm happy to help answer any questions you may be wondering right now.
edit on 29-10-2015 by jhn7537 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: [post=19976964]bananashooter[/post
The reason why they are doing all of those testing, is that they want to make sure on several things:

1) There is a good chance you have been exposed to TB, with the positive testing.
2) They need to make sure that you do not have a secondary infection going on. TB is a tricky disease, and ultimately in order for you to beat it, it helps to have a healthy immune system. If your immune system is compromised, then it would mean that there is other problems that could come up.

The Doctors are wanting to rule out all other possibilities before proceeding forward. This is essential as they are going to put you on a series of medications, that have to be taken and could interact with other medications. They are wanting to get it cleared from your system.



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 08:11 PM
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Yes, I have had several false positive TB skin tests, as my skin is rather delicate and puffs up if an insect flies too close.

Having to go to the local TB healthcare facility for more in-depth screening was almost scarier than the TB scare itself... imagine having to wait in a room full of folks with active TB... with much coughing and hacking... I stood near a window breathing through my sleeve and thought if I didn't have it before, I would now... but was fine.

If they draw blood and find actual TB, then at least much of it can now be managed (barring the resistant strains that now exist)... and I would heartily suggest looking into high doses of vit c and some vit d, as they are very good at boosting one's immune system, yet not many folks know about it.

Good luck...



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 08:49 PM
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I'll be checking in to see what your results are. Hang in there!



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 09:12 PM
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Tb is SO INFECTIOUS that they have to do further screening. In my state you must do a TB test to even work in a restaurant. So don't be offended that someone has rung the alarm bells. And of course there are false positives, but that can be cleared up. If you can get some free blood work done over the issue, cool!



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 09:22 PM
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a reply to: jhn7537

How tough is the medicine on your liver? I'm taking some psychiatric meds that are tough on my liver, but is this so bad that 6 months of it causes serious damage?



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: bananashooter

Many years ago I tested positive for TB, and had to got through blood tests too.

The reason for the other tests is due to finding out what medication you can use. If you've been treated for say Hep, you'll not be able to take the meds they dish out for TB. If you did, it would end up destroying your liver and killing you.

When I tested positive, and then they checked my blood, I tested positive for TB but it was dormant. It was explained to me that you can get TB simply by someone sneezing on you who has it, but their TB is active. Our bodies have a natureal immunity to fight it, but if your immune system is low at the time of exposure (IE you just got over being sick.....have a immune deficiency.....etc) you can be infected with TB yourself.

It can be dormant in your system for a very long time, and then be triggered to go active by something as simple as getting the flu.

I had to go on meds for 6 months taking Isoniazid. I also had to take extra vitamine B pills for it. Each month they took blood to check and make sure the Isoniazid was teaching my body how to fight off the TB. After 6 months I was clear.



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 09:51 PM
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a reply to: bananashooter




never had TB vaccination.



Sorry to hear about your testing positive for TB but the statement above says a lot , well to me at least . And the graph below also . This is the TB rate in Australia since inoculations were started in schools .






Australia’s overseas-born population continued to represent the majority of TB notifications (88%) with a notification rate of 20.2 per 100,000.

edit on 29-10-2015 by hutch622 because: (no reason given)



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