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Expedition Finds 'Ancient Shipwreck Capital of the World'

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posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 05:39 PM
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Expedition Finds 'Ancient Shipwreck Capital of the World'


Another amazing discovery, this time in the Greek archipelago close to Turkey in the eastern Aegean Sea.



Teams from Greece and the US have made one of the biggest archaeological finds of the year, Discovery reports. While exploring Greece's Fourni archipelago, the Greek Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities and RPM Nautical Foundation stumbled across what Smithsonian describes as an "artifact jackpot" and what Discovery says could be "the ancient shipwreck capital of the world."

Source

The team found 22 shipwrecks in just 17 square miles and claim 30 to 40 could be found in less than a month.



During the very first dive of the expedition, the team found the remains of a late Roman-period wreck strewn with sea grass in shallow water. By day 5, the researchers had discovered evidence of nine more sunken ships. The next day, they found another six. By the time the 13-day survey was finished, the divers had located 22 shipwrecks— some more than 2,500 years old — that had never been scientifically documented before.

So far, three shipwrecks have given us previously never before discovered examples of ancient jars called amphoras. (shown below)


The crew have only examined 5% of Fourni's coastline, an area never before explored and plan to go back with underwater robots next year.


The only reason they deliberately stopped is because they weren't prepared to accurately record the amount of shipwrecks they had discovered. I can't wait for all the details to emerge. Not much more to add, sorry.




edit on 29-10-2015 by eisegesis because: clarity




posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 05:47 PM
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Imagine if they find another Antikythera mechanism. All that unopened wine. Seeds of vegetable plants that are now unknown to us (Romans/Greece had over twenty different species of carrot that were in colors that are no longer found).



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 05:51 PM
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Actually amphorae have been found in shipwrecks before...

from the link you provided:



Amphorae designed for marine transport, taken from shipwrecks of the Bronze Age, on display in the Museum of Underwater Archaeology at Bodrum Castle, Turkey.



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 06:02 PM
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they might be sunk by the explosion of isle of thera about 3500 years ago....



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: TarzanBeta

From the first link:


And ancient jars—called amphoras—from at least three of the sites have never been found in shipwrecks before.

They're discussing the style of amphora found being unique to these shipwrecks compared to ones that have been previously found.

From the source:


"What is astonishing is not only the number of the shipwrecks but also the diversity of the cargoes, some of which have been found for first time," Koutsouflakis said.

The cargoes reveal long distance trades between the Black Sea, Aegean Sea, Cyprus, the Levant, and Egypt in all those periods. At least three ships carried a cargo of amphoras, or jars, that have not been found previously on shipwrecks.

These are Archaic period (700-480 B.C.) Samian amphoras, Late Roman (3rd-7th centuries A.D.) Sinopean (carrot-shaped) amphoras, and large 2nd century A.D. Black Sea amphoras that carried fish sauce.


edit on 29-10-2015 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: eisegesis

Wonder how much gold they will find and whether it will be any good anyway.

Nice find all the same



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 07:05 PM
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a reply to: eisegesis

Their statement in that story is severe miscommunication then.

After reading the Discovery article upon which that one is based, I found the exact same line in the Discovery article.

I suppose you may be right that they are talking about the specific style then.

But the finding of the shipwrecks is an interesting thing indeed...



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 07:18 PM
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a reply to: eisegesis

Fantastic find and brilliant OP. Il be following this story for any finds what might help piece together unknown information about these people.

All I can say is fantastic.



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 07:18 PM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Never heard about gold turning bad. But people with gold....



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 07:22 PM
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Now that they have revealed it's location and don't plan to go back until next year. .. i bet certain governments or agencies not to mention rouge treasure hunters and chancers will be already planning to loot this area.

Any real discoveries or treasure will never be revealed to us...
edit on 29/10/15 by Misterlondon because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 07:36 PM
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Based upon the variety of the ages of the shipwrecks, I think it would be more interesting, not necessarily to discover the treasures, but why so many ships failed at this point. I think I know what I'm about to do... lol.

Of course, the article mentions that merely the amount of traffic is to account for these, and that may be the case... but there is a lot of traffic everywhere and yet there are still spots that are more dangerous than others to this day. I think that might be a cop-out statement. Hmm.
edit on 10/29/2015 by TarzanBeta because: Elaboration.



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 07:39 PM
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originally posted by: Misterlondon
Now that they have revealed it's location and don't plan to go back until next year. .. i bet certain governments or agencies not to mention rouge treasure hunters and chancers will be already planning to loot this area.

Any real discoveries or treasure will never be revealed to us...

The chance to loot the place existed well before the announcement. Local fisherman and sponge divers were first to discover remnants of these ships which ultimately lead to the expedition. With foreknowledge of the location, they had a choice to do business or preserve their history. With that said, there's always one rotten banana in the bunch. Imagine what we have never had the opportunity to witness.



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 08:58 PM
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a reply to: stormcell

more colours than this?



posted on Oct, 29 2015 @ 09:42 PM
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a reply to: eisegesis

I couldnt think of a cooler job than treasure hunter.



posted on Oct, 30 2015 @ 09:24 AM
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originally posted by: Curious69
a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Never heard about gold turning bad. But people with gold....


The colour of Gold can change when in water for long enough periods! It would be Green/Blue Colour!



posted on Oct, 30 2015 @ 11:05 AM
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originally posted by: Misterlondon
Now that they have revealed it's location and don't plan to go back until next year. .. i bet certain governments or agencies not to mention rouge treasure hunters and chancers will be already planning to loot this area.

Any real discoveries or treasure will never be revealed to us...


Pedantic bit first, it's rogue, not rouge, unless they have applied blusher. If treasure was found, how do you know the original expedition didn't find it and quietly profit from it? If you are implying anything a government would 'want to keep from us', why would you expect anything to be found that would be so significant? The cause for so many wrecks could be down to all manner of reasons such as extreme weather, war, piracy etc. All extremely interesting to a historian, but hardly something to hide.



posted on Oct, 30 2015 @ 06:45 PM
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originally posted by: TarzanBeta
Based upon the variety of the ages of the shipwrecks, I think it would be more interesting, not necessarily to discover the treasures, but why so many ships failed at this point. I think I know what I'm about to do... lol.

Of course, the article mentions that merely the amount of traffic is to account for these, and that may be the case... but there is a lot of traffic everywhere and yet there are still spots that are more dangerous than others to this day. I think that might be a cop-out statement. Hmm.


The current runs along the coast counter-clockwise and passes between the islands where the wreckage area is. The difficulty, for the sailors, is that at the point where the current runs through the islands, it can be met by winds heading in the opposite direction. Heavily laden ships may have been less able to make the necessary adjustments to their course to avoid being run aground against submerged rocks closer to shore, or under certain conditions the waters may become a maelstrom, dragging vessels into the rocks? Should be easy enough to find out, I am sure people still sail those waters.

Those currents had been used to fish for tuna since about 7500 BCE though, so the locals would have known about the tempestuous nature of that stretch. I would then wonder whether the shipwrecks were representative of merchants from further afield, via the Black Sea perhaps?

ETA, just thinking about that, since the ships were laden with Greek goods, and the prevailing currents render the Med a one way system, of course the ships were enroute "home".
edit on 30-10-2015 by Anaana because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2015 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: eisegesis

Someone beat me to it!

+1 for the Sirens theory!



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